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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

News from the SVGM

Hello everyone!~~~
This has been quite the interesting summer weather-wise, hasn't it? It almost seemed like things flipped there for a while: we had autumn early, then we got summer, and now we're back into autumn~~and this time officially. I welcomed the cool early morning breeze today after these last days of searing heat. All week long, however, in morning glances out my windows, I caught sight of swirling, falling leaves reflected in the sunlight~~~they were beautiful moments of peace to me, a show of the change in season we're now going through.

As I walked through the SVGM stands last week, I saw gorgeous tomatoes, red peppers, beans and summer squashes; I saw cabbages, pumpkins, spinach, kale and broccoli, fresh herbs and greens, and corn. Freshly cut pork and beef and chicken, wonderful cheeses, and even fresh butter~~new from Stone Meadow Farm (if you've never had freshly churned butter, you owe it to yourself to try some.)

This is the most bountiful time at our market, and it bears repeating, over and over, as I so often do in these emails. This is the time of year to eat as many local vegetables as we can, precisely because there's such a wide variety~~grill them, saute them, roast them, make soups, make chilis, make kebobs, make quiche!  If you're a vegetarian, you're in your glory right now;  if you're not, pair them up with your favorite locally raised meat or poultry, and find yourself in your own bit of food heaven. Make enough veggies for dinner to have for lunch the next day, between slices of bread with cheese, or folded into eggs, or topping salad greens....  Whatever you do, get over to the market tomorrow and stock up and make use of the wonderful array of locally grown foods that characterize these early fall months. It's sunny, it's fall, it's high harvest time~~~

 A blessed Autumn to you all~~~
We look forward to seeing you tomorrow!

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses; fresh butter; grass-fed beef: lean ground beef, steaks, ribs, and specialty cuts & products; veal
Cow-a-Hen Farm:
Beef, Pork, and Poultry: Freshly Ground Beef this week along with other fresh cuts; Pork and Poultry also
Beaver Run Farms:
Pork and chicken, specialty cuts and products 
Tarsa Family Farm:
Heirloom red, white & blue potatoes, garlic, heirloom tomatoes, hot and sweet peppers and onions, eggs, specialty lemonades, wool, plants
Quaff Meadows:
Sweet corn, green beans, kale, zucchini, Swiss chard, daikon radish, cucumbers, candy onions, red onions, red beets, carrots, garlic, cabbage, red and white potatoes, eggplant, eggs, and lamb, flowers
Garden Secrets:  PA Preferred
All natural ketchups, barbecue sauces, mustards~~~hot pepper relish, sweet pepper relish and pickled green tomatoes, Cherokee Port Gourmet ketchup
Wild for Salmon: First Friday of each month
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay
Broadway Acres Farm:
Zucchini, yellow squash, kale, chard, garlic, tomatoes, green and yellow beans, hot peppers, potatoes, green tomatoes, sweet corn, blue hubbard squash, cabbages, kohlrabi, broccoli, beets
Buzzsaw Coffee:  
Brewed coffee, brewed iced coffee, coffee beans, granola
Gib's Farm:
Cut flowers, plants, herbs, edible flowers, seasonal produce: this week featuring micro greens, herb and dried flower wreaths, succulent boxes and terrariums
Punako Lane Artisan Hearth: back next week!
Artisan hearth-baked breads and biscotti, specialty items
Hidden Branch Farm:
Sweet corn, tomatoes, summer squash, zucchini, green beans, basil, chard, beets, eggplant, cabbage, potatoes, onions, peppers, pumpkins, kale, spinach

Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com
Like us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Susquehanna-Valley-Growers-Market-164215936969045/

Seasonal Recipe 
Savory Corn, Chard, and Ricotta Galette
Adapted from http://finecooking.com
Recipe by Mindy Fox, August/September 2016
Makes one 9-1/2 inch galette, serves 4-6

Savory galettes are one of the most versatile things you can have in your recipe repertoire: they're delicious; they work equally impressively for a family dinner or a dinner party; you can pair them with a salad for a light dinner or as a side with another main course and salad; you can use them as an appetizer sliced in smaller pieces. Use leftover vegetables, or saute or roast fresh for the galette. Keep a stash of pie dough in the freezer, and some good cheeses on hand, and you've got the basics when the vegetables arrive.  Use different herbs, nuts and seeds for crunch, capers and olives for zing. The biggest thing to remember is to make sure the prepared vegetables are free of excess liquid as much as possible~~~you may want to throw sautéed greens into a colander and press on them with the back of a spoon just to make sure any excess is drained. Also, to ensure the pastry is crisp on the bottom, sprinkle some bread crumbs or parmesan or pecorino cheese over it before spreading the vegetables. Enjoy~~~~many times over!

Ingredients:
1 recipe Galette Dough, recipe below
All-purpose flour, for rolling the dough
2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped Vidalia or other sweet onion
6 lightly packed cups chopped Swiss chard leaves (from about 1/2 bunch, any variety; reserve the stems for another use)
2 cups fresh corn kernels (from 3 to 4 medium ears)
2 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 small fresh red chile, such as Fresno, seeded and finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbs. chopped fresh mint
1 large egg plus 1 large egg yolk
1 tsp. heavy cream or whole milk
9 oz. fresh ricotta (1-1/4 cups)
1-1/4 oz. Parmigiano-Reggiano, coarsely grated (about 1/2 cup)
Flaky sea salt

Directions:
Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Let the dough sit at room temperature until pliable, 10 to 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the chard and cook until tender, 3 to 4 minutes.Remove the skillet from the heat, and stir in the corn, garlic, chile, 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, and a pinch pepper. Transfer to a large plate or rimmed baking sheet to cool, then toss with 1 Tbs. of the mint.
In a small bowl, whisk the whole egg and cream. In a large bowl, combine the ricotta, Parmigiano, the remaining 1 Tbs. mint, the egg yolk, 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, and a pinch pepper. Reserve 1/4 cup of the cheese mixture. Gently mix the remaining cheese mixture with the Swiss chard mixture.
Roll the dough between 2 sheets of lightly floured parchment paper into a 14-inch round, loosening the parchment from the dough occasionally and adding a bit more flour if it sticks. Transfer on the parchment to a baking sheet; remove and discard the top sheet of parchment.

Leaving a 2-inch border, spread the chard mixture over the dough, then dollop with the reserved cheese mixture.

Fold the edge of the dough up and over the filling. If the dough is sticking to the parchment, refrigerate it for 5 to 10 minutes, and then continue folding. Brush the folded dough with the egg wash.

Bake, rotating the baking sheet once halfway through, until the crust is golden brown, 40 to 50 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack, season generously with flaky sea salt, and let cool for 10 to 15 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Galette Dough
Ingredients:
6-3/4 oz. (1-1/2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp. granulated sugar
1/4 tsp. kosher salt
4-1/2 oz. (9 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
4 to 5 Tbs. ice water

Directions:
To use a food processor
Pulse the flour, sugar, and salt to combine. Add the butter pieces, and pulse until the mixture looks like coarse meal with some pea-size pieces. Sprinkle with 4 Tbs. of the water, and pulse until the dough comes together. If too dry, add the remaining water by the teaspoon, and pulse until the dough just comes together.

To work by hand
In a large bowl, whisk the flour, sugar, and salt. Using a pastry cutter or your fingertips, work the butter into the mixture until most of it resembles coarse meal with some pea-size pieces. Form a well in the center. Sprinkle with 4 Tbs. of the ice water. Mix with your fingertips until the dough holds together enough to form a ball. If too dry, add the remaining water by the teaspoon, and mix until the dough comes together.

For both methods
Form the dough into a  ball, put it between two sheets of plastic wrap, and then press it into an 8-inch round. Wrap it tightly in more plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or up to 2 days before rolling out. (Or freeze it for up to 2 months; thaw in the refrigerator overnight before rolling it out.)

Thursday, September 21, 2017

News from the SVGM

Hello everyone!~~~

Late summer's last hurrah officially ends tomorrow at 4:02 pm as we cross that magical and mystical seasonal line that we call Autumn Equinox. Early evening hours are one of my favorite times to be outside, and this time of year I find myself regularly overestimating how much daylight I actually have left: last night I found myself pruning away until I could barely see, the light disappearing all too quickly..... The plants are loving this belated dry heat, but soon they, too, will be winding down with the daylight.

Our tables are full of the transitional vegetables that make this time of year so bountiful and unique. You'll find everything from zucchini and tomatoes and sweet corn, to cabbages and pumpkins and blue hubbard squash. These evenings are a beautiful time to stand outside and grill, beverage in hand, as the sun goes down and the air cools into a refreshing breeze: our meat and poultry farmers have an incredible variety of chicken and pork and beef and specialty cuts to make the most of those cooking times outside!

We are excited to share a very special event that Wild for Salmon is hosting in a couple of weeks. From their email to us:

"On October 4th, Steve and Jen will be hosting a screening of a documentary called The Breach, which was directed by Mark Titus, a filmmaker and one of our crew members on our boat this year! The film documents wild salmon populations, conservation, and how human interactions affect their ability to thrive, and both Steve and Mark will offer a Q&A (a sort of meet the fisherman/meet the filmmaker) afterwards."
Find the details here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/290543038097264/

Wild for Salmon has been with the SVGM since both the market and their company began, and we have been thrilled to watch this wonderful, conscientious family enterprise grow and thrive. Throughout, Steve and Jen Kurian have done all they can to educate their customers about sustainability efforts in the Alaskan fishing industry and beyond. This looks like a great opportunity to learn even more in this critical time we live in.

So enjoy this last blast of summer, revel in the clear blue skies and sunshine~~~ and a Happy Autumn to you all~~~
We look forward to seeing you tomorrow!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses; grass-fed beef: lean ground beef, steaks, ribs, and specialty cuts & products; veal
Cow-a-Hen Farm:
Beef, Pork, and Poultry: this week, freshly cut pork and freshly dressed poultry
Beaver Run Farms:
Pork and chicken, specialty cuts and products 
Tarsa Family Farm:
Heirloom red, white & blue potatoes, garlic, beets, chard, kale, fennel, eggplant, green beans, celery, basil, and onions, eggs, specialty lemonades, wool, plants
Quaff Meadows:
Sweet corn, green beans, kale, zucchini, Swiss chard, daikon radish, cucumbers, candy onions, red onions, red beets, carrots, garlic, cabbage, red and white potatoes, eggplant, eggs, and lamb, flowers
Garden Secrets:  PA Preferred
All natural ketchups, barbecue sauces, mustards~~~hot pepper relish, sweet pepper relish and pickled green tomatoes, Cherokee Port Gourmet ketchup
Wild for Salmon: First Friday of each month
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay
Broadway Acres Farm:
Zucchini, yellow squash, kale, garlic, tomatoes, green and yellow beans, hot peppers, potatoes, green tomatoes, sweet corn, blue hubbard squash, cabbage, kohlrabi, chard, beets
Buzzsaw Coffee:  
Brewed coffee, brewed iced coffee, coffee beans, granola
Gib's Farm:
Cut flowers, plants, herbs, edible flowers, seasonal produce: this week featuring micro greens, herb and dried flower wreaths, succulent boxes and terrariums
Punako Lane Artisan Hearth:
Artisan hearth-baked breads and biscotti, specialty items
Hidden Branch Farm:
Sweet corn, tomatoes, summer squash, zucchini, green beans, basil, chard, beets, eggplant, cabbage, potatoes, onions, peppers, pumpkins

Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com
Like us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Susquehanna-Valley-Growers-Market-164215936969045/

Seasonal Recipe 
Grilled Pomegranate-Glazed Chicken With Tomato Salad
Adapted from http://cooking.nytimes.com
Recipe by Melissa Clark
Serves 4

Pomegranate molasses has many uses in traditional Mediterranean cuisine, but you'll find many new uses for it once you start experimenting with it: add a teaspoon of it to a vinaigrette, add a couple tablespoons to finish a lamb stew, use it as a glaze for chicken or other fowl. Here, it is used both as a finishing glaze for an aromatically spiced grilled chicken, and as a vinaigrette ingredient for the accompanying tomato salad.

Ingredients:
2 teaspoons ground cumin
 Kosher salt
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
½ teaspoon ground allspice
 Black pepper
 Large pinch cayenne
3 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 8)
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10 thyme branches
7 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 tablespoons, plus 2 teaspoons pomegranate molasses
1 pint cherry tomatoes, or equal amount of heirloom tomato, chunked
10 fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces if large

Directions:
In a small bowl, combine cumin, 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, paprika, allspice, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper and cayenne. Place chicken in a large bowl and toss with spice mixture, 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, thyme, and 6 of the chopped garlic cloves. Let rest for 30 minutes to an hour at room temperature or as long as overnight in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before grilling.

Prepare the grill for indirect heat. For a gas grill, set one side to high. For a charcoal grill, mound coals on one side, leaving the other side empty. Brush off garlic and herbs and put chicken pieces on the unlighted or empty portion of the grill. Close cover and cook until chicken is cooked through, about 10 minutes a side. Transfer to a plate and brush generously with 2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses.

Mash remaining garlic with a pinch of salt until it forms a paste. Toss the tomatoes with garlic paste, remaining 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, 2 teaspoons pomegranate molasses and basil leaves. Season with additional salt, to taste. Serve alongside chicken.


Thursday, September 14, 2017

News from the SVGM

Hello everyone!~~~

It was quite a week with all the heartbreaking news coming out of  the storm-ridden South, and, again, I found myself feeling immensely blessed to be living in an area that rarely feels so ravaged. Our landscape in this valley surrounds us with a sometimes indescribable beauty, and this time of year gives much to us with its river and streams and creeks, and its rolling fields and small farms, and its farmers and others who turn its bounty into delicious artisan foodstuffs. Our vendors' tables and coolers and freezers are full of this harvest time's goods, and the time to take advantage of all this goodness is winding down~~~
this season has gone by quickly, and the Autumn Equinox is but a week away, and the outdoor season for the Growers' Market has only seven Fridays left.  We are truly blessed with the wonderfully loyal support that you, our customers, have continued to provide. Thank you again, so very sincerely, because without you the market wouldn't be.  But be sure to put us on your Friday reminder lists: make the most of the rest of this growing season, and nourish yourselves and your family and friends with the bounty that early fall brings by shopping at the SVGM.

"I arrived in the Susquehanna Valley in 1974 for what I figured would be maybe 5 years. I'm still here. Why?

Well, there aren't any storm surges from hurricanes, or regular tornado outbreaks, or wildfires fueled by the Santa Anna winds. There are changing seasons, adequate water supplies, and green summers. Yes, the winter can be cold at times and snowy. But summer, with it's variety of fresh from the farmer vegetables and fruits makes this a food lovers paradise. We are in the fat of the season---ENJOY!!!"     Bill Callahan, Cow-a-Hen Farm

We look forward to seeing you tomorrow!

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses; grass-fed beef: lean ground beef, steaks, ribs, and specialty cuts & products; veal
Cow-a-Hen Farm:
Beef, Pork, and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms:
Pork and chicken, specialty cuts and products 
Tarsa Family Farm:
Heirloom red, white & blue potatoes, garlic, beets, chard, kale, fennel, eggplant, green beans, celery, basil, and onions, eggs, specialty lemonades, wool, plants
Quaff Meadows:
Lettuce, corn, green beans, kale, zucchini, Swiss chard, cucumbers, candy onions, red onions, red beets, carrots, garlic, cabbage, red and white potatoes, eggplant, and lamb
Garden Secrets:  PA Preferred
All natural ketchups, barbecue sauces, mustards~~~hot pepper relish, sweet pepper relish and pickled green tomatoes, Cherokee Port Gourmet ketchup
Wild for Salmon: First Friday of each month
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay
Broadway Acres Farm:
Zucchini, yellow squash, kale, jalapeños, garlic, cucumbers, tomatoes, green and yellow beans, hot peppers, potatoes, green tomatoes, eggs
Buzzsaw Coffee:  
Brewed coffee, brewed iced coffee, coffee beans, granola
Gib's Farm:
Cut flowers, plants, herbs, edible flowers, seasonal produce: including salad mix and escarole, radishes, spring onions, squash, and microgreens
Livin Dreams Farm: 
Oyster mushrooms,  plantain salve
Punako Lane Artisan Hearth:
Artisan hearth-baked breads and biscotti, specialty items
Hidden Branch Farm:
Sweet corn, tomatoes, summer squash, zucchini, green beans, basil, chard, beets, eggplant, cabbage, potatoes, onions, peppers

Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com
Like us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Susquehanna-Valley-Growers-Market-164215936969045/

Seasonal Recipe 
Farro and Tomato Salad with Fish-Sauce Vinaigrette
Adapted from http://www.bonappetit.com
Recipe by Joshua McFadden of Ava Gene's, Portland, Oregon
Serves 4

Salty, crunchy, and herbaceous—this is a perfect side dish for grilled meats or fish, and another delicious way to turn some of those tomatoes into a substantial salad. And look closely-- there's no added oil in the vinaigrette, just the tablespoon used to char the scallions. This could be a good contender for another vegetarian main dish salad. Try adding or substituting mint or basil to or for the tarragon; the crunch of nuts or pepitas would be a nice addition, too.

Ingredients:

For the vinaigrette:
1 garlic clove, grated
3 tablespoons fish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam)
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
Farro and assembly:
1 cup semi-pearled farro
Kosher salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 bunch scallions, trimmed, and cut into 1-1 1/2 inch pieces
8 ounces small tomatoes, preferably heirloom, cut into 1/2" wedges
8 ounces cherry and/or pear tomatoes, halved
2 market cucumbers, thinly sliced
1/2 cup parsley leaves
1/2 cup tarragon leaves
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
Vinaigrette:
Whisk garlic, fish sauce, vinegar, sugar, and 1 tablespoon water in a small bowl until sugar dissolves. Vinaigrette can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.

Farro and assembly:
Cook farro in a medium pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until tender, 20–25 minutes. Drain; transfer to a large bowl.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Cook scallions, turning occasionally, until charred all over, about 4 minutes. Transfer to bowl with farro. Add both types of tomatoes, cucumbers, parsley, and tarragon and toss to combine. Add vinaigrette and toss again to coat; season with pepper.

Bonus Recipe
Pickled Green Tomatoes

Adapted from cooking.nytimes.com
Recipe by Martha Rose Schulman, featured in: How To Make Pickles Without Canning
Makes 4 pints

"This recipe is an adaptation of a recipe in Fred Dubose’s wonderful cookbook from a bygone era, 'Four Great Southern Cooks.' It is sort of a cross between a pickle and a relish. Do not worry about the salt; most of it will go out when the tomatoes are drained."

Ingredients:
2 pounds green tomatoes, sliced
⅓ cup kosher salt
1 ¾ cups cider vinegar
⅔ cup raw brown sugar
3 tablespoons whole mustard seeds
¼ teaspoon celery seeds
1 ½ teaspoons turmeric
2 large yellow onions, sliced
2 large green peppers, seeded and diced
1 to 2 hot red or green chiles (such as a Serrano or jalapeño), seeded if desired and minced

Directions:
Discard stem and blossom ends of tomatoes and place on a rack over a baking sheet. Sprinkle evenly with salt and refrigerate for 8 to 10 hours or overnight. Place in a colander and drain for another 30 minutes.

Combine vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, celery seeds and turmeric in a large, heavy saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Add onions and simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, peppers and chiles, stir together and bring back to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes.

Pour into hot, sterilized jars. Seal and allow cool. Refrigerate for at least 2 weeks before serving.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

News from the SVGM

Hi everyone!~~~

The nights are crisply cool, aren’t they, with a clarity to them that heightens the sounds and smells that fills them. I’ve noticed the cicadas have diminished in the evenings, if I notice them at all, but the crickets and the mourning doves seem to echo more loudly. Early in the week I was awakened in the middle of the night by the eerie scream of a red fox; I listened to it for a long few minutes, and the next morning I saw just where it had been, only thirty feet or so from my open bedroom window….

And though this early fall weather seems to have settled firmly in, it is, after all, still technically late summer, and we are still firmly in the midst of the growing season’s high harvest time. We’re finally seeing sweet corn at a couple of our vendors stands, and winter squash and a new flush of lettuces aren’t too far behind, and the colors of the cut flowers have a breathtaking depth~~

We have much to be thankful for, having been spared serious flooding and crop damage with the copious amounts of rain we’ve had, and though some of those storms were severe, in the face of what those in the hurricanes’ paths are and will be dealing with, we’ve had a comfortable time of it this summer.

So remember to be grateful for all we have here: a gorgeous and fertile river valley, the immediacy of nature’s beauty and changing seasons, connected and connecting communities of supportive friends and strangers~~~remember, too, to send out a prayer, or some loving energy, and as many blessings as you can muster, to those living along our southern coastlines, as they struggle to rebuild in the storms’ aftermath. There are those nearby in this Susquehanna Valley, who know just how difficult that struggle can be.

And blessings to you, our supportive and loyal customers, we are always grateful for your patronage and company!
We look forward to seeing you tomorrow!

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses; grass-fed beef: lean ground beef, steaks, ribs, and specialty cuts & products; veal
Cow-a-Hen Farm:
Beef, Pork, and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms:
Pork and chicken, specialty cuts and products
Tarsa Family Farm:
Heirloom red, white & blue potatoes, garlic, beets, chard, kale, fennel, eggplant, green beans, celery, basil, and onions, eggs, specialty lemonades, wool, plants
Quaff Meadows:
Lettuce, corn, green beans, kale, zucchini, Swiss chard, cucumbers, candy onions, red onions, red beets, carrots, garlic, cabbage, red and white potatoes, eggplant, and lamb
Garden Secrets:  PA Preferred
All natural ketchups, barbecue sauces, mustards~~~hot pepper relish, sweet pepper relish and pickled green tomatoes, Cherokee Port Gourmet ketchup
Wild for Salmon: First Friday of each month
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay
Broadway Acres Farm:
Zucchini, yellow squash, kale, jalapeños, garlic, cucumbers, tomatoes, green and yellow beans, hot peppers, potatoes, green tomatoes, eggs
Buzzsaw Coffee:  
Brewed coffee, brewed iced coffee, coffee beans, granola
Gib's Farm:
Cut flowers, plants, herbs, edible flowers, seasonal produce: including salad mix and escarole, radishes, spring onions, squash, and microgreens
Livin Dreams Farm: 
Oyster mushrooms,  plantain salve
Punako Lane Artisan Hearth:
Artisan hearth-baked breads and biscotti, specialty items
Hidden Branch Farm:
Sweet corn, tomatoes, summer squash, zucchini, green beans, basil, chard, beets, eggplant, cabbage, potatoes, onions, peppers

Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com
Like us on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/Susquehanna-Valley-Growers-Market-164215936969045/


Seasonal Recipe 
Pasta With Kale, Shiitake Mushrooms and Sausage
Adapted from http://cooking.nytimes.com
Recipe by David Latt
Serves 4

Kale, shiitakes and sausage bring a deep earthiness to this quick weeknight recipe, which can also serve as a great base recipe for endless variations depending on ingredient availability and/or personal tastes. Any number of greens or vegetables can be used, as well as various types of mushrooms, and leftover chicken or pork or beef can be used, too. The larger number of garlic and shallots used will insure good flavor, as well as the quality of grated cheese used to garnish. Keep this recipe in your weeknight rotation during these busy autumn weeknights. The leftovers should be awesome as well!  A meatless version is readily made by omitting the sausages and using pasta water instead of stock.

Ingredients:
1 bunch black kale, washed, ribs removed
4 Italian sausages (mild or hot)
½ pound shiitakes (or brown mushrooms), washed, thinly sliced
4 garlic cloves, peeled, finely chopped
4 shallots, peeled, finely chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups chicken stock or pasta water
1 tablespoon sweet butter
 Sea salt and pepper
½ cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese
1 box pasta (spaghetti, ziti, penne, or fusili)
1 tablespoon kosher salt for the pasta

Directions:
Sauté with olive oil or grill the sausages to put a crust on the outside, drain on a paper towel, cut into 1/4-inch rounds, then set aside. In a hot pan lightly brown the kale with the olive oil and remove. Add the shiitakes, shallots, and garlic, and sauté until lightly browned. Turn down the heat to medium. Return the kale to the pan along with the sausages, stock, and butter. Braise for 15 minutes. The liquid should reduce by half.

Make the pasta in boiling salted water, drain (reserve 2 cups of the pasta water if you’re making the vegetarian version), drizzle with olive oil, season with sea salt and black pepper, toss and set aside.

Taste and adjust the seasoning with sea salt and pepper. Add the cooked pasta, toss to coat with the sauce. Serve with grated cheese.

Bonus Recipe
Spicy Thai Pork Tenderloin Salad

Adapted from http://cooking.nytimes.com
Recipe by Melissa Clark
Serves 6 to 8

This is a vibrant, fairly spicy, and tasty main dish salad with quite a few ingredients, but much of it can be done ahead of time~  last minute tossing and grilling make it a great guest-and-host-pleaser. The tenderloin gets marinated using part of the dressing used for the salad, and the cabbage and cucumber and pepper for the salad can be sliced ahead of time and very lightly coated with a bit of the dressing. Try it with chicken or steak~~the marinade will hold up well on most any protein you choose.

Ingredients:

FOR THE MARINADE AND DRESSING:
1 ½ pounds boneless pork tenderloin (usually 2 tenderloins)
⅔ cup thinly sliced shallots (about 4 shallots)
⅔ cup chopped cilantro leaves and tender stems
5 tablespoons light brown sugar
6 garlic cloves, grated
5 tablespoons soy sauce
5 tablespoons peanut or grapeseed oil
 Juice and zest of 4 limes
 3-inch piece peeled ginger root, grated
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
½ teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
1 to 2 Thai bird, serrano or jalapeñochile peppers, seeded and minced
FOR THE SALAD:
8 cups Napa or regular cabbage, thinly sliced
5 whole scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
2 small cucumbers, thinly sliced
1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 ½ cups cilantro leaves
1 ½ cups mint leaves
1 cup basil leaves
1 ¼ cups roasted cashews or peanuts, toasted and chopped
¼ cup unsweetened coconut chips or large flakes, toasted

Directions:
Pat pork dry with paper towel. In a bowl, combine shallot, cilantro, 2 tablespoons of the sugar, garlic, soy sauce, peanut or grapeseed oil, lime zest and juice, ginger, fish sauce, salt and chile. Pour a quarter of the mixture into a blender, add remaining sugar and purée until a smooth, loose paste forms. (Save the unblended mixture to use as dressing.)

Place tenderloin in a large bowl and spread the paste all over pork. Marinate at room temperature for 2 hours, or cover and refrigerate up to 24 hours; turn the tenderloin occasionally.

Light the grill or heat the broiler and arrange a rack at least 4 inches from the heat. Grill or broil pork, turning occasionally, until well browned and meat reaches an internal temperature of 135 degrees, 4 to 10 minutes per side depending upon the heat of your broiler or grill. Keep an eye on it so it doesn’t overcook. Let meat rest while you prepare the salad. (Or, cook the pork 1 or 2 hours ahead and serve it at room temperature.)

In a large bowl, combine the salad ingredients, reserving the herbs, cashews and coconut. Whisk the dressing and use just enough to dress the salad, tossing to combine. Let sit for a few minutes for the flavors to meld, then right before serving, add herbs and toss again.

To serve, slice the pork. Arrange salad on a platter and top with sliced pork. Scatter cashews and coconut on top, drizzle with a little more of the remaining dressing, to taste.