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Thursday, December 29, 2016

News from the SVGM

     The market will be open tomorrow during it's regular hours for your New Year's table needs~~~ It's a very different celebration this weekend: a way to welcome in another new year, and a way to welcome in the hope that the turning of the calendar to January brings each December 31.

     We all wish all of you a very blessed New Year, full of the promise and optimism that New Year's should bring! So celebrate well~~~hug your loved ones, make lots of midnight phone calls if you're still awake (!), and by all means, eat heartily and toast with a bit of champagne~~~

Happy New Year!


This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm: Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms: Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm: Heirloom potatoes, dried herbs and hot peppers, eggs, garlic, Tunis wool
Grass Roots Farm: Pickled garlic scapes, black currant jellies and jams, garlic, parsnips, leeks, celeriac, spinach


Seasonal Recipe
Sauteed Parsnips with Dates and Spiced Yogurt

Adapted from http://foodandwine.com, recipe by Justin Chapple (Published December 2011)
Serves 10

    
 This recipe makes a lot, so you can easily back down the amount of ingredients to serve half as many if you'd like! The inspiration for this recipe came from the chef's visit to a Moroccan restaurant. Sautéing the parsnips to get them nicely caramelized before finishing them in the oven amplifies their inherent sweetness. Enjoy!

Ingredients
3/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
6 garlic cloves, smashed
3 pounds parsnips, peeled and sliced on the diagonal 1/2-inch thick
1 1/2 cups pitted and sliced Medjool dates, about 12
5 marjoram sprigs (can substitute dried)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup plain Greek yogurt
3 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
2 tsps. ground sumac (see note)

Directions

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large skillet, heat the 3/4 cup olive oil with the garlic and cook over moderate heat until the garlic is golden. Using a slotted spoon, remove the garlic and reserve for another use. Add half of the parsnips to the skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden and barely tender, about 12 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the parsnips to a roasting pan. Repeat with the remaining parsnips, then scrape the parsnips and any remaining oil into the roasting pan. Add the dates and the marjoram and season with the salt and pepper, and roast for about 8 minutes, just until the parsnips are tender, and the dates are slightly caramelized. Transfer the parsnips and dates to a serving platter.

In a bowl, whisk the yogurt with the lemon juice, sumac, and remaining 2 Tbsp. olive oil. Season with salt. Serve with the roasted parsnips and dates, passing the spiced yogurt at the table.

Note: Ground sumac is made from a tangy dried berry.  It is available at specialty food stores and Middle Eastern markets, and online at http://chefshop.com.


Thursday, December 22, 2016

News from the SVGM

 It's Winter!~~~ the solstice was yesterday, and blessedly that means that the days will begin lengthening again, even as we officially start into the earth's most dormant season. And for many of us, this sleepy, interior season kicks off with one of the busiest weeks of the year, with the holiday weekend coming up, and New Year's right on its heels.

The market will be open tomorrow with the best our local producers have to offer for your winter holiday tables. We've two weekends in a row of serious feasting and celebrating to do! It's a good time, too, to stock up your freezers with individual cuts of beef, pork, and chicken to keep weekday meal prep handy.

So, a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you all, from all of us here at the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market ~~~ we hope to see you tomorrow to say so in person!  

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm: 
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, specialty cuts 
Cow-a-Hen Farm:
Beef, pork, and poultry
Beaver Run Farms:
Pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm:
Heirloom potatoes, dried herbs and hot peppers, eggs, garlic, Tunis wool
Grass Roots Farm: 
Pickled garlic scapes, black currant jam and jelly, garlic, celeriac, black radishes,
parsnips

Seasonal Recipe
Prune and Almond Braised Short Ribs
Adapted from cooking.nytimes.com, recipe by Joan Nathan (Published 4/13/2011)
Serves 6-8
     This recipe feels like a dish bursting with everything warm and fragrant and enticing: garlic and ginger and lots of red wine and port, fall-off-the-bone meat, and spices tied up in a cheesecloth bag. This is a slow-cooked braising recipe, so allow plenty of time; it also requires a chilling period, overnight would be easiest, in order to skim the fat and finish the dish. And the overnight ending of flavors can only enhance the end result~~~
Ingredients
7 pounds beef short ribs
Salt
Black pepper
1/4 cup rendered duck fat or chicken fat, or canola oil
1 large Spanish onion, diced
3 large carrots, peeled and diced
2 stalks celery, diced
3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
1 1-inch piece ginger, peeled and smashed
2 cups ruby port
2 cups red wine
4 cups pitted prunes
1 1/4 cups slivered almonds, lightly toasted
4 ounces shiitake, crimini, or other mushrooms, diced
1/2 cup loosely packed chopped parsley
2 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
1 stick cinnamon
1 clove
1 star anise
Zest of 1 orange, in strips

Directions
    Heat oven to 325 degrees. Season short ribs with salt and pepper. Place a heavy wide pan over medium-high heat. Add the fat or oil and heat until shimmering. Add beef and brown well on both sides. Transfer to a plate.
Add onion, carrots, celery, garlic and ginger to the pan, and stir until the onions begin to brown, about 3 minutes. Add port and wine, scraping the bottom as you stir. Simmer until reduced by half, about 10 minutes.
    In a large Dutch oven or heavy braising pan, combine 2 cups of the prunes, 1 cup almonds, and the mushrooms. In a piece of cheesecloth, tie up 1/4 cup of the parsley with the thyme, bay leaf, cinnamon, clove,star anise and orange zest, and add to the pot. Add the meat, the vegetable mixture and enough stock to cover. Place over high heat to bring to a boil, then transfer to the oven. Cook, covered, until the meat is falling off the bones, about 2 1/2 hours. Cool completely in the pan, then refrigerate overnight or until well-chilled.
    Skim the fat, then transfer beef to a large bowl, discarding any loose bones. Discard the cheesecloth packet, and transfer remaining broth and vegetables to a food processor. Puree, then return to a clean pan. Add meat and remaining 2 cups whole prunes.
   

Thursday, December 15, 2016

News from the SVGM

My oh my~~~ it is COLD out there! We’re certainly getting a serious pre-blast of winter, with it’s official first day still a week away. I have to admit the snow was a magical one the other night~~~heavy but soft with big fluffy flakes~~~ the kind that feels like a muffling blanket has been thrown over the landscape. I couldn’t resist a late-night walk. I’m not used to seeing a layer of snow this early in the year, it feels like it’s been a while; but last night while out with my dogs, I was grateful for this “snow mulch” on my garden during this severe cold.
Holiday preparations and celebrations still go on, however, and thankfully this looks like a short-term arctic chill! Our produce vendors still have root vegetables, like potatoes and garlic and parsnips~~~indeed, I picked up some of the sweetest parsnips I’ve ever tasted last week, perfect for that ultra-warming soup I said I was making. I also put in an order for my New Year’s pork roast: a reminder that it’s a good idea to pre-order some of the popular holiday cuts of meat; more often than not, our farmers can give you a custom cut or weight if they know ahead of time what you will need. Another perfect match for a holiday appetizer: one or more of Stone Meadow’s cheeses paired with Grass Roots Farm’s Black Currant Jam or Jelly! Stunning.
So stay warm, and stay nourished, and we hope to see you tomorrow~~~
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms: 
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm: 
Heirloom potatoes, sweet potatoes, dried herbs and hot peppers, eggs, garlic, Tunis wool
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, microgreens; dried beans, eggs, potatoes, garlic, cabbage, peppers
Grass Roots Farm:
Pickled garlic scapes, black currant jellies and jams, garlic, celeriac, parsnips, brussels sprouts

Seasonal Recipe
Oven Roasted Chicken with Lemon Rosemary Garlic Butter
 Adapted from foodiecrush.com, recipe published March 5, 2015
Serves 4-6
     Because this weather, and these shorter days, and the hectic pace of the holidays simply require an amazing roasted chicken. This recipe has got aroma and flavor hands down; and if you want leftovers, make the larger chicken, and have sandwiches and the base for soup later on.  
Because sometimes nothing hits the spot like a wonderful roasted chicken~~~~~

Ingredients
1 4-5 pound chicken, giblets & gizzards removed from cavity
2 onions, quartered
1 head of garlic, cut in half plus 3 garlic cloves minced
2 lemons, 1 cut in half and the other cut into slices
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
2 fresh rosemary sprigs plus 1 sprig minced
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
½ cup white wine
Directions
Preheat the oven to 425° and position a rack in the lower third of the oven. Mix the butter with minced rosemary, 3 cloves of minced garlic, lemon zest, salt and pepper.
   
Pat the chicken dry and rub half of the butter, garlic and lemon zest mixture under the skin and the rest
over the chicken and season with salt and pepper. Generously season cavity of chicken with salt and
pepper and stuff with lemon halves, ½ head of garlic, 2-3 quarters of onion and 2 rosemary sprigs. Truss
legs with cooking twine and tuck wings under bird.
   
Place chicken in a roasting pan breast-side-up with the remaining onion, garlic half, sliced lemons and herbs. Add ½ cup of white wine. Roast for 30 minutes or until the breast is firm and just beginning to brown in spots. Using tongs, turn the chicken breast-down, baste with juices and roast for 20 minutes longer, until the skin is lightly browned. Using tongs, turn the chicken breast-side-up and baste again. Add ½ cup of water if wine has evaporated. Roast for about 20 minutes longer, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the inner thigh registers 155° to 160° and juices are running clear.

  
 Transfer the bird to a cutting board and tent with foil. Remove aromatics and vegetables from the cavity, carve the chicken and serve.


Thursday, December 8, 2016

News from the SVGM

   Good afternoon, everybody~~ I hope you’re week has been a good one so far!
I want you to know I try to practice what I preach: I had every intention of going to the market last Friday to buy boatloads of stuff to make myself a huge pot of eat-it-for-five-days vegetable soup, but ended up instead with an unexpected trip to the veterinarian~~~said cat is doing well, thank you. And so I went without soup. A couple of days ago at the grocery store, I looked for a few good green things to hold me over till Friday, but try as our best grocers might, nothing remotely looked as fresh and green as what I’ve still found at the indoor SVGM. The daylight hours are rapidly shortening, the temperatures are soon to drop out of the 30’s and 40’s, and my advice to you is to take advantage of the late-season produce available from our SVGM farmers while you can! Nothing beats the freshness or quality, and our produce vendors are doing their very best to provide as much as they can throughout this holiday season in spite of the dwindling growing hours and temperatures. I’ll also do my best to keep you apprised of what remains available as we move through the month of December, but even the vendors don’t always know what they’ll have, so your best bet is to make it to market Friday afternoons~~~~~ we’re so very appreciative of your patronage and ongoing support; see you there!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms: 
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm: 
Heirloom potatoes, sweet potatoes, greens, radishes, dried herbs and hot peppers, eggs, garlic, Tunis wool
Quaff Meadows: 
Head lettuce, lettuce greens, daikon radishes, butternut squash, turnips, kale, cabbage, onions, carrots, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, eggs, honey, lamb, peanuts
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, microgreens; dried beans, eggs, potatoes, garlic, cabbage, peppers
Grass Roots Farm:
Pickled garlic scapes, black currant jellies and jams, garlic, chard, leeks, carrots, kale, beets, greens, brussels sprouts

Seasonal Recipe
Turnip Casserole with Porcini Crumb Topping
Adapted from foodandwine.com, recipe by Justin Chapel (Published October 2011)
Makes 4 servings
Gratins are by their very nature one of the most satisfying ways to make potatoes and winter vegetables during these blustery cold-weather days. This turnip gratin can be a side dish or a main dish, and leaves plenty of room for your own creative touches. The use of the dried porcini with the panko breadcrumbs for a topping imparts a warm and earthy richness to its creamy flavors~~~~
Ingredients
3 cups heavy cream
1 garlic clove, finely grated
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
3 pounds small turnips, peeled
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
Directions
    Preheat the oven to 375° and butter a shallow 2-quart ceramic baking dish. In a medium saucepan, bring the heavy cream to a simmer. Whisk in the garlic and mustard and season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.
     Using a mandoline, slice the turnips crosswise 1/8 inch thick; otherwise, slice the turnips as thinly as possible with a knife. Arrange half of the turnip slices in the prepared baking dish, overlapping them slightly. Pour half of the cream mixture over the turnips and sprinkle 1/4 cup of the grated cheese on top. Repeat with the remaining turnip slices and cream. Cover tightly with foil and bake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, until the turnips are tender.
    Meanwhile, in a food processor, pulse the porcini until they resemble coarse crumbs. Add the panko and pulse 4 times. Transfer the crumbs to a small bowl and whisk in the remaining 1/4 cup of grated cheese.

    Remove the casserole from the oven and uncover. Sprinkle the porcini crumbs evenly over the top and bake for about 20 minutes, until the cream is bubbling and the top is golden brown. Let stand for 15 minutes before serving.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

News from the SVGM

     The sun is trying its best to peek out from behind the clouds today, and the wind is occasionally gusting, but though it sounds like it's a cold one outside, it's actually still pretty mild for this first day of December. It always feels like we're racing towards that shortest day of the year with a vehemence that has an added urgency, because of the hyper-activity of the holiday season.    
     Social gatherings, decorating, shopping, and stepped-up charitable activities add an extra layer of stress to already full days. So do yourselves a favor, and make sure to put the SVGM indoor Friday markets on your reminder list, because taking care of yourselves should also be a high priority this season. One of the best ways to keep your immune levels up is to buy local foods that are produced with care and a sincere attention to quality. I can't emphasize enough how good it feels to know exactly where your food comes from, and even more, to know exactly who produces it!
    This is the time to get out your slow-cookers and Dutch ovens and soup pots, and nourish yourself and your loved ones with a wonderful, easy, anxiety-soothing one-pot meal. We have pork, beef, poultry, and lamb and all sorts of vegetables for soups and stews~~~and plenty enough for vegetarian main dishes, for sure! Grab some lettuces or broccoli for a side, and dinner is ready. And make enough for leftovers, because this type of food is always even better the second time around.
     Take care of yourselves in the whirlwind out there, and we look forward to seeing you at market~~~~

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms: 
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm: 
Heirloom potatoes, sweet potatoes, greens, radishes, dried herbs and hot peppers, eggs, garlic, Tunis wool
Quaff Meadows: 
Head lettuce, lettuce greens, daikon radishes, butternut squash, turnips, kale, beets, cabbage, onions, carrots, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, eggs, honey, lamb, peanuts
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, microgreens; dried beans, eggs, potatoes, garlic, cabbage, peppers
Grass Roots Farm:
Pickled garlic scapes, black currant jellies and jams, garlic, chard, leeks, carrots, kale, beets, greens, brussels sprouts


Seasonal Recipe
Slow Cooker Ethiopian-Spiced Chicken and Black Lentil Stew
Adapted from foodandwine.com, recipe by Sarah Bolla (Published December 2012)
Makes 4 servings
Though this recipe calls for chicken, it would no doubt be delicious with either pork or beef; and equally delicious as a vegetarian dish with the addition of perhaps sweet potatoes and greens. Berbere is the national spice of Ethiopia, a blend of cayenne and paprika and other fragrant spices such as fenugreek and cardamom. I've never worked with it, but it sounds divine, and warm and spicy helps battle the chill! Here is a link to order it:
Ingredients
1 cup black lentils, rinsed and drained
One 14-ounce can crushed tomatoes
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
4 skinless bone-in chicken thighs, fat trimmed
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 large sweet yellow onion (about 1 1/2 cups), finely chopped 
5 large garlic cloves, finely minced
2 teaspoons freshly grated ginger
1 teaspoon Kosher salt
3 tablespoons Berbere spice
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
1/2 cup white wine 
Freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup Greek yogurt for serving
Fresh cilantro leaves for garnish
Directions
     In a slow cooker, combine the lentils with the crushed tomatoes and chicken broth. Add the chicken and set over high heat.
     Heat the butter and olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions, garlic, ginger, and salt and cook until softened and lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Add the berbere spice and paprika and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add the wine to deglaze the spiced onion mixture from the bottom of the pan, cook for 2 minutes and transfer to the slow cooker. Season the stew generously with salt and black pepper. Cover and cook on high for 2 1/2 hours or on low for 5 hours, until the chicken is cooked through and tender.
     Transfer the chicken and lentils into bowls and serve with a dollop of Greek yogurt and chopped cilantro.
MAKE AHEAD

The stew can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.