.

Welcome!

Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

Want to receive our newsletter?
For a regular reminder in your email inbox, sign up for our email newsletter. Just send an email to svgmarket@gmail.com.

We're on Facebook!
Look on our Facebook page for updates as we have them!

Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 28th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 28th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This is it for the year! Friday afternoon marks the last Growers' Market of the 2011 season, and we'll be taking our winter break. Look for us again in the spring, when the snow has come and gone, and greenery is returning. When we draw closer to that time, you can look for details on both our website and on Facebook. Email newsletters will be on hiatus until we're back in April.

We've got one last recipe to see things out this year. German-style Apples and Cabbage is a perfect cold-weather dish, an easy side dish that's especially great with pork. (Chicken, too.) Served as a hearty side with grilled sausages or seared pork chops, it's a perfect meal for cold weather.

We'd also like to thank our regular musical guests at his year's market, A.J. Bashore and Woody Wolfe, who've been a great accompaniment, through rain and shine. This week, we have Woody and his guitar to send us out. Come over to Ard's and see us one more time!

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 28th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
German-style Apples and Cabbage

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 6

Cabbage and apples are winter food, in no small part because they keep so well, longer than many other fruits and vegetables. Combined, with sweet, sour, and rich flavors, it's a wonderful dish to pair with many things. Pork and chicken have a natural sweetness that works well, though vegetarians can use mushrooms to similar ends. Serve with crusty bread or potatoes cooked until crispy for a balance of textures, and you've got a meal that'll satisfy all winter long.

Ingredients:
  • 4 packed cups thinly sliced cabbage (preferably red)
  • 3 cups apples, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 cup red onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup apple cider
  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1 tsp. caraway seeds
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar, or to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt the butter and cook until the foam subsides. Add the onion and cook until softened, 6-8 minutes.

  2. Add the cabbage, apple, caraway, brown sugar, and cider, and cook, covered, until the cabbage is tender, about 10-12 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add vinegar to taste, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Nothing yet, but we'll post any information about the 2012 Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market as we hammer out the details. Until then, have a wonderful winter!

Thursday, October 20, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 21st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 21st, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It really is down to the end, with just two markets remaining this year. The Growers' Market will be at Ard's this Friday and next, and that's it until next year! With the growing season winding down, there'll be less produce to find locally, but you can still connect with some of our vendors to enjoy local meats, cheeses, and more throughout the winter. Check in with your favorite vendors this week, and ask!

Last week, we had recipes to make eggs into dinner, but we're back to thinking about breakfast now. Try a dark, sweet Whole Wheat Coffee Cake, excellent for early morning or a rustic dessert; or whip together some Multigrain Waffles as part of a Sunday brunch. Both of these are excellent with seasonal fruit, of course. This time of year, it's hard to beat fresh apples. Cored, peel, sliced, and cooked in butter until tender (but not falling apart!), they're a fantastic topping for waffles, pancakes, yogurt... and even for dinner with roast pork or chicken.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 21st, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Coffee Cake

From White Frost Farm

Many whole wheat recipes only call for a portion of the flour to be whole grain, but this version doesn't take shortcuts. It's rich, with a deep molasses sweetness from the brown sugar, and using whole wheat flour gives it an assertive flavor that plain all-purpose just can't compete with.

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 3 eggs
  • 3-¼ cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ tbsp. baking soda
  • ½ tbsp. baking powder
  • 1-½ cups brown sugar
  • 1-½ cups buttermilk
  • ½ cup pecans or walnuts, chopped (optional)
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a bowl, combine the nuts, ½ cup brown sugar, and cinnamon. Set aside.

  2. In a large bowl or stand mixer, cream together the butter and remaining brown sugar. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing until well combined. Add the vanilla. Separately, combine the flour, baking soda, and baking powder; add to the butter mixture in thirds, alternating with buttermilk. Be sure all of the ingredients are combined, with no dry lumps, but take care not to overmix.

  3. Spoon a third of the batter into a greased 12-cup cake or bundt pan. Top with the nut mixture, and then the remaining batter. Bake for approximately 55 minutes, until the cake begins to pull away from the sides. Cool in the pan for 15 minutes, then invert onto a serving plate. Serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Plain pancakes sure make for a handy syrup-delivery vehicle, but when you start adding flavorful whole grains to the batter, they become a lot more interesting. Mixing together whole wheat and other flours can make an easy recipe like Multigrain Waffles a compelling part of a hearty grown-up brunch.

Bonus Recipe, October 21st: Multigrain Waffles

Seasonal Recipe
Multigrain Waffles

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Makes 8 waffles

Waffles require a waffle iron to make, of course, but that texture offers such fine opportunities for crisp edges, for pockets to hold on to butter, syrup, honey, or jam. If you don't have one, you can certainly cook these on a griddle or in a pan, as you would pancakes. They may not have the classic waffle appearance, but they're still awfully delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs
  • 1-½ cups milk or buttermilk, plus more as needed
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole grain flours, such as whole wheat, rye, cornmeal, or oat flour (Mix and match!)
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. In separate bowls, combine dry ingredients and wet ingredients. Pour wet over dry, and stir together until just combined. Don't overmix. If the batter is too thick - waffle batter should be thinner than that for pancakes - add a little extra milk as needed. Cook according to your waffle iron's instructions, and seve immediately.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 14th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 14th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
October is half past, and the 2011 Growers' Market is winding down. Just three more Fridays! The leaves are changing color outdoors, though it might be hard to tell through the fog and rain, and winter's not far off. Rain or shine, you'll find fresh local produce and sustainably raised meats at Ard's this Friday afternoon.

There are days when anything fresh and good would taste great, and there are others when you want something to chase away the weather. Here are a pair of egg recipes that are perfect for a damp, rainy, gray evening, a full meal with crusty bread and a fresh green salad. For a one-dish meal, try Eggs with Lentils and Swiss Chard; or, for a side dish that's a bit of an elegant take on cheesy scrambled eggs, turn on the broiler for some Eggs au Gratin. A little bit of smoked Jack cheese makes it a real treat.

Have you noticed the new t-shirts on the folks at Wild For Salmon? They're helping to fight the proposed Pebble Mine in Alaska that threatens Bristol Bay, one of the last remaining sustainable salmon fishing regions, and 60 miles of river habitat. For more information, about the mine and how you can order a shirt for yourself, check out their recent newsletter, as well as the Native Artists Against Pebble Mine website.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 14th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Eggs with Lentils and Swiss Chard

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4

Eggs, lentils, greens, and crusty bread: it's a simple, filling, and flavorful meal for a busy night. It's adaptable, too. Use any greens you have, like spinach or cabbage in place of the Swiss chard, or replace them with fresh broccoli or cauliflower if you prefer. Try topping each bowl with a poached egg, rather than hard-boiled, for a bit of that runny yolk-y goodness. And if you're feeling a little more carnivorous, a little bit of crumbled sausage, well-browned, or crispy bacon certainly wouldn't be unwelcome.

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup dry lentils
  • 2 eggs, hard-boiled
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 onions, cut into ¼-inch rounds
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, , leaves and stems separated, cut into 1-inch strips
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • Fresh, crusty bread
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cover the lentils in a saucepan with 3 inches water (or stock, if you prefer). Bring to a boil, then simmer until the lentils are tender, about 25 minutes. Drain, reserving the broth.

  2. Meanwhile, heat half of the butter in a large skillet, and cook the onions and the chard stems until the onions are soft and golden, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and chard leaves, along with a splash of the lentil broth, and continue to cook until the chard wilts. Add the lentils, along with a bit more broth, to taste. Stir in the last of the butter as you take the dish off the heat.

  3. Peel and chop the eggs. Spoon the lentils into individual bowls, top with chopped egg, and serve with slices of fresh crusty bread on the side.
* * * * *

On The Website
More uses for hard-boiled eggs! Sometimes it's easy to plow through a dozen eggs, and sometimes you find they've been sitting in the refrigerator all week. Older eggs, when hard-boiled, peel easily, and they're handy to have around for a quick meal. In addition to deviled eggs and salad toppings, we've got one to scratch that cheesy-egg fix: Eggs au Gratin. Make the handful of parts a day or two in advance, and throw the dish together in mere minutes.

Bonus Recipe, October 14th: Eggs au Gratin

Seasonal Recipe
Eggs au Gratin

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

You can make this recipe straight away for dinner, and the most time-consuming part is waiting for the eggs to cook. Hard-boil the eggs ahead of time; make the bechamel sauce in advance; it'll come together in almost no time. You can serve this as a side dish to a substantial meal, or make it a meal in and of itself. Have a good loaf of bread and a fresh green salad handy, and Wednesday night dinner could hardly be simpler.

Ingredients:

  • 8 eggs, hard-boiled
  • 1-¼ cup milk, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup grated cheese (smoked Jack is especially good)
  • ¼ cup minced parsley, for garnish
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Make the bechamel sauce. (You can do this up to two days in advance, if you like, and reheat it gently.) In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. When it stops foaming, add the flour, stirring occasionally until the roux becomes fragrant, but not darkened, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the milk, and place the sauce over medium heat to bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook, without boiling, until it thickens up like a thick cream soup. It should be just thin enough to pour, so add a bit of extra milk to thin as needed.

  2. Preheat the broiler. Use a bit of butter to grease a shallow baking pan or gratin dish, one just big enough to hold the eggs in a single layer. Pour half of the bechamel into the dish, spreading it around evenly. Peel the eggs and slice in half lengthwise, and arrange them in the sauce. Spoon the remaining suace over the top, and sprinkle the cheese over everything.

  3. Broil until the cheese is melted and bubbling, about 3 to 5 minutes. Sprinkle with the parsley, and serve immediately.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 7th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 7th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's coming down to the end of the Growers' Market season, with just a few more Fridays to see us through the end of October! But, hey, at least the sun seems to have returned, and it may or may not be enough to keep the first frosts at bay a little longer. This is the time of year to enjoy warm soups, with freshly made chicken stock; to serve up hearty braises and stews with fresh pork and beef; to season up cooking greens and other vegetables with sweet onions and garlic; and to sop it all up with crusty bread gently warmed in the oven.

Now's the time to indulge in cool-weather vegetables, especially that autumn treat, cauliflower. More delicate in flavor than its close cousin, broccoli, it's particularly sweet after harvest, so be sure to make use of it right away. Since one head is often enough to feed several, we're offering up a trio of recipes this week: Creamy Cauliflower Soup, both easy and warming on a cool evening; Cauliflower & Apple Salad, for a bright, raw crunch (and especially good with crispy bits of bacon); and Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs, which turns a plain, steamed vegetable into something much more interesting. All of these are excellent with broccoli, as well, or with a mix of green and white florets.

We've got music again this week! Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will be at the market with his guitar and good spirits. Come listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 7th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Creamy Cauliflower Soup

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Cauliflower soup is dead simple, and adapts easily to make a fine broccoli cream soup as well. Making a double-size batch is hardly any extra work, and it reheats well. It also takes well to a variety of flavor variations, especially leaning in the direction of India. Try toasting whole cumin seeds in the butter just before adding the vegetables, and spiking the soup with some garam masala or an Indian curry mix.

Ingredients:
  • 1 head cauliflower, florets separated and stems chopped
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 cup cream
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Melt the butter in a large, deep saucepan over medium heat. When hot, add the onion, garlic, cauliflower, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until the onion is softened, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the white wine, and cook for a minute before adding the stock. Bring to a boil, then simmer until the cauliflower is very tender, another 10 to 15 minutes.

  2. Puree the soup with an immersion blender, or allow to cool to a reasonable temperature and send through a food mill or blender. This might take several batches; be very careful with hot liquids in a blender. Add the cream, adjust the seasoning, and reheat gently. Serve warm.
* * * * *

On The Website
Cauliflower and broccoli aren't 100% interchangeable, but for most purposes, they're pretty close. Both are fine raw, able to stand up to assertive flavors, but also come into their own when cooked, even with a simple dip in hot water or steam. For the former, try a mostly-raw Cauliflower & Apple Salad, as a crunchy side dish or simple lunch. Or, spend just a minute or two to dress up plain old steamed cauliflower with Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs, an improvement that's so much more than the effort required.

Bonus Recipe, October 7th: Cauliflower & Apple Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Cauliflower & Apple Salad

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 6

Raw caulifower, like raw broccoli, has a crisp texture and a milder flavor than when cooked. They're excellent in salads rich with lots of flavors, and have a particular affinity for nuts and raisins. And, for those not averse, a bit of crispy bacon, crumbled and mixed in, is quite nice, too.

Ingredients:

  • 6 cup cauliflower or broccoli florets, or a combination
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup walnuts
  • ½ cup red onion, finely diced
  • 1 apple, diced (peeling optional)
  • ¼ cup crumbled crispy bacon
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. cider vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Whisk together the mayonnaise, sugar, and vinegar until thoroughly combined. Toss the remaining ingredients together, and coat evenly with the dressing. Serve chilled.

Bonus Recipe, October 7th: Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs

Seasonal Recipe
Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

This isn't complicated. At all. But cauliflower, when cooked plainly, can tend to the soft and watery side, and a few moments of toasting breadcrumbs in butter adds a great deal of flavor and texture that's a perfect accompaniment to its delicate flavor.

Ingredients:

  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets (about 6 cups)
  • 4 tbsp. butter, or to taste
  • ½ cup breadcrumbs
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Trim and cut the head of cauliflower into florets, being sure to use the stems, too. Just peel them and cut into dice. Steam over boiling water until tender, but still a bit firm, 5 to 8 minutes. (Cooking the whole head will take almost triple the time.)

  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the breadcrumbs when the butter is hot, and the foam has subsided, and stirr frequently until the breadcrumbs are toasted and the butter nice and nutty. Toss in the cooked cauliflower, stirring to coat. Serve immediately.