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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 26th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 26th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's the end of August at the Growers' Market, and though we've been seeing more and more of fall's vegetables appearing - the cabbages, potatoes, carrots, and onions that linger through the winter, for the rich and hearty stews, braises, and other dishes that ward off the January chill - there's plenty of summer produce to last for weeks before frost. Melons, tomatoes, peppers, corn and more, it's that season of overlap, where we get a little of everything, all together. Enjoy it while it's here!

It's here and it's fresh, so now's the time to set aside some of the summer's bounty for preserving. Canning tomatoes and freezing corn are fine options, and another real treat - something special in midwinter - is a fragrant, delicious Basil Pesto. Make a big batch, take enough to enjoy now, and freeze the rest for the future, when basil's no longer fresh and plentiful. You can even spread it on a few savory Jalapeno & Cheddar Muffins, in lieu of butter or jam. They're fine for breakfast, but also work well as side dish for a dinner made with fresh tomatoes, sweet corn, and the other flavors of summer. Try them along with grilled or roast pork, or chop and toast them - any leftovers, that is - and use them as a flavorful stuffing for roast chicken.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 26th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Jalapeno & Cheddar Muffins

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Makes 10-12 muffins

Muffins are quick and easy, and can be sweet, savory, or even a little of both, to suit your taste and the rest of the meal you'll enjoy them with. This recipe leans savory, but you can certainly increase the sweetness with the addition of a bit of extra honey, or by replacing the hot peppers with sweet bells, instead. There's also room enough for a cup's worth of corn kernels, if you're so inclined.

Ingredients:
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • 2-½ tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 1-½ tbsp. honey
  • 1 to 2 cups grated cheddar cheese
  • ½ cup jalapeno peppers, finely diced
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease a set of muffin tins. Combine the dry ingredients - flours, cornmeal, baking powder, salt - in a large bowl. In another bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, honey and butter. Pour the wet over the dry, stirring until just combined. Fold in about three-quarters of the cheddar and the jalapeno peppers. Spoon into muffin tins, about three-quarters full, and sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top.

  2. Bake until the muffins are brown and a toothpick in the center comes out clean. Serve while still warm, or split and toast to reheat.
* * * * *

On The Website
Basil Pesto is a simple, but intensely flavorful dressing for pasta, a sandwich spread, a quick way to add something special to a simple soup. Make it now, when you can get loads of basil fresh and sweet, and freeze the rest for future meals.

Bonus Recipe, August 26th: Basil Pesto


Seasonal Recipe
Basil Pesto

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Makes about 1 cup

Traditional pesto is a simple sauce, a combination of basil, garlic, pine nuts, and olive oil. Parmesan cheese, while delicious, is optional, and really, it's all flexible and adjustable to taste. Try it with roasted garlic for sweetness, or grilled garlic for a subtle smokiness. Replace all or part of the basil with other herbs - such as cilantro, parsley, or mint - for a different flavor.

You can also swap out the expensive pine nuts for another. Walnuts have a more assertive flavor, but are a fine choice; just be aware that walnut-based pesto turns darker, and faster, than one made with pine nuts. Really, it's just the way of pesto, as the chemical compounds that make basil taste like, well, basil, are the same ones that cause it to lose its bright green color when tossed with pasta. More browning occurs when you include the stems and leaf bases in the pesto, so you can reduce that by pinching them off as you go. (Stems are the easy ones; leaf bases are hardly worth the effort.)

When you have the chance, make extra pesto. It freezes especially well. Separate it into small portions that you'll use quickly, and they'll thaw in no time, ready for pasta, sandwiches, salad dressings, you name it. Muffin tins - regular or mini size - lined with plastic wrap are great for portioning.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups basil leaves, loosely packed
  • 1 or 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tbsp. pine nuts or walnuts
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients, except forthe cheese and about half of the olive oil, in a food processor. Process, scraping down the sides from time to time, and add the remaining oil gradually. If you like it thinner, add extra oil to achieve that consistency. Stir in the Parmesan just before serving, if using.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 19th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 19th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
For those who have missed them during the long Alaskan fishing season, you can look forward to Wild For Salmon's return at this week's Growers' Market! Following a successful summer in Bristol Bay, they're back in Pennsylvania with the catch. You can read up on their 2011 exploits in their newsletter, or stop by to chat in person. This year, they'll have the usual fillets and portions, hot- and cold-smoked salmon, as flavored burgers, sausages, and spreads.

Do you have friends, neighbors, or family members over 60 who might benefit from the PA Farmer's Market Voucher Program? Low-income residents of Union and Snyder county have the opportunity to receive free vouchers to purchase fresh, Pennsylvania-grown fruits and vegetables from local farmers' markets, including from the SVGM. The final opportunity for this year will be at the Lewisburg Senior Center, 116 N. 2nd St, on Friday, August 19th, from 8:30 to 12:00. If you think you, or someone you know, might be eligible, please check out this flyer for more details.

It's hard not to get salmon on the brain, so we've picked out a pair of recipes to pair the freshly-caught fish with some of the fresh produce at this week's market. Try adding a little color and spice with a Hawaiian-inspired Poached Salmon with Fruit Salsa, combining fresh peaches, tomatoes, onions and peppers for a sweet-spicy dish that's excellent served hot or cold. Or pull out the grill (or fire up the broiler when the skies threaten) for Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes, and enjoy the late summer weather.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 19th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Poached Salmon with Fruit Salsa

Adapted from Sam Choy's Island Flavors by Sam Choy (Hyperion, 1999)
Serves 4

Poaching salmon, by cooking it gently in simmering liquid, allows a bit of flexibility in serving. Unlike cooking fish on the grill, under the broiler, or in a skillet, poached salmon is actually quite tasty when served cold. You can certainly prepare the salmon by other methods, as well, as suits your taste.

The salsa here calls for peaches, and tomatoes, since they're fresh and in season. That said, any combination of sweet and sour, with enough spiciness to add liveliness, would be perfect here. Adjust the ingredients based on what you have, and make more than you need; extra salsa's good with pork, chicken, or simply with plain old tortilla chips.

Ingredients:
  • 4 salmon fillet portions
  • 1 cup diced peaches
  • 1 cup diced tomatoes
  • ½ cup diced red onion
  • ½ cup diced bell peppers, hot peppers, or a mixture
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • Fresh lime juice, to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place the salmon, skin side down, in a pan large enough to accommodate it without overlapping. cover with cold, well-salted water. (You can also use stock, wine, or any flavorful liquid you like.) Cover the pan tightly. Bring to a boil, and immediately shut off the heat. Allow the salmon to rest in the hot water until cooked through, about 10 minutes. Check for doneness with a thin-bladed knife, taking care to avoid overcooking. Remove from the water, drain, and, if serving cold, chill until needed.

  2. Toss together the peaches, tomatoes, peppers, onion, and cilantro. Adjust to taste with fresh lime juice, salt and pepper. Spoon over the salmon fillets before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Salmon can stand up to the grill, which is a challenge that few fish are up to. Use that heat to flavor up the salmon and some sweet, fresh produce in a recipe for Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes. Try it with some freshly dug potatoes and plenty of garlic for a real taste of summer!

Bonus Recipe, August 19th: Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes

Serves 4

Salmon's wonderful on the grill, and if you want to get the most out of this recipe, you'll want to work with very hot coals, keeping a close eye on it all the whole time. Don't be afraid to scorch the skin on the tomatoes, potatoes, or garlic; after peeling away any burnt bits, you'll be left with a wonderful smokiness that permeates the entire dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ lbs. salmon fillets
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes
  • 1-½ lbs. small, waxy potatoes
  • 1 head garlic
  • 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup plus 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, thinly sliced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Before heating the grill, prepare the potatoes. Boil or steam the spuds whole, until tender when pierced with a knife, 20 to 40 minutes, depending on size. Refrigerate until needed.

  2. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill (or a broiler, if necessary). Meanwhile, prepare the salmon and vegetables. Spear the tomatoes on kebab skewers; do the same for the cloves of garlic, leaving the paper husk on. This will prevent the garlic from burning over the heat. Cut the salmon into approximately 1-½- to 2-inch pieces, place on skewers, drizzle with the 2 tbsp. olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. If the cooked potatoes are too small for the grill grate, skewer them as well.

  3. Cook the garlic first, close to the hot coals or flame, turning regularly. The outer husk will char, but the garlic will be cooked to a soft, smoky sweetness when you can feel the cloves softened inside. (Squeeze gently.) Cook the tomatoes until soft, their skins splitting, and the potatoes until the skins are nicely browned and the flesh heated. Cook the salmon until done, about 8 to 10 minutes, depending on the heat and size of the pieces. As they come off the grill, toss the potatoes, tomatoes, and salmon into a bowl, letting them rest a few minutes while you prepare the dressing.

  4. Squeeze the cooked garlic from the cloves, and mash in a mortar or with the back of a fork. Combine with the remaining olive oil, mustard, lemon juice, and seasoning to taste. Pour over the other ingredients, tossing to combine, and add the basil at the last minute. Serve immediately.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 12th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 12th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Garlic season is upon us at the Growers' Market! There are plenty of varieties to choose from, each with differences in size, in flavor, in the white-and-purple patterning on their skin. Some are best when raw; others when sauteed; and others turn exceptionally sweet when roasted. So sweet, in fact, that you can even pick up a fine, jelly-style Garlic Glaze from White Frost Farm. It's ideal for dressing roast or grilled pork, a sweet-savory addition that's perfect with leaner cuts like pork tenderloin.

It's all garlic recipes this week: Chicken and 40 Cloves is the classic all-garlic-all-the-time dish, and one of the very few recipes where you can never have too much garlic. The "40 cloves" may seem a bit excessive, but once you have all that slow-cooked garlic and flavorful, garlic-infused olive oil, don't be surprised if you wish you'd doubled it. For a somewhat less insistent, but still richly-flavored dish, consider Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic. Right now, the potatoes are freshly dug, and the garlic cured and full of flavor, but it continues to be a fine, seasonal recipe for months with these long-keeping vegetables.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 12th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and 40 Cloves

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Forty cloves of garlic seems like an awful lot, but really, it isn't. At least, not when left whole and gently roasted in olive oil, which turns its pungent spiciness into a deep, rich sweetness, and its crisp texture to meltingly soft. Once cooked this way, any extra garlic can be used to season other recipes, too. It's great in a fresh tomato sauce for pasta, spread for a sandwich, or in the recipe for Potato and Roasted Garlic Soup, on our website.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole chicken, about 4 lbs., cut into pieces
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • ¼ cup olive oil, plus more for browning the chicken
  • 3 large heads garlic, or as much as you like
  • 1 tbsp. chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, or savory
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rub the chicken pieces with the herbs, salt and pepper. Rest for at least an hour or two in the refrigerator, if you have the time. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Separate the garlic cloves, but don't peel; the finished garlic will easily squeeze out from its papery skin.

  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the chicken pieces on all sides, doing so in batches to avoid crowding. Arrange the pieces, along with any juices, in an large ovenproof casserole with a lid. (If you don't have a lid, cover very tightly with foil.) Add the garlic cloves, stock, wine, and olive oil. Cover, and cook in the oven until the chicken is fully cooked through, about an hour or more.

  3. Serve the chicken immediately, or keep warm while turning the pan juices into a gravy. (A few mashed cloves of garlic make an excellent thickener.) Serve with plenty of fresh bread, to enjoy the roasted garlic.
* * * * *

On The Website
Simple, but always delicious, a pot of Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic can be an easy soup to start a meal, or the very centerpiece. Leave it simple, or garnish with chopped fresh tomatoes or cooked fresh greens, with fresh bread to clean up the bottom of the bowl.

And, of course, where would we be without Roasted Garlic? It's so simple, but so sweet, rich, and useful, that not having a recipe would be a real shame.

Bonus Recipe, August 12th: Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic

Seasonal Recipe
Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Potato soup could hardly be easier. Use whatever sort of potatoes you like, as long as they're fresh and flavorful. Starchy baking potatoes tend to fall apart, lending a creamy body to the soup, while fingerlings and other waxy varieties hold their shape. You can mix and match, too, to enrich the body while still having substantial pieces in the finished soup.

Peeling is optional, too, depending on your preference, and you can always remove them at the end by passing everything through a food mill. (This works well if you don't feel like peeling your garlic, either.)

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp. butter or olive oil
  • 2 onions, finely diced
  • 2 or 3 bay leaves
  • 2 lb. potatoes, peeled (optional) and chopped
  • 2 heads roasted garlic
  • 2 quarts plus 1 cup water or stock
  • 2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a heavy pot over medium heat, melt the butter. When the foam subsides, add the onions and bay leaves, stirring occasionally until they soften. Add the potatoes and raise the heat. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring frequently, and add 1 cup water. Scrape the bottom to loosen up any flavorful brown bits.

  2. Add the remaining water and the garlic, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partly covered, until the potatoes are soft, about 20 to 30 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and check the seasoning. If you like, pass the soup through a food mill, and serve immediately, garnished with the fresh parsley.

Bonus Recipe, August 12th: Roasted Garlic

Seasonal Recipe
Roasted Garlic


Roasting garlic turns its sulfurous pungency into a deep sweetness, and changes the texture into something not unlike softened butter. The more the cells of the garlic cloves are damaged, and the less it's cooked, the hotter the flavor, which is why just one or two cloves can give a batch of basil pesto such a bracing garlic flavor. Here, the cloves are left intact, and cooked slowly, for a long time, bringing out a natural sweetness that's even made its way into cookie recipes!

Ingredients:

  • Garlic cloves
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Separate the cloves from the head, removing the loose outer layers of papery skin. Peeling now is optional; when finished, simply squeezing the cooked cloves is enough to pop out the buttery garlic. Arrange the cloves in a ramekin or other ovenproof dish just big enough to hold them. More than one layer is okay. Add a pinch of salt, and pour over olive oil to cover. Wrap the top tightly with foil, and bake for at least an hour, until the garlic is tender but not starting to fry crisp. (Squeeze a clove with tongs to check.)

  2. Allow the garlic to cool, and remove the cloves from the oil. Strain, if necessary, and reserve for future recipes; garlic oil's full of flavor. It's excellent for sauteing vegetables, for richly flavored vinaigrettes, or for a last-minute drizzle for soups, roasts, grileld vegetables, what have you. The garlic cloves can be refrigerated until needed for recipes, or for making some really excellent garlic bread.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 5th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 5th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is here at the Growers' Market! In addition to all of the fresh vegetables that have been appearing at the market for the past several weeks, you can now find fresh edamame. Tender, young soybeans, they're excellent lightly boiled and salted. The cooked beans pop out of their pods easily, so much so that even picky kids can get a kick out of eating "squeezy beans."

Don't overlook the fresh fruit at the market! Ripe peaches and plums are wonderful eaten out of hand - though perhaps with a napkin to catch the drips. They also make for fine summer desserts, like a Peach Cobbler or a Plum Crisp. Or perhaps plum cobbler and peach crisp. Or, while they're fresh, try substituting sour plums, which are to a sweet plum as a sour cherry is to a sweet cherry. You'll need to adjust the sweetness to offset the tartness of the fruit, but their more complex flavor is well worth the experience of trying something new.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 5th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Peach Cobbler

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6

Cobblers are one of the classic, beloved American desserts, and one better suited to soft, juicy fruits than a pie. With a sweet biscuit topping, there's no soggy bottom crust; there's no need to thicken the fruit filling excessively, either, which means a more flavorful dessert all around. Serve room temperature or still warm from the oven, with or without ice cream.

Skinning the peaches is preferable, but optional if you're not so inclined. If you don't want to bother peeling - by scoring the skin and blanching briefly in boiling water - just be sure to slice the peaches thinly enough that the skins remain unnoticeable. Other fine fruits for cobblers, in season, include plums, blueberries, apricots, cherries, apples, pears, or any combination that sounds good.


Ingredients:
  • 1-¾ cups all-purpose or whole-wheat flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • ½ cup honey
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 6 tbsp. cold butter, cut into pieces
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ tsp. vanilla
  • 6 - 8 cups ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • Zest and juice of a lemon
  • 1 egg, beaten, or 1 tbsp. milk (optional)
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. While the oven heats, combine the peaches, ¼ cup flour, honey, cinnamon, lemon juice and zest in a bowl, stirring to combine. Set aside while you prepare the cobbler topping.

  2. Mix together the remaining flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, and salt. Cut in the butter until it resembles coarse crumbs, and mix in the buttermilk and vanilla, gently, just until it all presses together easily. Take care not to overwork the dough.

  3. Pour the peach mixture into an 8x8 pan or other baking dish. Using your hands or a spoon, drop the cobbler topping over the surface covering most (but not all) of the fruit. Alternately, you can roll out the dough and cut it into shapes, like biscuits. Brush the top with beaten egg or milk, and slide into the oven over a baking sheet to catch any drips. Bake for 25 - 30 minutes, until the fruit is cooked and bubbling, and the topping is nicely browned. Set aside to cool for a few minutes, and serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Even easier than a cobbler: a Plum Crisp. Crisps are just as flexible in their fillings, but have the added bonus of being able to prepare - and freeze - the topping well in advance, for a quick and easy summer dessert that you can put together in the time it takes to preheat the oven.

Bonus Recipe, August 5th: Plum Crisp

Seasonal Recipe
Plum Crisp

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6

Crisps are dead-easy summer desserts, simply sweetened slices of fruit topped with a mix of butter, sugar, flour and oats that turns into crunchy topping after baking. Most any fruit works, though a crisp is an ideal use for softer fruits, like peaches and plums, that often refuse to hold together well enough for a slice of pie.

The topping here freezes beautifully, so it's worth the effort to make a double (or triple) batch while you're at it. Simply pull the frozen topping from the freezer, and crumble over the fruit. There's no need to thaw before popping it in the oven, so you can throw together dessert in less time than it takes the oven to preheat.

Ingredients:

  • 6 tbsp. butter, in chunks
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup flour
  • ½ cup rolled oats
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 3 lb. plums, pitted and quartered
  • ¼ cup honey
  • Zest of an orange
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Toss together the plums, honey, and orange zest in a bowl, and rest while you prepare the topping.

  2. Using your fingertips, or a stand mixer with paddle attachment, mix together the butter, brown sugar, flour, oats, salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon, until it's a coarse, crumbly mixture. Pour the plums into an 8x8 baking dish, and scatter the crisp topping over. Place on a baking sheet to catch any drips. Bake until the fruit bubbles and the topping is brown and crisp, about 1 hour. Serve warm or at room temperature.