.

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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 28th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 28th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This is it for the year! Friday afternoon marks the last Growers' Market of the 2011 season, and we'll be taking our winter break. Look for us again in the spring, when the snow has come and gone, and greenery is returning. When we draw closer to that time, you can look for details on both our website and on Facebook. Email newsletters will be on hiatus until we're back in April.

We've got one last recipe to see things out this year. German-style Apples and Cabbage is a perfect cold-weather dish, an easy side dish that's especially great with pork. (Chicken, too.) Served as a hearty side with grilled sausages or seared pork chops, it's a perfect meal for cold weather.

We'd also like to thank our regular musical guests at his year's market, A.J. Bashore and Woody Wolfe, who've been a great accompaniment, through rain and shine. This week, we have Woody and his guitar to send us out. Come over to Ard's and see us one more time!

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 28th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
German-style Apples and Cabbage

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 6

Cabbage and apples are winter food, in no small part because they keep so well, longer than many other fruits and vegetables. Combined, with sweet, sour, and rich flavors, it's a wonderful dish to pair with many things. Pork and chicken have a natural sweetness that works well, though vegetarians can use mushrooms to similar ends. Serve with crusty bread or potatoes cooked until crispy for a balance of textures, and you've got a meal that'll satisfy all winter long.

Ingredients:
  • 4 packed cups thinly sliced cabbage (preferably red)
  • 3 cups apples, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 cup red onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup apple cider
  • ¼ cup cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 1 tsp. caraway seeds
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar, or to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt the butter and cook until the foam subsides. Add the onion and cook until softened, 6-8 minutes.

  2. Add the cabbage, apple, caraway, brown sugar, and cider, and cook, covered, until the cabbage is tender, about 10-12 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add vinegar to taste, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Nothing yet, but we'll post any information about the 2012 Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market as we hammer out the details. Until then, have a wonderful winter!

Thursday, October 20, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 21st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 21st, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It really is down to the end, with just two markets remaining this year. The Growers' Market will be at Ard's this Friday and next, and that's it until next year! With the growing season winding down, there'll be less produce to find locally, but you can still connect with some of our vendors to enjoy local meats, cheeses, and more throughout the winter. Check in with your favorite vendors this week, and ask!

Last week, we had recipes to make eggs into dinner, but we're back to thinking about breakfast now. Try a dark, sweet Whole Wheat Coffee Cake, excellent for early morning or a rustic dessert; or whip together some Multigrain Waffles as part of a Sunday brunch. Both of these are excellent with seasonal fruit, of course. This time of year, it's hard to beat fresh apples. Cored, peel, sliced, and cooked in butter until tender (but not falling apart!), they're a fantastic topping for waffles, pancakes, yogurt... and even for dinner with roast pork or chicken.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 21st, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Coffee Cake

From White Frost Farm

Many whole wheat recipes only call for a portion of the flour to be whole grain, but this version doesn't take shortcuts. It's rich, with a deep molasses sweetness from the brown sugar, and using whole wheat flour gives it an assertive flavor that plain all-purpose just can't compete with.

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 3 eggs
  • 3-¼ cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ tbsp. baking soda
  • ½ tbsp. baking powder
  • 1-½ cups brown sugar
  • 1-½ cups buttermilk
  • ½ cup pecans or walnuts, chopped (optional)
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a bowl, combine the nuts, ½ cup brown sugar, and cinnamon. Set aside.

  2. In a large bowl or stand mixer, cream together the butter and remaining brown sugar. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing until well combined. Add the vanilla. Separately, combine the flour, baking soda, and baking powder; add to the butter mixture in thirds, alternating with buttermilk. Be sure all of the ingredients are combined, with no dry lumps, but take care not to overmix.

  3. Spoon a third of the batter into a greased 12-cup cake or bundt pan. Top with the nut mixture, and then the remaining batter. Bake for approximately 55 minutes, until the cake begins to pull away from the sides. Cool in the pan for 15 minutes, then invert onto a serving plate. Serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Plain pancakes sure make for a handy syrup-delivery vehicle, but when you start adding flavorful whole grains to the batter, they become a lot more interesting. Mixing together whole wheat and other flours can make an easy recipe like Multigrain Waffles a compelling part of a hearty grown-up brunch.

Bonus Recipe, October 21st: Multigrain Waffles

Seasonal Recipe
Multigrain Waffles

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Makes 8 waffles

Waffles require a waffle iron to make, of course, but that texture offers such fine opportunities for crisp edges, for pockets to hold on to butter, syrup, honey, or jam. If you don't have one, you can certainly cook these on a griddle or in a pan, as you would pancakes. They may not have the classic waffle appearance, but they're still awfully delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs
  • 1-½ cups milk or buttermilk, plus more as needed
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole grain flours, such as whole wheat, rye, cornmeal, or oat flour (Mix and match!)
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. In separate bowls, combine dry ingredients and wet ingredients. Pour wet over dry, and stir together until just combined. Don't overmix. If the batter is too thick - waffle batter should be thinner than that for pancakes - add a little extra milk as needed. Cook according to your waffle iron's instructions, and seve immediately.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 14th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 14th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
October is half past, and the 2011 Growers' Market is winding down. Just three more Fridays! The leaves are changing color outdoors, though it might be hard to tell through the fog and rain, and winter's not far off. Rain or shine, you'll find fresh local produce and sustainably raised meats at Ard's this Friday afternoon.

There are days when anything fresh and good would taste great, and there are others when you want something to chase away the weather. Here are a pair of egg recipes that are perfect for a damp, rainy, gray evening, a full meal with crusty bread and a fresh green salad. For a one-dish meal, try Eggs with Lentils and Swiss Chard; or, for a side dish that's a bit of an elegant take on cheesy scrambled eggs, turn on the broiler for some Eggs au Gratin. A little bit of smoked Jack cheese makes it a real treat.

Have you noticed the new t-shirts on the folks at Wild For Salmon? They're helping to fight the proposed Pebble Mine in Alaska that threatens Bristol Bay, one of the last remaining sustainable salmon fishing regions, and 60 miles of river habitat. For more information, about the mine and how you can order a shirt for yourself, check out their recent newsletter, as well as the Native Artists Against Pebble Mine website.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 14th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Eggs with Lentils and Swiss Chard

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4

Eggs, lentils, greens, and crusty bread: it's a simple, filling, and flavorful meal for a busy night. It's adaptable, too. Use any greens you have, like spinach or cabbage in place of the Swiss chard, or replace them with fresh broccoli or cauliflower if you prefer. Try topping each bowl with a poached egg, rather than hard-boiled, for a bit of that runny yolk-y goodness. And if you're feeling a little more carnivorous, a little bit of crumbled sausage, well-browned, or crispy bacon certainly wouldn't be unwelcome.

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup dry lentils
  • 2 eggs, hard-boiled
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 onions, cut into ¼-inch rounds
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, , leaves and stems separated, cut into 1-inch strips
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • Fresh, crusty bread
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cover the lentils in a saucepan with 3 inches water (or stock, if you prefer). Bring to a boil, then simmer until the lentils are tender, about 25 minutes. Drain, reserving the broth.

  2. Meanwhile, heat half of the butter in a large skillet, and cook the onions and the chard stems until the onions are soft and golden, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and chard leaves, along with a splash of the lentil broth, and continue to cook until the chard wilts. Add the lentils, along with a bit more broth, to taste. Stir in the last of the butter as you take the dish off the heat.

  3. Peel and chop the eggs. Spoon the lentils into individual bowls, top with chopped egg, and serve with slices of fresh crusty bread on the side.
* * * * *

On The Website
More uses for hard-boiled eggs! Sometimes it's easy to plow through a dozen eggs, and sometimes you find they've been sitting in the refrigerator all week. Older eggs, when hard-boiled, peel easily, and they're handy to have around for a quick meal. In addition to deviled eggs and salad toppings, we've got one to scratch that cheesy-egg fix: Eggs au Gratin. Make the handful of parts a day or two in advance, and throw the dish together in mere minutes.

Bonus Recipe, October 14th: Eggs au Gratin

Seasonal Recipe
Eggs au Gratin

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

You can make this recipe straight away for dinner, and the most time-consuming part is waiting for the eggs to cook. Hard-boil the eggs ahead of time; make the bechamel sauce in advance; it'll come together in almost no time. You can serve this as a side dish to a substantial meal, or make it a meal in and of itself. Have a good loaf of bread and a fresh green salad handy, and Wednesday night dinner could hardly be simpler.

Ingredients:

  • 8 eggs, hard-boiled
  • 1-¼ cup milk, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup grated cheese (smoked Jack is especially good)
  • ¼ cup minced parsley, for garnish
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Make the bechamel sauce. (You can do this up to two days in advance, if you like, and reheat it gently.) In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. When it stops foaming, add the flour, stirring occasionally until the roux becomes fragrant, but not darkened, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the milk, and place the sauce over medium heat to bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook, without boiling, until it thickens up like a thick cream soup. It should be just thin enough to pour, so add a bit of extra milk to thin as needed.

  2. Preheat the broiler. Use a bit of butter to grease a shallow baking pan or gratin dish, one just big enough to hold the eggs in a single layer. Pour half of the bechamel into the dish, spreading it around evenly. Peel the eggs and slice in half lengthwise, and arrange them in the sauce. Spoon the remaining suace over the top, and sprinkle the cheese over everything.

  3. Broil until the cheese is melted and bubbling, about 3 to 5 minutes. Sprinkle with the parsley, and serve immediately.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

News from the SVGM - October 7th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 7th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's coming down to the end of the Growers' Market season, with just a few more Fridays to see us through the end of October! But, hey, at least the sun seems to have returned, and it may or may not be enough to keep the first frosts at bay a little longer. This is the time of year to enjoy warm soups, with freshly made chicken stock; to serve up hearty braises and stews with fresh pork and beef; to season up cooking greens and other vegetables with sweet onions and garlic; and to sop it all up with crusty bread gently warmed in the oven.

Now's the time to indulge in cool-weather vegetables, especially that autumn treat, cauliflower. More delicate in flavor than its close cousin, broccoli, it's particularly sweet after harvest, so be sure to make use of it right away. Since one head is often enough to feed several, we're offering up a trio of recipes this week: Creamy Cauliflower Soup, both easy and warming on a cool evening; Cauliflower & Apple Salad, for a bright, raw crunch (and especially good with crispy bits of bacon); and Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs, which turns a plain, steamed vegetable into something much more interesting. All of these are excellent with broccoli, as well, or with a mix of green and white florets.

We've got music again this week! Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will be at the market with his guitar and good spirits. Come listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 7th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Creamy Cauliflower Soup

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Cauliflower soup is dead simple, and adapts easily to make a fine broccoli cream soup as well. Making a double-size batch is hardly any extra work, and it reheats well. It also takes well to a variety of flavor variations, especially leaning in the direction of India. Try toasting whole cumin seeds in the butter just before adding the vegetables, and spiking the soup with some garam masala or an Indian curry mix.

Ingredients:
  • 1 head cauliflower, florets separated and stems chopped
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 cup cream
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Melt the butter in a large, deep saucepan over medium heat. When hot, add the onion, garlic, cauliflower, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until the onion is softened, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the white wine, and cook for a minute before adding the stock. Bring to a boil, then simmer until the cauliflower is very tender, another 10 to 15 minutes.

  2. Puree the soup with an immersion blender, or allow to cool to a reasonable temperature and send through a food mill or blender. This might take several batches; be very careful with hot liquids in a blender. Add the cream, adjust the seasoning, and reheat gently. Serve warm.
* * * * *

On The Website
Cauliflower and broccoli aren't 100% interchangeable, but for most purposes, they're pretty close. Both are fine raw, able to stand up to assertive flavors, but also come into their own when cooked, even with a simple dip in hot water or steam. For the former, try a mostly-raw Cauliflower & Apple Salad, as a crunchy side dish or simple lunch. Or, spend just a minute or two to dress up plain old steamed cauliflower with Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs, an improvement that's so much more than the effort required.

Bonus Recipe, October 7th: Cauliflower & Apple Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Cauliflower & Apple Salad

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 6

Raw caulifower, like raw broccoli, has a crisp texture and a milder flavor than when cooked. They're excellent in salads rich with lots of flavors, and have a particular affinity for nuts and raisins. And, for those not averse, a bit of crispy bacon, crumbled and mixed in, is quite nice, too.

Ingredients:

  • 6 cup cauliflower or broccoli florets, or a combination
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup walnuts
  • ½ cup red onion, finely diced
  • 1 apple, diced (peeling optional)
  • ¼ cup crumbled crispy bacon
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. cider vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Whisk together the mayonnaise, sugar, and vinegar until thoroughly combined. Toss the remaining ingredients together, and coat evenly with the dressing. Serve chilled.

Bonus Recipe, October 7th: Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs

Seasonal Recipe
Cauliflower with Bread Crumbs

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

This isn't complicated. At all. But cauliflower, when cooked plainly, can tend to the soft and watery side, and a few moments of toasting breadcrumbs in butter adds a great deal of flavor and texture that's a perfect accompaniment to its delicate flavor.

Ingredients:

  • 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets (about 6 cups)
  • 4 tbsp. butter, or to taste
  • ½ cup breadcrumbs
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Trim and cut the head of cauliflower into florets, being sure to use the stems, too. Just peel them and cut into dice. Steam over boiling water until tender, but still a bit firm, 5 to 8 minutes. (Cooking the whole head will take almost triple the time.)

  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the breadcrumbs when the butter is hot, and the foam has subsided, and stirr frequently until the breadcrumbs are toasted and the butter nice and nutty. Toss in the cooked cauliflower, stirring to coat. Serve immediately.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 30th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 30th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Well, here we are at the very end of September for the Growers' Market, with just a month of autumn weather to see us out for the 2011 season. Now is the time to think about stocking up the freezer with local, sustainable meats for winter-long enjoyment; to remember to pick up enough local, organic whole-wheat flour for baking; and to ask our vendors how to find them once the weather's no longer suitable for an outdoor market. Several of our vendors offer winter deliveries, or make their products available through a number of local businesses. Don't forget to ask!

Rain or shine, our vendors will be at the market, but these rainy days call for food that's warm, filling, and comforting. It might not be cold out yet, but there's nothing quite like a hot bowl of soup to chase away the damp. Looking in the direction of Japan for this week's recipes, we have a Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup, a far Eastern version of the classic dish. All around the world, there are variations on chicken noodle, and this one reflects the simple elegance that informs Japanese cuisine. More familiar, perhaps, but just as Japanese, is a recipe for Salmon Teriyaki, which uses a simple but delicious marinade and glaze to complement the fish's natural richness.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 30th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Salmon Teriyaki

Adapted from The Cook's Encyclopedia of Japanese Cooking by Emi Kazuko (Barnes & Noble, 2003)
Serves 4

Salmon teriyaki may well be one of the best-known Japanese dishes in the West. A sweetened mix of soy sauce and sake marinates, then glazes salmon fillets, which take on an appealing glossy brown shine. It's an excellent first step into Japanese food for novices who might be put off by the notion of raw fish in nigiri sushi, or find themselves lost amid the sometimes bewildering array of ingredients that are common to people half a world away.

Much of Japanese cuisine is quite seasonal, with vegetables often simply prepared to let their freshness shine. Serve this salmon with an array of fresh autumn vegetables, especially if you can find a bright mix of colors for the plate.

Ingredients:
  • Four salmon fillet portions, about 5 oz. each, skin on
  • 3 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp. sake
  • 3 tbsp. mirin
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
Directions:
  1. Mix together the soy sauce, sake, mirin, and half of the sugar, and pour over the salmon in a shallow dish. Cover and marinate for 30 minutes.

  2. Preheat a broiler. Remove the salmon from the marinade, and pat dry with paper towels. Reserve the marinade that remains in the dish. Place the fillets on a lightly oiled broiling pan or baking sheet, and place under the heat. Cook for about 6 minutes, until the edges begin to turn golden. If necessary, check the level of doneness with a thin knife. The fish should be slightly underdone to your taste, as it will return to the broiler briefly when glazed.

  3. Meanwhile, heat the marinade in a saucepan, adding the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Bring just to a boil, and remove from the heat. Brush the salmon with the glaze, and return to the broiler just until the surface begins to bubble. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Just about anywhere you go, there's a local style of chicken - and often chicken noodle - soup. It's the perfect comfort food, the sort that moms make for kids the world over. Japan is no exception, and we've dug up a recipe for Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup, which is both familiar and intriguingly unique to Western eyes. Try making it yourself, or adapt a few tricks to fit your own favorite recipe, and let a warm bowl of soup chase away the autumn chill.

Bonus Recipe, September 30th: Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup

Adapted from Japanese Home Style Cooking by Better Home Japan (Better Home Publishing House, 1986)
Serves 4

There are as many versions of chicken soup as there are cooks, and this one from Japan has its own unique twists on the familiar. In keeping with the Japanese style of artfully arranged dishes, everything is carefully composed in a bowl before adding the hot broth. Ingredients are chosen for their color and appearance as much as taste. If you are unable to find certain ingredients, then simply adapt what you have on hand, as well as what's in season.

Dashi stock is made from kombu kelp and dried bonito fish flakes; you may also find a bouillon-like version in ethnic markets. If you can't find it, a light chicken stock is the best, easiest replacement. Udon noodles are a type of thick, slightly stretchy wheat noodle. They're excellent in soup, as they have a texture and presence all their own, but any long, thick noodle will do. Kamaboko, a type of fish surimi, may be the toughest to find. Just skip it if you don't have anything similar.

Ingredients:

  • ¾ lb. dried udon noodles
  • 4 small shiitake mushrooms
  • 4 oz. chicken breast meat
  • 1 inch length carrot
  • 4 oz. spinach, chard, or other greens
  • 2 eggs
  • 2-inch piece kamaboko, cut into 4 pieces (optional)
  • 5 cups dashi stock
  • 6 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 5 tbsp. mirin
  • 1 tbsp. sake
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Prepare the dashi stock, and season with the soy sauce and 4 tbsp. mirin. Keep warm while preparing the rest of the soup.

  2. Simmer the shiitake mushrooms in water or extra dashi stock until tender. If very large, cut the caps in halves or quarters. Trim the chicken into thin bite-size pieces, and cook in a covered saucepan with the sake, until just cooked through. Add more liquid if necessary, to prevent sticking and browning.

  3. Cut the carrot into 8 thin slices. If you have a small cookie cutter, you can cut the slices into flower or leaf shapes. Boil the slices for 1 minute in salted water to soften. Boil the spinach in the same water, until it just begins to wilt. Rinse with cold water, squeeze dry, and trim into inch-long pieces.

  4. Whisk the eggs with the remaining mirin and salt. Cook in a lightly greased nonstick skillet, until the egg has set into a flat omelet. Cut into 4 pieces.

  5. Cook the udon in plenty of boiling water until soft; the noodles should be more tender than traditional Italian pasta. Drain. Place the noodles in the bottom of 4 soup bowls, and arrange the soup ingredients over the top, making sure that all of the bright colors and shapes are visible. Pour the hot broth over everything, and serve immediately.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 23rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 23rd, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Autumn is here at the Growers' Market, with the days growing cooler and shorter as we move into the last few weeks of the 2011 season. We'll be out at Ard's every Friday afternoon through the end of October, which no longer seems all that far away! The colors of summer are disappearing, as the tomatoes and peppers give their last gasps before the first frosts end it all until next year.

Though the weather and changing seasons are taking their toll on summer's vegetables, now's the time to start enjoying the reappearance of cold-weather crops. Lettuce and other salad greens are happier now than in the summer's heat, and now the broccoli plants are bursting forth with giant green heads. When the weather turns cold, they turn sweet; it's something those California-grown brassicas in the grocery store never do. Turn some of those florets into a hearty and filling Wheat Berry and Broccoli Salad, as a fine side dish for an autumn meal. Or, should the weather turn gray and chilly, as it's bound to again, cook it up with a bit of cheddar and creaminess in a Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 23rd, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Wheat Berry and Broccoli Salad

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Salads don't need to be lettuce-based; hearty grain salads, which can accommodate a wide range of ingredients, make for excellent main or side dishes. Here, it's wheat berries with broccoli and walnuts, but a range of alternatives work as well. Cauliflower's especially good here, and the addition of a little extra sweetness or savory punch, like plumped raisins, shredded cheddar cheese, or crisp, crumbled bacon, would be welcome, too.

Wheat berries can take a while to cook, but there are ways to speed up the process. Soaking the grains overnight drastically reduces the cooking time, just like when cooking up dried beans. You can also cook them in a pressure cooker, which is a fantastic time-saver if you have one.

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups cooked wheat berries
  • 3 cups broccoli, finely chopped
  • ½ cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • ½ cup parsley, chopped
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large, dry skillet over medium heat, toast the walnuts until just fragrant. Remove the nuts from the pan, wipe out any bits of walnut skin, and put the pan back on the heat. Add the olive oil to the pan, and when hot, add the onion. Cook, stirring, until softened.

  2. Add the broccoli to the pan, and stir frequently, until it begins to brown at the edges and is tender. Add the wheat berries, and stir to combine, just a minute or two, and turn out into a bowl. Stir in the parsley, and adjust the seasoning. Serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
A gratin is a wonderful thing, a simple casserole that's got a bit of creaminess, a bit of crunch, and makes for a wonderful dinner side dish. Turn some of this week's fine, fresh broccoli into a Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese, which turns the old-fashioned version of cheddar cheese melted on top of broccoli into something a little fancier - but still ooey, gooey, and wonderful.

Bonus Recipe, September 23rd: Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese

Seasonal Recipe
Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Broccoli and cheddar cheese: they're really quite good together. How many kids grew up devouring broccoli under a melted orange - sometimes just cheese-like, perhaps - topping, but unwilling to touch it in its treelike, plain green state? Try upping the ante a bit, adding a roux-thickened Bechamel sauce, enriched with cheddar cheese, and topping with fresh breadcrumbs that brown and crisp int the oven. It's soft and rich with melted cheese, topped with a great crunch for contrast. Served with something homey and reassuring, like a roast chicken, it's the perfect rustic elegance.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons of toasted fresh breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup fresh breadcrumbs (untoasted)
  • 2 lbs. broccoli, stems and florets cut into pieces
  • 1-¼ cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • A few drops white wine or lemon juice, as needed
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Blanch the broccoli in salted, boiling water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water.

  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. When it stops foaming, add the flour, stirring occasionally until the roux becomes fragrant, but not darkened, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the milk, and place the sauce over medium heat to bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook, without boiling, until it thickens up like a thick cream soup. Add in the cheese and stir. If it becomes stringy, add a little white wine or lemon juice, and remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper.

  3. Butter a 2-quart casserole or gratin dish, and sprinkle the bottom with the toasted breadcrumbs. Fold the cooked broccoli into the saucepan with the cheese sauce, and pour in the dish. Top with the remaining butter, cut into small pieces, and the untoasted breadcrumbs. Bake until the sauce is bubbly and it's beginning to brown up nicely, about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 16th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 16th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
So much rain! Although last week's flooding caused no small amount of trouble, we'll be back at Ard's this Friday for the Growers' Market! Excessive rain and floods took a toll on some of the crops and animals at our vendors' farms, and with more rain the day before market, our growers aren't able to offer much insight into what you can expect to find this week. It'll be a surprise come Friday, but seeing as this is peak season for market selection, there are bound to be some great things!

Without much advance notice to guide us, we're shooting from the hip with this week's recipes. Think warm, dry thoughts, and keep toasty indoors with Pork with Apples and Cream. Or steer more to the hot, fragrant, and restorative with a spicy (if you like) Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup. It'll take the edge off of a damp and dark day.

Looking for a great day out with the family? Bella's Gardens will be throwing their own AppleFest this Saturday, September 17th, from 10am to 5pm at the orchard. In addition to apple picking, of course, you can expect hayrides, food, music, kids' activities, and an apple dessert contest. Stop by the market stand this week, or drop by the Bella's Gardens website. You can find their orchard half a mile west of Kratzerville on Route 204.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 16th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pork with Apples and Cream

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Fruit Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)
Serves 6 to 8

This is a classic dish from Normandy, on the northern French coast, where apples and pork are plentiful. Pheasant is another traditional meat often used here, though a farm-fresh chicken is a fine alternative. This version, which makes use of slices of pork for speed and ease of cooking, is readily adaptable. You can certainly use a whole bone-in loin, or other cut of pork, by roasting the meat after browning, then making the sauce from the roasting juices. Be sure to remove any excess fat before reducing the sauce, to keep it from becoming greasy.

You can use regular butter, rather than clarified butter for this recipe, but take great care not to let it burn. Clarified butter, which has been gently melted and strained to remove the milk solids that can brown and burn, requires less careful attention, but still has great flavor. Alternately, use olive oil.

Ingredients:
  • 2 pork tenderloins, or 6-8 thick slices of pork loin
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup calvados, applejack, or other apple brandy
  • 1-½ tbsp. flour
  • 2 cups dry (hard) cider, or white wine
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 3 large apples
  • 1-½ tbsp. sugar
  • Lemon juice
  • Clarified butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the pork tenderloins (if using) thickly on the diagonal. Season with salt and pepper, and if you have time, allow to rest for several hours or overnight in the refrigerator. In a large pan with a lid, over medium heat, soften the onion in the clarified butter. Push the cooked onions to the side and brown the pork slices on both sides. Don't crowd the pieces; use two pans if necessary.

  2. Add the apple brandy to the pan, and cook for a few moments to evaporate a good bit of the alcohol. Sprinkle the flour all over, and after a moment's cooking, deglaze with the cider and stock. Lower the heat, cover the pan, and simmer until the pork is tender. Tenderloin will take only a few minutes; pork loin 10 to 15, depending on thickness. Turn the pieces occasionally to ensure even cooking. Remove the pork when cooked, and keep warm.

  3. Reduce the cooking liquid by half, or until the flavor is suitably concentrated. Exactly how much will depend on how much it has already reduced during the cooking. Stir in the cream, and season to taste with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. When ready, pour over the pork slices.

  4. While the pork cooks, peel, core, and slice the apples thinly. Fry the apple slices in butter, until lightly brown at the edges and tender, but not mushy. Sprinkle the sugar over the top, and turn the apples to allow the sugar to caramelize all over. Garnish the pork with the apples, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Cabbage is a versatile vegetable, even if not always the marquee star. It's an excellent ingredient in soups all around the world, from the hearty winter stews of northern Europe to a curry-like Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup. This one brings different flavors, from half a world away, to season up some of the basic ingredients of the winter larder. Mild or spicy, it's a richly flavored and fragrant dish to chase away the damp and cold of a rainy day.

Bonus Recipe, September 16th: Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup

Adapted from Asian Soups by Suzie Smith (Lansdowne, 2000)
Serves 4

Cabbage may not be the sexiest of vegetables, but it's inexpensive, long-lasting, nutritious, and quite versatile. Think of it as a vegetable that likes to play well with others. Where a European tradition might take beef and cabbage, and enrich them with butter and cream, and season with spices like caraway seed, this alternate take uses the flavors of Thai curries to chase off a wintry chill.

The basic recipe here is quite mild, but can easily be adjusted to accommodate your preference for heat and spice.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. chuck steak, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 cups shredded white or Chinese cabbage
  • 3 or 4 small red chilli peppers
  • 4 shallots, peeled
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp. fresh ginger, chopped
  • ½ cup fresh cilantro
  • 2 tbsp. lime zest
  • 1 tsp. coriander
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • ½ tsp. black pepper
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • ¼ cup peanut oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 6 cups beef stock
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Combine the chilli peppers, shallots, garlic, ginger, cilantro, lime zest, coriander, cumin, black pepper, and turmeric in a food processor, and process to a smooth paste.

  2. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat, and add the peanut oil. When it shimmers, add the spice paste, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Add the onion and beef to the pot, with extra oil if necessary, and cook until the onion is softened and the beef is browned all over. Add the stock, coconut milk, tomatoes, and fish sauce, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, and cook until the beef is tender, about an hour and a half.

  3. Stir in the cabbage and continue to cook until the cabbage is tender, about 10 minutes. Check the seasoning, and serve immediately.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

SVGM - September 9th - CANCELLED

Due to our concerns over flooding, accessibility, and general safety for all involved, the Growers' Market has been cancelled for Friday, September 9th. If there are any further updates, we will post them on our Facebook page. We hope to be back next Friday, as usual.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 2nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 2nd, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
September's here, and it looks like a pleasant afternoon for this week's Growers' Market! It's Labor Day weekend, and you can expect plenty of fine local meats and produce to pick up for that Monday cookout: grass-fed beef for hamburgers; sweet Italian sausages from delicious local pork; fingerling potatoes just perfect for potato salad; juicy, ripe tomatoes; sweet corn; sweet watermelon and cantaloupe; and more!

Hamburgers on the grill may be the beef-based standard for summer and fall holidays, but there are plenty of other fine cuts to enjoy from the cow. We have two different recipes this week, using two different cuts. One is quick and easy; the other takes time, but most of it unattended. Both are delicious, and worth considering if the weather postpones the picnic. Short Ribs with Potatoes and Mustard is a simple braise, and one best made a day ahead and reheated; Sichuan Beef with Peppers is a lightning-fast Chinese stir-fry.

This coming week, Bucknell University's Environmental Center is kicking off a film series at Lewisburg's renovated Campus Theatre with "Fresh," an independent documentary film about America's ailing food system and the innovative community farmers who are providing healthier alternatives. After the film, there will be a panel discussion on sustainable agriculture with the film's director.

"Fresh" screens Tuesday, September 6th at 7pm at the Campus Theatre (413 Market St., Lewisburg). It's open to the general public, and admission is just $2. You can find more information on the theatre's website, http://www.campustheatre.org/, or by contacting Wendy Chou (wc013@bucknell.edu).

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 2nd, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Short Ribs with Potatoes and Mustard

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 4

Short ribs can be tough, but, like most tough muscles, have a great deal of flavor. Braising is a great way to tackle this problem, as the long, moist cooking reduces the connective tissue to perfect tenderness, while turning the cooking liquid into an intensely flavored sauce. These sorts of recipes are best made ahead, as the flavors really meld as they sit in the refrigerator overnight, and you then have the opportunity to skim off any excess fat that hardens on top. Just take care not to boil the dish when reheating, which will keep the beef moist, tender, and delicious.

Ingredients:
  • 3 lb. beef short ribs
  • 2 cups onions, diced
  • 1-½ lb. fingerling or other waxy potatoes, cut in half if large
  • 1-½ cup beef stock (or water), plus more as needed
  • 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp. neutral cooking oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a Dutch oven, or another large, heavy pot with a lid, heat the oil over medium-high heat. In batches, brown the short ribs well on all sides, taking care not to burn them. Set the ribs aside as you finish, and pour off any excess fat. Keep enough to cook the onions.

  2. Reduce the heat to medium, and cook the onions, stirring, until soft and beginning to brown. Add the stock, and return the ribs to the pot. Bring up to a boil, then cover and put on low heat. Stir from time to time, and add extra liquid if it begins to fry out.

  3. After 30 minutes, add the potatoes to the mix. Check and turn the meat about every 15 minutes or so; it will take at least another 30 minutes before the meat is tender. If the potatoes finish early, remove them with a slotted spoon. When everything is cooked, remove the meat and potatoes from the stew, and skim the fat from the braising liquid. (This is easiest if you can let it chill in the refrigerator overnight.) Reheat everything together gently, stirring the mustard into the liquid just before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Stir-fries are quick, simple dishes, and ideal for an easy weekday night meal. Most, like in this recipe for Sichuan Beef with Peppers, use a few simple but flavorful (and colorful!) ingredients to make a meal on short notice.

Bonus Recipe, September 2nd: Sichuan Beef with Peppers

Seasonal Recipe
Sichuan Beef with Peppers

Adapted from Land of Plenty by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2001)
Serves 2

Served with plain white rice, this can be a simple dinner for two that takes less time to prepare than the rice. You can also serve it as one dish among several, for a bigger crowd or for a fancier meal. If you decide to scale up the portions, though, take care not to crowd the pan, which can keep the stir-fry from cooking properly - everything steams instead of browning.

Ingredients:

  • ½ lb. lean beef, such as flank steak
  • ½ red bell pepper
  • ½ green bell pepper
  • 2 tsp. Shaoxing wine, or sherry
  • 1 tbsp. plus ¾ tsp. cornstarch
  • 2 tsp. water
  • ½ tbsp. soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp. chicken stock
  • Peanut oil, for cooking
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the beef against the grain into thin strips, and place in a bowl with the Shaoxing wine, 1 tbsp. cornstarch, the water, and salt. Meanwhile, slice the bell peppers into thin strips like the beef. In a small bowl, combine the stock, the remaining constarch, and the soy sauce.

  2. Heat a wok, or a large skillet, over medium-high heat. Add about a tablespoon of oil, and stir-fry the peppers for a minute or two, until they are just cooked. Remove them from the wok, and add the beef, with more peanut oil if necessary. Stir constantly to keep the pieces separate. When the pieces are starting to brown well, add the peppers back, and stir for a moment before adding the soy-stock mix. Stir until the mixture thickens - just a few seconds! - and remove to a serving dish. Serve immediately.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 26th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 26th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's the end of August at the Growers' Market, and though we've been seeing more and more of fall's vegetables appearing - the cabbages, potatoes, carrots, and onions that linger through the winter, for the rich and hearty stews, braises, and other dishes that ward off the January chill - there's plenty of summer produce to last for weeks before frost. Melons, tomatoes, peppers, corn and more, it's that season of overlap, where we get a little of everything, all together. Enjoy it while it's here!

It's here and it's fresh, so now's the time to set aside some of the summer's bounty for preserving. Canning tomatoes and freezing corn are fine options, and another real treat - something special in midwinter - is a fragrant, delicious Basil Pesto. Make a big batch, take enough to enjoy now, and freeze the rest for the future, when basil's no longer fresh and plentiful. You can even spread it on a few savory Jalapeno & Cheddar Muffins, in lieu of butter or jam. They're fine for breakfast, but also work well as side dish for a dinner made with fresh tomatoes, sweet corn, and the other flavors of summer. Try them along with grilled or roast pork, or chop and toast them - any leftovers, that is - and use them as a flavorful stuffing for roast chicken.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 26th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Jalapeno & Cheddar Muffins

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Makes 10-12 muffins

Muffins are quick and easy, and can be sweet, savory, or even a little of both, to suit your taste and the rest of the meal you'll enjoy them with. This recipe leans savory, but you can certainly increase the sweetness with the addition of a bit of extra honey, or by replacing the hot peppers with sweet bells, instead. There's also room enough for a cup's worth of corn kernels, if you're so inclined.

Ingredients:
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • 2-½ tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 1-½ tbsp. honey
  • 1 to 2 cups grated cheddar cheese
  • ½ cup jalapeno peppers, finely diced
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease a set of muffin tins. Combine the dry ingredients - flours, cornmeal, baking powder, salt - in a large bowl. In another bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, eggs, honey and butter. Pour the wet over the dry, stirring until just combined. Fold in about three-quarters of the cheddar and the jalapeno peppers. Spoon into muffin tins, about three-quarters full, and sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top.

  2. Bake until the muffins are brown and a toothpick in the center comes out clean. Serve while still warm, or split and toast to reheat.
* * * * *

On The Website
Basil Pesto is a simple, but intensely flavorful dressing for pasta, a sandwich spread, a quick way to add something special to a simple soup. Make it now, when you can get loads of basil fresh and sweet, and freeze the rest for future meals.

Bonus Recipe, August 26th: Basil Pesto


Seasonal Recipe
Basil Pesto

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Makes about 1 cup

Traditional pesto is a simple sauce, a combination of basil, garlic, pine nuts, and olive oil. Parmesan cheese, while delicious, is optional, and really, it's all flexible and adjustable to taste. Try it with roasted garlic for sweetness, or grilled garlic for a subtle smokiness. Replace all or part of the basil with other herbs - such as cilantro, parsley, or mint - for a different flavor.

You can also swap out the expensive pine nuts for another. Walnuts have a more assertive flavor, but are a fine choice; just be aware that walnut-based pesto turns darker, and faster, than one made with pine nuts. Really, it's just the way of pesto, as the chemical compounds that make basil taste like, well, basil, are the same ones that cause it to lose its bright green color when tossed with pasta. More browning occurs when you include the stems and leaf bases in the pesto, so you can reduce that by pinching them off as you go. (Stems are the easy ones; leaf bases are hardly worth the effort.)

When you have the chance, make extra pesto. It freezes especially well. Separate it into small portions that you'll use quickly, and they'll thaw in no time, ready for pasta, sandwiches, salad dressings, you name it. Muffin tins - regular or mini size - lined with plastic wrap are great for portioning.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups basil leaves, loosely packed
  • 1 or 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tbsp. pine nuts or walnuts
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients, except forthe cheese and about half of the olive oil, in a food processor. Process, scraping down the sides from time to time, and add the remaining oil gradually. If you like it thinner, add extra oil to achieve that consistency. Stir in the Parmesan just before serving, if using.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 19th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 19th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
For those who have missed them during the long Alaskan fishing season, you can look forward to Wild For Salmon's return at this week's Growers' Market! Following a successful summer in Bristol Bay, they're back in Pennsylvania with the catch. You can read up on their 2011 exploits in their newsletter, or stop by to chat in person. This year, they'll have the usual fillets and portions, hot- and cold-smoked salmon, as flavored burgers, sausages, and spreads.

Do you have friends, neighbors, or family members over 60 who might benefit from the PA Farmer's Market Voucher Program? Low-income residents of Union and Snyder county have the opportunity to receive free vouchers to purchase fresh, Pennsylvania-grown fruits and vegetables from local farmers' markets, including from the SVGM. The final opportunity for this year will be at the Lewisburg Senior Center, 116 N. 2nd St, on Friday, August 19th, from 8:30 to 12:00. If you think you, or someone you know, might be eligible, please check out this flyer for more details.

It's hard not to get salmon on the brain, so we've picked out a pair of recipes to pair the freshly-caught fish with some of the fresh produce at this week's market. Try adding a little color and spice with a Hawaiian-inspired Poached Salmon with Fruit Salsa, combining fresh peaches, tomatoes, onions and peppers for a sweet-spicy dish that's excellent served hot or cold. Or pull out the grill (or fire up the broiler when the skies threaten) for Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes, and enjoy the late summer weather.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 19th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Poached Salmon with Fruit Salsa

Adapted from Sam Choy's Island Flavors by Sam Choy (Hyperion, 1999)
Serves 4

Poaching salmon, by cooking it gently in simmering liquid, allows a bit of flexibility in serving. Unlike cooking fish on the grill, under the broiler, or in a skillet, poached salmon is actually quite tasty when served cold. You can certainly prepare the salmon by other methods, as well, as suits your taste.

The salsa here calls for peaches, and tomatoes, since they're fresh and in season. That said, any combination of sweet and sour, with enough spiciness to add liveliness, would be perfect here. Adjust the ingredients based on what you have, and make more than you need; extra salsa's good with pork, chicken, or simply with plain old tortilla chips.

Ingredients:
  • 4 salmon fillet portions
  • 1 cup diced peaches
  • 1 cup diced tomatoes
  • ½ cup diced red onion
  • ½ cup diced bell peppers, hot peppers, or a mixture
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • Fresh lime juice, to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place the salmon, skin side down, in a pan large enough to accommodate it without overlapping. cover with cold, well-salted water. (You can also use stock, wine, or any flavorful liquid you like.) Cover the pan tightly. Bring to a boil, and immediately shut off the heat. Allow the salmon to rest in the hot water until cooked through, about 10 minutes. Check for doneness with a thin-bladed knife, taking care to avoid overcooking. Remove from the water, drain, and, if serving cold, chill until needed.

  2. Toss together the peaches, tomatoes, peppers, onion, and cilantro. Adjust to taste with fresh lime juice, salt and pepper. Spoon over the salmon fillets before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Salmon can stand up to the grill, which is a challenge that few fish are up to. Use that heat to flavor up the salmon and some sweet, fresh produce in a recipe for Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes. Try it with some freshly dug potatoes and plenty of garlic for a real taste of summer!

Bonus Recipe, August 19th: Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Salmon with Cherry Tomatoes

Serves 4

Salmon's wonderful on the grill, and if you want to get the most out of this recipe, you'll want to work with very hot coals, keeping a close eye on it all the whole time. Don't be afraid to scorch the skin on the tomatoes, potatoes, or garlic; after peeling away any burnt bits, you'll be left with a wonderful smokiness that permeates the entire dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ lbs. salmon fillets
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes
  • 1-½ lbs. small, waxy potatoes
  • 1 head garlic
  • 1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup plus 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, thinly sliced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Before heating the grill, prepare the potatoes. Boil or steam the spuds whole, until tender when pierced with a knife, 20 to 40 minutes, depending on size. Refrigerate until needed.

  2. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill (or a broiler, if necessary). Meanwhile, prepare the salmon and vegetables. Spear the tomatoes on kebab skewers; do the same for the cloves of garlic, leaving the paper husk on. This will prevent the garlic from burning over the heat. Cut the salmon into approximately 1-½- to 2-inch pieces, place on skewers, drizzle with the 2 tbsp. olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. If the cooked potatoes are too small for the grill grate, skewer them as well.

  3. Cook the garlic first, close to the hot coals or flame, turning regularly. The outer husk will char, but the garlic will be cooked to a soft, smoky sweetness when you can feel the cloves softened inside. (Squeeze gently.) Cook the tomatoes until soft, their skins splitting, and the potatoes until the skins are nicely browned and the flesh heated. Cook the salmon until done, about 8 to 10 minutes, depending on the heat and size of the pieces. As they come off the grill, toss the potatoes, tomatoes, and salmon into a bowl, letting them rest a few minutes while you prepare the dressing.

  4. Squeeze the cooked garlic from the cloves, and mash in a mortar or with the back of a fork. Combine with the remaining olive oil, mustard, lemon juice, and seasoning to taste. Pour over the other ingredients, tossing to combine, and add the basil at the last minute. Serve immediately.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 12th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 12th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Garlic season is upon us at the Growers' Market! There are plenty of varieties to choose from, each with differences in size, in flavor, in the white-and-purple patterning on their skin. Some are best when raw; others when sauteed; and others turn exceptionally sweet when roasted. So sweet, in fact, that you can even pick up a fine, jelly-style Garlic Glaze from White Frost Farm. It's ideal for dressing roast or grilled pork, a sweet-savory addition that's perfect with leaner cuts like pork tenderloin.

It's all garlic recipes this week: Chicken and 40 Cloves is the classic all-garlic-all-the-time dish, and one of the very few recipes where you can never have too much garlic. The "40 cloves" may seem a bit excessive, but once you have all that slow-cooked garlic and flavorful, garlic-infused olive oil, don't be surprised if you wish you'd doubled it. For a somewhat less insistent, but still richly-flavored dish, consider Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic. Right now, the potatoes are freshly dug, and the garlic cured and full of flavor, but it continues to be a fine, seasonal recipe for months with these long-keeping vegetables.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 12th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

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Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and 40 Cloves

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Forty cloves of garlic seems like an awful lot, but really, it isn't. At least, not when left whole and gently roasted in olive oil, which turns its pungent spiciness into a deep, rich sweetness, and its crisp texture to meltingly soft. Once cooked this way, any extra garlic can be used to season other recipes, too. It's great in a fresh tomato sauce for pasta, spread for a sandwich, or in the recipe for Potato and Roasted Garlic Soup, on our website.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole chicken, about 4 lbs., cut into pieces
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • ¼ cup olive oil, plus more for browning the chicken
  • 3 large heads garlic, or as much as you like
  • 1 tbsp. chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, or savory
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rub the chicken pieces with the herbs, salt and pepper. Rest for at least an hour or two in the refrigerator, if you have the time. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Separate the garlic cloves, but don't peel; the finished garlic will easily squeeze out from its papery skin.

  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the chicken pieces on all sides, doing so in batches to avoid crowding. Arrange the pieces, along with any juices, in an large ovenproof casserole with a lid. (If you don't have a lid, cover very tightly with foil.) Add the garlic cloves, stock, wine, and olive oil. Cover, and cook in the oven until the chicken is fully cooked through, about an hour or more.

  3. Serve the chicken immediately, or keep warm while turning the pan juices into a gravy. (A few mashed cloves of garlic make an excellent thickener.) Serve with plenty of fresh bread, to enjoy the roasted garlic.
* * * * *

On The Website
Simple, but always delicious, a pot of Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic can be an easy soup to start a meal, or the very centerpiece. Leave it simple, or garnish with chopped fresh tomatoes or cooked fresh greens, with fresh bread to clean up the bottom of the bowl.

And, of course, where would we be without Roasted Garlic? It's so simple, but so sweet, rich, and useful, that not having a recipe would be a real shame.

Bonus Recipe, August 12th: Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic

Seasonal Recipe
Potato Soup with Roasted Garlic

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Potato soup could hardly be easier. Use whatever sort of potatoes you like, as long as they're fresh and flavorful. Starchy baking potatoes tend to fall apart, lending a creamy body to the soup, while fingerlings and other waxy varieties hold their shape. You can mix and match, too, to enrich the body while still having substantial pieces in the finished soup.

Peeling is optional, too, depending on your preference, and you can always remove them at the end by passing everything through a food mill. (This works well if you don't feel like peeling your garlic, either.)

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp. butter or olive oil
  • 2 onions, finely diced
  • 2 or 3 bay leaves
  • 2 lb. potatoes, peeled (optional) and chopped
  • 2 heads roasted garlic
  • 2 quarts plus 1 cup water or stock
  • 2 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a heavy pot over medium heat, melt the butter. When the foam subsides, add the onions and bay leaves, stirring occasionally until they soften. Add the potatoes and raise the heat. Cook about 10 minutes, stirring frequently, and add 1 cup water. Scrape the bottom to loosen up any flavorful brown bits.

  2. Add the remaining water and the garlic, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partly covered, until the potatoes are soft, about 20 to 30 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and check the seasoning. If you like, pass the soup through a food mill, and serve immediately, garnished with the fresh parsley.

Bonus Recipe, August 12th: Roasted Garlic

Seasonal Recipe
Roasted Garlic


Roasting garlic turns its sulfurous pungency into a deep sweetness, and changes the texture into something not unlike softened butter. The more the cells of the garlic cloves are damaged, and the less it's cooked, the hotter the flavor, which is why just one or two cloves can give a batch of basil pesto such a bracing garlic flavor. Here, the cloves are left intact, and cooked slowly, for a long time, bringing out a natural sweetness that's even made its way into cookie recipes!

Ingredients:

  • Garlic cloves
  • Olive oil
  • Salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Separate the cloves from the head, removing the loose outer layers of papery skin. Peeling now is optional; when finished, simply squeezing the cooked cloves is enough to pop out the buttery garlic. Arrange the cloves in a ramekin or other ovenproof dish just big enough to hold them. More than one layer is okay. Add a pinch of salt, and pour over olive oil to cover. Wrap the top tightly with foil, and bake for at least an hour, until the garlic is tender but not starting to fry crisp. (Squeeze a clove with tongs to check.)

  2. Allow the garlic to cool, and remove the cloves from the oil. Strain, if necessary, and reserve for future recipes; garlic oil's full of flavor. It's excellent for sauteing vegetables, for richly flavored vinaigrettes, or for a last-minute drizzle for soups, roasts, grileld vegetables, what have you. The garlic cloves can be refrigerated until needed for recipes, or for making some really excellent garlic bread.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

News from the SVGM - August 5th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 5th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is here at the Growers' Market! In addition to all of the fresh vegetables that have been appearing at the market for the past several weeks, you can now find fresh edamame. Tender, young soybeans, they're excellent lightly boiled and salted. The cooked beans pop out of their pods easily, so much so that even picky kids can get a kick out of eating "squeezy beans."

Don't overlook the fresh fruit at the market! Ripe peaches and plums are wonderful eaten out of hand - though perhaps with a napkin to catch the drips. They also make for fine summer desserts, like a Peach Cobbler or a Plum Crisp. Or perhaps plum cobbler and peach crisp. Or, while they're fresh, try substituting sour plums, which are to a sweet plum as a sour cherry is to a sweet cherry. You'll need to adjust the sweetness to offset the tartness of the fruit, but their more complex flavor is well worth the experience of trying something new.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 5th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Peach Cobbler

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6

Cobblers are one of the classic, beloved American desserts, and one better suited to soft, juicy fruits than a pie. With a sweet biscuit topping, there's no soggy bottom crust; there's no need to thicken the fruit filling excessively, either, which means a more flavorful dessert all around. Serve room temperature or still warm from the oven, with or without ice cream.

Skinning the peaches is preferable, but optional if you're not so inclined. If you don't want to bother peeling - by scoring the skin and blanching briefly in boiling water - just be sure to slice the peaches thinly enough that the skins remain unnoticeable. Other fine fruits for cobblers, in season, include plums, blueberries, apricots, cherries, apples, pears, or any combination that sounds good.


Ingredients:
  • 1-¾ cups all-purpose or whole-wheat flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • ½ cup honey
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 6 tbsp. cold butter, cut into pieces
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ tsp. vanilla
  • 6 - 8 cups ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • Zest and juice of a lemon
  • 1 egg, beaten, or 1 tbsp. milk (optional)
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. While the oven heats, combine the peaches, ¼ cup flour, honey, cinnamon, lemon juice and zest in a bowl, stirring to combine. Set aside while you prepare the cobbler topping.

  2. Mix together the remaining flour, sugar, baking powder and soda, and salt. Cut in the butter until it resembles coarse crumbs, and mix in the buttermilk and vanilla, gently, just until it all presses together easily. Take care not to overwork the dough.

  3. Pour the peach mixture into an 8x8 pan or other baking dish. Using your hands or a spoon, drop the cobbler topping over the surface covering most (but not all) of the fruit. Alternately, you can roll out the dough and cut it into shapes, like biscuits. Brush the top with beaten egg or milk, and slide into the oven over a baking sheet to catch any drips. Bake for 25 - 30 minutes, until the fruit is cooked and bubbling, and the topping is nicely browned. Set aside to cool for a few minutes, and serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Even easier than a cobbler: a Plum Crisp. Crisps are just as flexible in their fillings, but have the added bonus of being able to prepare - and freeze - the topping well in advance, for a quick and easy summer dessert that you can put together in the time it takes to preheat the oven.

Bonus Recipe, August 5th: Plum Crisp

Seasonal Recipe
Plum Crisp

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6

Crisps are dead-easy summer desserts, simply sweetened slices of fruit topped with a mix of butter, sugar, flour and oats that turns into crunchy topping after baking. Most any fruit works, though a crisp is an ideal use for softer fruits, like peaches and plums, that often refuse to hold together well enough for a slice of pie.

The topping here freezes beautifully, so it's worth the effort to make a double (or triple) batch while you're at it. Simply pull the frozen topping from the freezer, and crumble over the fruit. There's no need to thaw before popping it in the oven, so you can throw together dessert in less time than it takes the oven to preheat.

Ingredients:

  • 6 tbsp. butter, in chunks
  • ¾ cup brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup flour
  • ½ cup rolled oats
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 3 lb. plums, pitted and quartered
  • ¼ cup honey
  • Zest of an orange
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Toss together the plums, honey, and orange zest in a bowl, and rest while you prepare the topping.

  2. Using your fingertips, or a stand mixer with paddle attachment, mix together the butter, brown sugar, flour, oats, salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon, until it's a coarse, crumbly mixture. Pour the plums into an 8x8 baking dish, and scatter the crisp topping over. Place on a baking sheet to catch any drips. Bake until the fruit bubbles and the topping is brown and crisp, about 1 hour. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

News from the SVGM - July 29th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 29th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Summer sure has arrived, and the Growers' Market will be out in it this Friday, rain or shine, heat or... well, it'll still be hot at the end of July. That's probably not going to change, although at least it won't be as toasty as last weekend. It's the peak of summer, and time for all the usual suspects, the tomatoes, zucchini, sweet corn, red beets, fragrant basil, and more. And, of course, fresh meats and cheeses, sweet local honey - try the delicate spring honey, if you haven't yet - freshly baked breads and sweets, and more.

Not sure what to do with sweet summer corn? Probably not, but if you've ever had eyes bigger than your stomach, and worried you won't eat it all before the sweetness fades, you might wish for a better way to keep it. If so, try preserving that summery flavor with a Pickled Corn Pepper Relish. Those with a home-canning setup can set relish aside for the cold months of winter, but it's also fine to make it for the immediate future, and just keep it in the fridge. If you've got the same problem with fresh bread, with too much to enjoy before it starts to stale, you still have options. There's french toast, of course, or a more dessert-appropriate Honey-Raisin Bread Pudding.

We've got live music from A.J. Bashore again this week! He'll be by to perform some fine traditional Appalachian music, making a joyful noise!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 29th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Honey-Raisin Bread Pudding

Adapted from Chicken for Dinner by Heidi Haughy Cusick (Oxmoor House, 1998)
Serves 4-6

Bread pudding is such a simple dessert, a way to use old bread that's beginning to turn stale. Any bread that would match with sweetness would work here, from brioche to cranberry-walnut to a plain ciabatta. (Kalamata olive might not be the ideal choice.) Serve this as dessert, with whipped cream, or as a part of a large brunch.

Raisins may be the year-round reliable addition, although any dried fruit works as well. When in season and available, however, fresh fruits, from blueberries and raspberries to peaches and apples.


Ingredients:
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ¼ cup rum or brandy
  • 4 cups day-old bread cubes
  • ½ cup honey
  • 1/3 cup butter, melted
  • 3 eggs
  • 1-½ cups milk
  • ½ tbsp. vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • 2 medium peaches, stones removed, diced
Directions:
  1. In a small bowl, combine the raisins and rum. Allow to soak for half an hour. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter an 8-inch square baking dish or 4 to 6 ramekins, depending on size.

  2. Spread the bread cubes on a baking sheet, and bake until lightly toasted, about 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. While the bread is toasting, combine the honey, butter, eggs, milk, cinnamon, and vanilla in a large bowl. Add the cooled bread, raisins, rum, and peaches. Give the bread a few minutes and an occasional stir to soak up the liquid, and spread into your baking dish or ramekins.

  3. Bake until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Ramekins should be done in about 30-35 minutes; a large dish may take 50-60 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Everything's at the market these days for bright summer salsas, made with ripe tomatoes, peppers, onions, and fresh herbs. Don't overlook the opportunities for sweet-spicy relishes, too, to enjoy with fried chicken, grilled pork chops, or just to top a couple of hot dogs. We've got one for Pickled Corn Pepper Relish, a bright, tangy, and - if you like - spicy condiment that's a fine taste of summer.

Bonus Recipe, July 29th: Pickled Corn Pepper Relish

Seasonal Recipe
Pickled Corn Pepper Relish

Adapted from Seasons of Central Pennsylvania by Anne Quinn Corr (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000)
Makes about 9 pints

Summer is the season for sweet vegetables, but sometimes there's just too much to eat all at once, when it's all still perfect and fresh. If that's the case, try pickling and preserving, making it last until sometime later, when the summer bounty isn't so bountiful, when the weather isn't so summery.

If you don't have a canner at home, you can still make this recipe. Store the relish in the refrigerator, where it will keep well for a while. Storing your relish in the refrigerator also permits you to make more adjustments to the recipe, to make it more to your taste. While it's always advisable to follow canning recipes closely, to avoid any possibility of food poisoning, when not canning, like in cooking, your options are more open.

That said, feel free to play with quantities of herbs and spices to your heart's content. In such small quantities, modifications won't affect the safety of the final relish.

Ingredients:

  • Ears of corn, enough for10 cups fresh corn kernels (16 to 20 ears)
  • 2-½ cups bell peppers, diced
  • 2-½ cups wax or other hot peppers, diced
  • 2-½ cups celery, diced
  • 1-¼ cups onion, diced
  • 1 tbsp. garlic, finely chopped
  • 1-¾ cups sugar
  • 5 cups cider vinegar (5% acidity)
  • 2-½ tsp. canning/pickling salt
  • 1-½ tsp. celery seeds
  • 2-½ tbsp. dry mustard
  • 1-¼ tsp. turmeric
Directions:
  1. Husk and boil the ears of corn until just tender, about 3 minutes. Chill in ice water, and trim from the ears.

  2. In a large pot, combine the peppers, celery, onion, sugar, vinegar, salt, and celery seed. Bring to a boil, and simmer 5 minutes, stirring to ensure the salt and sugar dissolve. Ladle out a small portion, and mix in the mustard and turmeric, stirring well to prevent lumps. Return to the pot, along with the corn kernels. Simmer 5 minutes.

  3. Fill hot, sterilized pint canning jars with the hot mixture, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and rings, and process in a boiling water canner for 16 minutes. Allow to cool completely, preferably overnight, before removing rings. Store any unsealed or partially filled jars in the refrigerator.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

News from the SVGM - July 22nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 22nd, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Summer's vegetable bounty is under way at the Growers' Market this Friday! Tomatoes, hot peppers, zucchini, green beans, and sweet corn will be there, along with plenty of others that adore this fierce summer heat more than we do. We're also well into potato season, garlic season, and fresh onion season, when the sweet bulbs have had plenty of time to plump up. Some are spicy, and ideal for a fresh summer salsa; others are sweet, and perfect for raw slices on a juicy hamburger.

Get 'em while they're here! Squash blossoms are a summer delicacy, plucked from the flowering plants in the early morning, best cooked up that day. Stuffed with a little bit of fresh, herb-flavored goat cheese, they're a fantastic fried treat. Try some Squash Blossoms with Goat Cheese as a summery appetizer - the sort you can't help but eat bite by bite, as they're sizzling hot, crispy outside, and ooey and gooey inside. Or if you're one to load up on fresh sweet corn, Sweet Corn Risotto, a creamed-corn-like side dish that gets its delicious, creamy texture from the juice of the corn itself.

Woody Wolfe will be at the market this week! He'll have his guitar, his good spirits, and an enthusiasm for requests. Ask for a tune while you do your shopping!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 22nd, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Squash Blossoms with Goat Cheese

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Squash blossoms are a delicate summer treat, one that must be picked in the early morning before they open up and begin to fade. They only need minimal cooking, but serve as a fine vessel for a bit of fresh goat cheese, with a thin coating of deep-fried batter for crunch. You can, of course, use any coating that you like for frying these, from one as simple as a dredge in seasoned flour to a light, puffed-out tempura batter.

Ingredients:
  • 16 squash blossoms
  • 2/3 cup fresh goat cheese
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup beer or seltzer
  • Neutral oil, such as corn, for frying
Directions:
  1. In a deep pan over medium-high heat, add 2 inches of oil for frying. Heat to 350°F.

  2. Combine 1 cup flour with the baking powder, salt, egg, and beer. It should be about as thick as pancake batter. Reserve the additional cup of flour for dredging. Carefully fill each squash blossom with about 2 teaspoons of goat cheese - a piping bag makes this easier - and gently twist the petals to seal shut. Dredge each in the flour, then in the batter.

  3. Add the blossoms directly from the batter to the hot oil; a bit of batter on the fingers helps protect from any splashes of hot oil. Fry in batches to avoid crowding, turning once. They're done as soon as the crust is golden brown. Drain on paper towels, and eat immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Fresh sweet corn is now at the market, and should be around - weather permitting - until the fall frosts put an end to the season. Enjoy it boiled, steamed, grilled, or stock up and trim a few ears for a Sweet Corn Risotto. The starchy sweetness of fresh corn, when cooked up thickens into a risotto-like dish that's seasoned with fresh onions, hot peppers, and the bright flavors of fresh herbs.

Bonus Recipe, July 22nd: Sweet Corn Risotto

Seasonal Recipe
Sweet Corn Risotto

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma: Risotto by Kristine Kidd (Time-Life, 1998)
Serves 6

Risotto implies rice, and this recipe has none - but it does achieve the same creaminess and texture. The sweet starchiness of freshly picked corn adds thickness and body, with a bit of onion, pepper, and paprika to bring round out the flavor. While sweet corn is always best shortly after picking, this is one recipe that's still good with corn that's been in the refrigerator, forgotten for a few days. If you find your corn is leaning starchy, rather than sweet, simply add a pinch of two of sugar and a little extra lemon juice to brighten up the dish.

Ingredients:

  • 18 ears fresh sweet corn, husked, silks removed
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 cups vegetable stock, chicken stock, or water
  • 6 jalapeno or 2 hungarian wax peppers, seeded and diced
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Juice of a lemon, or to taste
  • Fresh basil, to garnish
Directions:
  1. Trim the kernels from 6 ears of corn, and, with the back of a heavy knife, scrape along the cobs to extract all of the juice. Grate the remaining ears on the coarse side of a box grater, collecting the shredded corn in a bowl with the cut kernels. Add the smoked paprika, and stir to combine.

  2. In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Cook the onion and diced pepper until the onion turns translucent, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat slightly and add the corn and stock, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender and the mixture thickens, about 10 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice, and taste for seasoning. Garnish with the basil, and serve immediately.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

News from the SVGM - July 15th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 15th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The sun is out, once more, and this Friday you can expect to see just about everyone back at the Growers' Market! After a rainy Friday last week, with a few of our vendors unable to attend, we're back to full strength this week. White Frost Farm and Dreisbach Greenhouses are back from their time off, with fresh vegetables and other treats; Bella's Gardens is hoping to arrive with fresh peaches and plums; and Cow-A-Hen Farm will be bringing plenty of freshly cut pork.

In addition to that, expect to find Bill Vint with lots of gorgeous, sweet, and large blueberries; Gemelli Bakery with fresh breads; cheeses from Stone Meadow and Broadway Acres; a fine selection of fresh vegetables, including green beans, zucchini, and new potatoes, from Green Meadow Farm; local honey from Dawg Gone Bees; flower bouquets and handmade truffles from Fleur et Chocolat; and fresh chickens and pork from Beaver Run Farms.

With freshly dug potatoes at the market, you might consider serving them with a roast pork loin, like in this recipe for Roast Pork with Herbs and Potatoes. The sweet, tender flavor of early potatoes is wonderful this time of year, though this is the sort of recipe that'll be welcome any time of year. Try serving the pork with some fresh green beans (or wax beans, or purple beans, depending on your color preference) dressed with creamy homemade mayonnaise and fresh garlic, as in Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise. The mayonnaise is rich and tangy, and goes well with the less pungent flavor of freshly dug garlic.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 15th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Roast Pork with Herbs and Potatoes

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 6 or more

The best cut of pork for oven roasting might be the loin, which is a good combination of tender and flavorful, although you can use anything that you like. A tenderloin will cook more quickly, and so requires more vigilance to avoid drying out the lean meat. Shoulders and butts, while much more forgiving, tend to leave a fair bit of fat in the pan, and so should be roasted in a separate pan from any potatoes or other vegetables. (In this case, consider buttered, boiled new potatoes to accompany a shoulder roast.) Regardless of the cut, you can use bone-in or boneless, as you prefer. The latter is easier to carve, but the former tends to remain juicier after cooking.

Ingredients:
  • One 2-3 lb. boneless pork loin roast (or 3-4 lb. bone-in)
  • 2 lb. potatoes, cut into 1-½ inch chunks, smaller ones left whole
  • 3 tbsp. fresh garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp. fresh herbs, such as sage, rosemary, or parsley, minced
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Mix together the garlic, herbs, salt and pepper. Combine about ½ tbsp. of the garlic mixture with the olive oil, and toss with the potatoes to coat. Place the potatoes in a roasting pan, and slide in the oven while preparing the pork.

  2. Use a thin knife to pierce the pork all over, rubbing the garlic mixture into the slits, and over the roast. Nestle the pork among the potatoes in the roasting pan, and drizzle a bit more olive oil over the top. Roast for 30 minutes, then stir the potatoes - scraping up any that stick - and baste the meat with any juices. Reduce the oven's heat to 325°F, and continue cooking until the pork is done, another 45 minutes, checking and stirring the potatoes every 15 minutes or so. Remember that the pork's temperature will rise another 10°F or so while resting, so you may wish to pull it before it's 100% done.

  3. Check the potatoes when the pork comes out of the oven. If they could use a little more cooking, either for tenderness or extra browning, place them under the broiler as necessary; if they're perfect, turn off the oven and let them keep warm inside while the pork rests for 10 to 15 minutes. Carve the meat, and serve immediately with the potatoes.
* * * * *

On The Website
Green beans are delicious when simply prepared, be it blanched, steamed, or stir-fried. A half-step more complicated is to dress them with a simple sauce, as in Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise. There's nothing better than a sauce that comes together in the time it takes to the green beans to boil, and this combination of mayonnaise, fresh garlic, herbs and lemon juice really can take less than a minute. Depending on your garlic-chopping skills, of course.

You can also check the website for a recipe for homemade mayo, made with oil and fresh eggs. It's rich and flavorful, and well worth the effort if you've got a little extra time.

Bonus Recipe, July 15th: Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise

Seasonal Recipe
Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 - 6

Fresh green beans - or yellow wax beans, purple beans, or multicolored heirloom snap beans - are excellent when fresh and simply prepared. The addition of a simple sauce, like a garlicky mayonnaise, and some fresh herbs, elevates them to something special. For the best version of this you can have, try making your own Homemade Mayonnaise, a sauce that's better than any store-bought version available. This recipe uses fresh garlic, which is available at the market now, but is just as delicious in a few weeks when this year's garlic reaches its familiar, dry, cured state.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. green, yellow, or purple beans
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. To prepare the garlic mayonnaise, chop the garlic coarsely and grind to a smooth paste in a mortar and pestle with a pinch of salt. If you don't have a mortar, chop finely with the salt on a cutting board. Mix with the mayonnaise in a small bowl. Add lemon juice to taste; storebought mayo may need more than homemade.

  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Trim the beans and boil, uncovered, until they are bright green and still have a bit of resistance to the bite, about 3 to 4 minutes. Drain the beans.

  3. While still warm, toss the beans with the mayonnaise; the heat of the beans will thin it to a saucelike consistency. Add the parsley, toss again, and check the seasoning. Serve immediately.