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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 29th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 29th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This Friday is the last market of the 2010 season! We'll be gone until next May, but we will update our website with information on next year's schedule, as well as where you can find some of our vendors between now and then. Please note that updates will appear on the website, but will not go out via email until the market is ready to start up next spring. We will also have some music to send us off this week, when Woody Wolfe stops by with his guitar.

And, of course, we have one last recipe for this year's harvest, a Romanian Cabbage Soup with Bacon, the sort of hearty, filling dish that's perfect in the cooler, darker evenings of autumn.

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 29th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Kale
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Romanian Cabbage Soup with Bacon

Adapted from European Peasant Cookery by Elisabeth Luard (Grub Street, 2004)
Serves 6

Cabbage is a more versatile vegetable than it is sometimes given credit for. The further east one travels through Europe, the more this unassuming but hardy vegetable becomes the backbone of local cuisine. This soup, which is a hearty dish, needs only some good bread and cheese to be a filling meal for a wintry evening.

Ingredients:
  • 1 head green cabbage, cored and sliced
  • 2 thick slices bacon, diced
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 2 green bell peppers, chopped
  • 1 small bunch fresh dill, chopped
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp. vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, cook the bacon until the fat begins to run. Add the onions, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and beginning to turn color. Add the peppers to the pot, cooking until they just become tender.

  2. Add the cabbage, herbs, and about a quart of water to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cover, leaving the lid a bit ajar. Let it simmer about 40 minutes, until everything is tender.

  3. Whisk together the egg yolks, vinegar, and sour cream. Add a ladleful of the soup broth, whisking to combine, and add it all back into the pot. Stir well to combine, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
We'll use the SVGM's website as a place to post information about the market, our vendors, and what to look for next season. Stop by from time to time for updates!

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 22nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 22nd, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The market season is drawing to a close; this Friday will be the next-to-last of the Growers' Markets for 2010. Stock up for the winter while you still can!

Two years ago, we ran a recipe for sweet maple crepes made with local whole wheat flour, and perhaps it's time to think about the possibilities of a more savory version. Scroll down for a Whole Wheat Crepes recipe, one that's just as easy as pancakes, but much more versatile. If you're looking for ideas on what to fill them with, we've listed a handful on the website using some of the very tasty meats and produce available at the market.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 22nd, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Crepes

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Makes about 12

Crepes are a bit like very thin pancakes, made with a batter that's hardly thicker than cream. Their thinness and delicacy make them wonderful wrappers for all sorts of dishes, both sweet and savory, offering a bit of nutty wheat flavor to the package. Making the crepes can be a bit time-consuming, but you can always double or triple the recipe, and carefully wrap and freeze the extras - separated with wax paper - for the future.

Ingredients:
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted, plus more for greasing the pan
  • ½ tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Alternately, you can whisk them together by hand, being sure to combine thoroughly. Cover and allow to stand for at least thirty minutes, or even overnight, to allow the flour to absorb the liquid; this will keep the final crepes tender.

  2. Heat a nonstick pan over medium heat, and coat very lightly with butter. You may wish to use a paper towel to wipe up any excess; the thin film left behind is often just right. Before cooking each crepe, stir the batter, and add about 2 tablespoons to the pan. Lift the pan and rotate so that the batter forms an even, thin layer. Cook until the top sets and the underside is golden brown, then flip and cook a few moments until the second side browns. Serve immediately, or else let cool, wrap tightly, and freeze for later.
* * * * *

On The Website
Crepes are delicious, and can be enjoyed with as little accompaniment as some fresh lemon juice and a sprinkle of powdered sugar. But given how they can transform simple foods - even leftovers! - into something more elegant, we've rounded up a handful of ideas for market-inspired crepe fillings.

Whole Wheat Crepes: Fillings

Filling crepes is a simple task. Just spoon a small amount of filling across the bottom third, and roll over; you can tuck in the sides, as in blintzes, if you like. For a more elegant presentation, you can fill and roll the crepes before serving, leaving the fillings something of a surprise. Or you can arrange the various options on the dinner table, letting the family mix and match their own creations. Here are just a few ideas to get you started:

  • Bacon, Swiss, and greens - Use rich smoked bacon from the pork belly, or use the leaner cottage bacon (made from the pork shoulder) if you prefer. Add a little Swiss cheese, lightly sauteed greens like kale or spinach, and a little garlic or onion for sweetness and flavor.

  • Scrambled eggs and cheddar - Enrich a batch of scrambled eggs with some shredded cheddar - or another favorite - cheese, and consider adding some fresh herbs, like thyme or tarragon.

  • Smoked salmon and cream - This is a perfect place for some flaked hot-smoked salmon, or even leftover cooked salmon. Include a creamy bechamel sauce, thickened up enough to keep from running all over before you wrap the crepe closed.

  • Savory custards - Try a rich custard - like the Savory Cheddar Custard from earlier this year - spooned inside after baking.

  • Chopped fresh vegetables - As long as they're soft enough that they won't puncture the side of the crepe, any vegetables are excellent here. Right now, some fresh broccoli, warmed in a bit of butter, would be lovely, but asparagus is delightful in season, and a mix of tomatoes, onions, and zucchini is ideal at the height of summer.

  • Brie with walnuts - Try some nice, runny Brie or Camembert, sliced, with toasted walnuts. A few thin slices of crisp, fresh apples would be excellent, too.

  • Roast pumpkin and sage - Pumpkin, butternut or delicata squash, roasted until soft, makes a fine filling. Use it as is, seasoned with salt, pepper, and some fresh sage, or mix half and half with some fresh ricotta cheese, and sweeten ever so slightly with maple syrup.

  • Mashed potatoes - Just like you might with blintzes, mashed potatoes would be great here. Add grated cheese, roasted garlic, or whatever you like in your potatoes - or simply use the leftovers from a roast chicken side dish. (Include some of the chicken, too!)

  • Leftovers! - A little bit can go a long way, and wrapping the leftovers from another dinner, be it meats, vegetables, or whatever needs to be used, is the perfect use for crepes. The options are endless.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 15th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 15th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Frost seems to be holding off for the time being, so you can still hope to find some good, cold-sensitive goodies at this week's Growers' Market. Although Clara's Meadow will be away this Friday, you should still be able to find plenty of colorful flowers from Dreisbach Greenhouses, and Mad About Ewes will return after being away last week. Remember, there are just three markets left this season!

Since it's always possible that frosts might hit before Friday morning's vegetable harvest, this week's recipes highlight a few market items that aren't as subject to the whims of the weather. Try a French-inspired Duck with Turnips, which goes especially well with some of the season's fresh broccoli. Or consider some savory Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins as an easy but delicious breakfast treat.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 15th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Turnips
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Duck with Turnips

Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1 by Julia Child (Knopf, 2004)
Serves 6

Duck is such a flavorful bird that you can come at it with several different approaches, letting it hold its own against strong flavors, or, as here, letting the other ingredients provide a subtle background. The turnips in this recipe end up soaking up the duck's cooking juices, making sure all that flavor doesn't go to waste.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole duck
  • 2 lb. turnips
  • A few sprigs fresh herbs: parsley, thyme, bay leaves
  • 1 glass' worth dry white wine
  • 3 tbsp. oil, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Season the duck, inside and out, with salt and pepper, and pat dry. Prick the skin all over, but not so deep as to penetrate the meat. Heat a casserole or roasting pan - one with a tight-fitting lid, if you have it - over medium heat, with the oil. Brown the duck on all sides, then set aside. Pour out any excess oil, and deglaze the pan with the wine, scraping up the flavorful brown bits. (If you don't have a casserole that can take direct heat, use a large skillet, and add the deglazing juices to the casserole with the duck.)

  2. Add the herbs to the duck's cavity, and place in the casserole, covering it tightly, with its lid or a tent of aluminum foil. Roast in the oven for 50 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, peel the turnips and cut them into ¾-inch dice. Blanch them for 3 to 5 minutes in salted, boiling water, then drain.

  3. When the duck has been in the oven for 50 to 60 minutes, remove the cover and degrease the pan, with a bulb baster or carefully with a spoon. Add the turnips all around the duck, baste it all with the juices, and cover again. Put back in the oven until the duck is done, another 30 to 40 minutes. The juices will run a pale rose color when the duck is medium rare; clear yellow when well done. Any time you check the bird, baste it and the turnips again.

  4. When the bird is done, remove to a serving platter, taking the herbs out from the cavity. With a slotted spoon, arrange the turnips around the duck. The remaining juices, with any remaining fat layer removed, make an excellent sauce.
* * * * *

On The Website
Sweet muffins make a fine breakfast, but savory versions fit the bill, too. Filled with fresh pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, and tangy cheddar cheese, these Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins feel like a more substantial way to start out the day, whether it's as part of a large brunch or just a quick bite on the way out the door.

Bonus Recipe, October 15th: Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins

Seasonal Recipe
Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins

Adapted from Martha Goes Green by Rosie Percival and Ruth Friedlander
Makes 12

Pumpkin muffins can be, and often are, sweet, filled with nuts, dried fruit, and spices reminiscent of pumpkin pie. This recipe, which is adapted from one recommended by White Frost Farm, lets the pumpkin's natural sweetness play against the saltiness of cheddar cheese. Any winter squash will work here - after all, that's what pumpkins are - and if you're willing to work with the seeds, they're an excellent textural addition. If not, you can always use hulled pumpkin seeds or sunflower kernels.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups shredded pumpkin (a food processor makes this a snap)
  • ¼ cup hulled pumpkin seeds, ideally from the same pumpkin
  • 1-½ cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard
  • 2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 eggs
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 4 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. In a large bowl, mix together the flours, salt, and baking powder, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Add the pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, most of the cheese (saving some to top the muffins), and parsley, stirring to coat everything evenly.

  2. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, butter, and mustard. Pour over the dry ingredients, and stir until just combined. Spoon into greased muffin tins, enough for 12, and sprinkle the tops with the remaining cheddar cheese. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes clean and the tops and sides are golden brown. Cool on a rack, and feel free to dig in as soon as you can't resist any longer.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 8th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 8th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
There are just four more markets to this season's Growers' Market! The Farm at Stonybrook will be back for the last time this season with herbal teas and seasoning blends, and Wild For Salmon will return after their absence last week. You can also look forward to plenty of beautiful pumpkins - both for eating and for Halloween carving - some big, happy broccoli, and some spicy and fresh arugula now that the weather has begun to cool. Mad About Ewes will be away from market this week, but will return again soon.

Try some of that fresh arugula in salads, or set some aside for a quick and easy Pasta with Arugula and Walnuts. Or, if you have the time to let them cook, stock up on garlic and make a delicious, sweet, and fragrant Chicken and 40 Cloves. It might sound like a lot of garlic, but the results are something especially wonderful.

Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, is back again this week, with his guitar and good spirits. Come listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 8th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pasta with Arugula and Walnuts

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

The range of delicious sauces for pasta is quite broad, and hardly limited to those based on tomatoes or cream. Sometimes, it's preferable to let other flavors shine, especially when tomatoes are no longer at their peak. Here, the bold flavors of arugula, walnuts, garlic, and parmesan cheese make a very simple, very quick, and very flavorful sauce that cooks up in less time than it takes to boil water.

This recipe is best with a whole wheat pasta, which has a more assertive flavor to match the other ingredients. Try making it at home, with fresh eggs and whole wheat flour from White Frost Farm!

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. whole wheat spaghetti, or 4 eggs' worth of fresh pasta
  • 6 cups arugula, coarsely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ cup walnuts, chopped
  • Freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • Several pinches red pepper flakes
  • 4 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the pasta in well-salted water until as tender as you like it.

  2. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the olive oil, and when it is hot, add the garlic and red pepper flakes, stirring until the garlic begins to turn golden. Add the arugula, and stir until it begins to wilt. Turn off the heat, and add the walnuts. When the pasta is done, scoop it from the water into the skillet, with whatever cooking water clings to it. Toss everything together, and serve immediately, topped with the cheese.
* * * * *

On The Website
Garlic, and lots of it! Now is the time of year when gardeners and farmers think about planting next year's harvest of garlic, and the time for cooks to think about ways of slowly cooking those pungent cloves to bring out their intense, nutty sweetness. The quantity may seem shocking, but after making a dish of Chicken and 40 Cloves, you might just wish you'd added a few more to the dish.

Bonus Recipe, October 8th: Chicken and 40 Cloves

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and 40 Cloves

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Garlic is a wonderful addition to so many dishes; its ability to fill so many flavoring roles, from spicy pungency (when raw or nearly so) to a completely different sweet and rich, makes it a valuable item in the pantry. This recipe takes lots of garlic, and after cooking it for a long time with plenty of liquid, leaves the cloves perfect for spreading like butter on fresh bread.

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken, about 4 lbs., cut into pieces
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • ¼ cup olive oil, plus more for browning the chicken
  • 3 large heads garlic, or as much as you like
  • 1 tbsp. Poultry Seasoning from the Farm at Stonybrook
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rub the chicken pieces with the herbal blend, salt and pepper. Rest for at least an hour or two in the refrigerator, if you have the time. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Separate the garlic cloves, but don't peel; the finished garlic will easily squeeze out from its papery skin.

  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the chicken pieces on all sides, doing so in batches to avoid crowding. Arrange the pieces, along with any juices, in an large ovenproof casserole with a lid. (If you don't have a lid, cover very tightly with foil.) Add the garlic cloves, stock, wine, and olive oil. Cover, and cook in the oven until the chicken is fully cooked through, about an hour or more.

  3. Serve the chicken immediately, or keep warm while turning the pan juices into a gravy. (A few mashed cloves of garlic make an excellent thickener.) Serve with plenty of fresh bread, to enjoy the roasted garlic.