.

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 29th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 29th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This Friday is the last market of the 2010 season! We'll be gone until next May, but we will update our website with information on next year's schedule, as well as where you can find some of our vendors between now and then. Please note that updates will appear on the website, but will not go out via email until the market is ready to start up next spring. We will also have some music to send us off this week, when Woody Wolfe stops by with his guitar.

And, of course, we have one last recipe for this year's harvest, a Romanian Cabbage Soup with Bacon, the sort of hearty, filling dish that's perfect in the cooler, darker evenings of autumn.

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 29th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Kale
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Romanian Cabbage Soup with Bacon

Adapted from European Peasant Cookery by Elisabeth Luard (Grub Street, 2004)
Serves 6

Cabbage is a more versatile vegetable than it is sometimes given credit for. The further east one travels through Europe, the more this unassuming but hardy vegetable becomes the backbone of local cuisine. This soup, which is a hearty dish, needs only some good bread and cheese to be a filling meal for a wintry evening.

Ingredients:
  • 1 head green cabbage, cored and sliced
  • 2 thick slices bacon, diced
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 2 green bell peppers, chopped
  • 1 small bunch fresh dill, chopped
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 tbsp. vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, cook the bacon until the fat begins to run. Add the onions, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and beginning to turn color. Add the peppers to the pot, cooking until they just become tender.

  2. Add the cabbage, herbs, and about a quart of water to the pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cover, leaving the lid a bit ajar. Let it simmer about 40 minutes, until everything is tender.

  3. Whisk together the egg yolks, vinegar, and sour cream. Add a ladleful of the soup broth, whisking to combine, and add it all back into the pot. Stir well to combine, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
We'll use the SVGM's website as a place to post information about the market, our vendors, and what to look for next season. Stop by from time to time for updates!

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 22nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 22nd, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The market season is drawing to a close; this Friday will be the next-to-last of the Growers' Markets for 2010. Stock up for the winter while you still can!

Two years ago, we ran a recipe for sweet maple crepes made with local whole wheat flour, and perhaps it's time to think about the possibilities of a more savory version. Scroll down for a Whole Wheat Crepes recipe, one that's just as easy as pancakes, but much more versatile. If you're looking for ideas on what to fill them with, we've listed a handful on the website using some of the very tasty meats and produce available at the market.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 22nd, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Crepes

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Makes about 12

Crepes are a bit like very thin pancakes, made with a batter that's hardly thicker than cream. Their thinness and delicacy make them wonderful wrappers for all sorts of dishes, both sweet and savory, offering a bit of nutty wheat flavor to the package. Making the crepes can be a bit time-consuming, but you can always double or triple the recipe, and carefully wrap and freeze the extras - separated with wax paper - for the future.

Ingredients:
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp. unsalted butter, melted, plus more for greasing the pan
  • ½ tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Alternately, you can whisk them together by hand, being sure to combine thoroughly. Cover and allow to stand for at least thirty minutes, or even overnight, to allow the flour to absorb the liquid; this will keep the final crepes tender.

  2. Heat a nonstick pan over medium heat, and coat very lightly with butter. You may wish to use a paper towel to wipe up any excess; the thin film left behind is often just right. Before cooking each crepe, stir the batter, and add about 2 tablespoons to the pan. Lift the pan and rotate so that the batter forms an even, thin layer. Cook until the top sets and the underside is golden brown, then flip and cook a few moments until the second side browns. Serve immediately, or else let cool, wrap tightly, and freeze for later.
* * * * *

On The Website
Crepes are delicious, and can be enjoyed with as little accompaniment as some fresh lemon juice and a sprinkle of powdered sugar. But given how they can transform simple foods - even leftovers! - into something more elegant, we've rounded up a handful of ideas for market-inspired crepe fillings.

Whole Wheat Crepes: Fillings

Filling crepes is a simple task. Just spoon a small amount of filling across the bottom third, and roll over; you can tuck in the sides, as in blintzes, if you like. For a more elegant presentation, you can fill and roll the crepes before serving, leaving the fillings something of a surprise. Or you can arrange the various options on the dinner table, letting the family mix and match their own creations. Here are just a few ideas to get you started:

  • Bacon, Swiss, and greens - Use rich smoked bacon from the pork belly, or use the leaner cottage bacon (made from the pork shoulder) if you prefer. Add a little Swiss cheese, lightly sauteed greens like kale or spinach, and a little garlic or onion for sweetness and flavor.

  • Scrambled eggs and cheddar - Enrich a batch of scrambled eggs with some shredded cheddar - or another favorite - cheese, and consider adding some fresh herbs, like thyme or tarragon.

  • Smoked salmon and cream - This is a perfect place for some flaked hot-smoked salmon, or even leftover cooked salmon. Include a creamy bechamel sauce, thickened up enough to keep from running all over before you wrap the crepe closed.

  • Savory custards - Try a rich custard - like the Savory Cheddar Custard from earlier this year - spooned inside after baking.

  • Chopped fresh vegetables - As long as they're soft enough that they won't puncture the side of the crepe, any vegetables are excellent here. Right now, some fresh broccoli, warmed in a bit of butter, would be lovely, but asparagus is delightful in season, and a mix of tomatoes, onions, and zucchini is ideal at the height of summer.

  • Brie with walnuts - Try some nice, runny Brie or Camembert, sliced, with toasted walnuts. A few thin slices of crisp, fresh apples would be excellent, too.

  • Roast pumpkin and sage - Pumpkin, butternut or delicata squash, roasted until soft, makes a fine filling. Use it as is, seasoned with salt, pepper, and some fresh sage, or mix half and half with some fresh ricotta cheese, and sweeten ever so slightly with maple syrup.

  • Mashed potatoes - Just like you might with blintzes, mashed potatoes would be great here. Add grated cheese, roasted garlic, or whatever you like in your potatoes - or simply use the leftovers from a roast chicken side dish. (Include some of the chicken, too!)

  • Leftovers! - A little bit can go a long way, and wrapping the leftovers from another dinner, be it meats, vegetables, or whatever needs to be used, is the perfect use for crepes. The options are endless.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 15th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 15th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Frost seems to be holding off for the time being, so you can still hope to find some good, cold-sensitive goodies at this week's Growers' Market. Although Clara's Meadow will be away this Friday, you should still be able to find plenty of colorful flowers from Dreisbach Greenhouses, and Mad About Ewes will return after being away last week. Remember, there are just three markets left this season!

Since it's always possible that frosts might hit before Friday morning's vegetable harvest, this week's recipes highlight a few market items that aren't as subject to the whims of the weather. Try a French-inspired Duck with Turnips, which goes especially well with some of the season's fresh broccoli. Or consider some savory Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins as an easy but delicious breakfast treat.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 15th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Turnips
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli and cauliflower
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Duck with Turnips

Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1 by Julia Child (Knopf, 2004)
Serves 6

Duck is such a flavorful bird that you can come at it with several different approaches, letting it hold its own against strong flavors, or, as here, letting the other ingredients provide a subtle background. The turnips in this recipe end up soaking up the duck's cooking juices, making sure all that flavor doesn't go to waste.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole duck
  • 2 lb. turnips
  • A few sprigs fresh herbs: parsley, thyme, bay leaves
  • 1 glass' worth dry white wine
  • 3 tbsp. oil, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Season the duck, inside and out, with salt and pepper, and pat dry. Prick the skin all over, but not so deep as to penetrate the meat. Heat a casserole or roasting pan - one with a tight-fitting lid, if you have it - over medium heat, with the oil. Brown the duck on all sides, then set aside. Pour out any excess oil, and deglaze the pan with the wine, scraping up the flavorful brown bits. (If you don't have a casserole that can take direct heat, use a large skillet, and add the deglazing juices to the casserole with the duck.)

  2. Add the herbs to the duck's cavity, and place in the casserole, covering it tightly, with its lid or a tent of aluminum foil. Roast in the oven for 50 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, peel the turnips and cut them into ¾-inch dice. Blanch them for 3 to 5 minutes in salted, boiling water, then drain.

  3. When the duck has been in the oven for 50 to 60 minutes, remove the cover and degrease the pan, with a bulb baster or carefully with a spoon. Add the turnips all around the duck, baste it all with the juices, and cover again. Put back in the oven until the duck is done, another 30 to 40 minutes. The juices will run a pale rose color when the duck is medium rare; clear yellow when well done. Any time you check the bird, baste it and the turnips again.

  4. When the bird is done, remove to a serving platter, taking the herbs out from the cavity. With a slotted spoon, arrange the turnips around the duck. The remaining juices, with any remaining fat layer removed, make an excellent sauce.
* * * * *

On The Website
Sweet muffins make a fine breakfast, but savory versions fit the bill, too. Filled with fresh pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, and tangy cheddar cheese, these Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins feel like a more substantial way to start out the day, whether it's as part of a large brunch or just a quick bite on the way out the door.

Bonus Recipe, October 15th: Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins

Seasonal Recipe
Pumpkin and Cheese Muffins

Adapted from Martha Goes Green by Rosie Percival and Ruth Friedlander
Makes 12

Pumpkin muffins can be, and often are, sweet, filled with nuts, dried fruit, and spices reminiscent of pumpkin pie. This recipe, which is adapted from one recommended by White Frost Farm, lets the pumpkin's natural sweetness play against the saltiness of cheddar cheese. Any winter squash will work here - after all, that's what pumpkins are - and if you're willing to work with the seeds, they're an excellent textural addition. If not, you can always use hulled pumpkin seeds or sunflower kernels.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 cups shredded pumpkin (a food processor makes this a snap)
  • ¼ cup hulled pumpkin seeds, ideally from the same pumpkin
  • 1-½ cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard
  • 2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 eggs
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 4 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. In a large bowl, mix together the flours, salt, and baking powder, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Add the pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, most of the cheese (saving some to top the muffins), and parsley, stirring to coat everything evenly.

  2. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, butter, and mustard. Pour over the dry ingredients, and stir until just combined. Spoon into greased muffin tins, enough for 12, and sprinkle the tops with the remaining cheddar cheese. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes clean and the tops and sides are golden brown. Cool on a rack, and feel free to dig in as soon as you can't resist any longer.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 8th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 8th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
There are just four more markets to this season's Growers' Market! The Farm at Stonybrook will be back for the last time this season with herbal teas and seasoning blends, and Wild For Salmon will return after their absence last week. You can also look forward to plenty of beautiful pumpkins - both for eating and for Halloween carving - some big, happy broccoli, and some spicy and fresh arugula now that the weather has begun to cool. Mad About Ewes will be away from market this week, but will return again soon.

Try some of that fresh arugula in salads, or set some aside for a quick and easy Pasta with Arugula and Walnuts. Or, if you have the time to let them cook, stock up on garlic and make a delicious, sweet, and fragrant Chicken and 40 Cloves. It might sound like a lot of garlic, but the results are something especially wonderful.

Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, is back again this week, with his guitar and good spirits. Come listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 8th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pasta with Arugula and Walnuts

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

The range of delicious sauces for pasta is quite broad, and hardly limited to those based on tomatoes or cream. Sometimes, it's preferable to let other flavors shine, especially when tomatoes are no longer at their peak. Here, the bold flavors of arugula, walnuts, garlic, and parmesan cheese make a very simple, very quick, and very flavorful sauce that cooks up in less time than it takes to boil water.

This recipe is best with a whole wheat pasta, which has a more assertive flavor to match the other ingredients. Try making it at home, with fresh eggs and whole wheat flour from White Frost Farm!

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. whole wheat spaghetti, or 4 eggs' worth of fresh pasta
  • 6 cups arugula, coarsely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ cup walnuts, chopped
  • Freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • Several pinches red pepper flakes
  • 4 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the pasta in well-salted water until as tender as you like it.

  2. Meanwhile, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the olive oil, and when it is hot, add the garlic and red pepper flakes, stirring until the garlic begins to turn golden. Add the arugula, and stir until it begins to wilt. Turn off the heat, and add the walnuts. When the pasta is done, scoop it from the water into the skillet, with whatever cooking water clings to it. Toss everything together, and serve immediately, topped with the cheese.
* * * * *

On The Website
Garlic, and lots of it! Now is the time of year when gardeners and farmers think about planting next year's harvest of garlic, and the time for cooks to think about ways of slowly cooking those pungent cloves to bring out their intense, nutty sweetness. The quantity may seem shocking, but after making a dish of Chicken and 40 Cloves, you might just wish you'd added a few more to the dish.

Bonus Recipe, October 8th: Chicken and 40 Cloves

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and 40 Cloves

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Garlic is a wonderful addition to so many dishes; its ability to fill so many flavoring roles, from spicy pungency (when raw or nearly so) to a completely different sweet and rich, makes it a valuable item in the pantry. This recipe takes lots of garlic, and after cooking it for a long time with plenty of liquid, leaves the cloves perfect for spreading like butter on fresh bread.

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken, about 4 lbs., cut into pieces
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • ¼ cup olive oil, plus more for browning the chicken
  • 3 large heads garlic, or as much as you like
  • 1 tbsp. Poultry Seasoning from the Farm at Stonybrook
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rub the chicken pieces with the herbal blend, salt and pepper. Rest for at least an hour or two in the refrigerator, if you have the time. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Separate the garlic cloves, but don't peel; the finished garlic will easily squeeze out from its papery skin.

  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, brown the chicken pieces on all sides, doing so in batches to avoid crowding. Arrange the pieces, along with any juices, in an large ovenproof casserole with a lid. (If you don't have a lid, cover very tightly with foil.) Add the garlic cloves, stock, wine, and olive oil. Cover, and cook in the oven until the chicken is fully cooked through, about an hour or more.

  3. Serve the chicken immediately, or keep warm while turning the pan juices into a gravy. (A few mashed cloves of garlic make an excellent thickener.) Serve with plenty of fresh bread, to enjoy the roasted garlic.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

News from the SVGM - October 1st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 1st, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The Growers' Market is quickly coming to the end of the 2010 season! These October Fridays will be the last until spring returns, with just five markets remaining. Many of our vendors will still have meats, eggs, produce, and more available when the market days are past, so don't forget to ask about winter pickups and deliveries before it's too late!

Despite its sometimes less-than-stellar reputation among kids and former presidents, broccoli is a delicious, healthy, and versatile vegetable. With its assertive flavor, it can stand up to a variety of other ingredients. For example, you can use it in your own version of that Chinese restaurant standby, Beef with Broccoli and Oyster Sauce, or use it with leftover roast chicken in a Chicken and Broccoli Gratin.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 1st, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Broccoli
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Hot and sweet peppers
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Wool yarn for knitting and weaving
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Beef with Broccoli and Oyster Sauce

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma: Asian by Farina Wong Kingsley (Simon & Schuster, 2003)
Serves 4 to 6

Most of us know the standard "beef and broccoli" that's available on the takeout menu of just about every Chinese restaurant in the United States, as ubiquitous as General Tso's Chicken. While it can be a cheap, guilty pleasure for lazy evenings, this dish of thinly sliced beef stir-fried with broccoli florets and a rich, sweet sauce can become something quite good when made with high-quality ingredients. It's a flexible recipe, in which the meat and vegetable can be swapped out to work with what's fresh and tasty.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. beef flank steak
  • 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. cornstarch
  • ¾ tsp. sugar
  • 1/8 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tbsp. oyster sauce
  • 2 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 2 cups small broccoli florets
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 slices fresh ginger, smashed
  • 1 small yellow onion, in 1-inch pieces
  • 1 tbsp. rice wine or water
  • Peanut oil, for cooking
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Slice the steak along the grain, into pieces about 3 inches long and ¼-inch thick. You may find this easier if you place the meat in the freezer for 30 minutes, which will firm it up a bit. Combine the beef slices in a bowl with 2 tbsp. water, 1 tbsp. cornstarch, ¼ tsp. salt. ¼ tsp. sugar, and the baking soda. Let stand 30 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce, 2 tbsp. water, a pinch white pepper, and the remaining sugar and cornstarch. Set aside. In boiling water, blanch the broccoli florets until just tender, about 3 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.

  3. Pat the beef strips dry with paper towels. Heat a wok or skillet over medium-high heat, and cook the beef in peanut oil until just opaque, about 3 or 4 minutes. Remove from the wok, and, adding extra oil if necessary, add the garlic and ginger. Stir-fry until fragrant and golden-brown, less than a minute, and remove. Add the onion, and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes more.

  4. When the onion is cooked, add the rice wine to the pan, and quickly scrape up any browned bits. Add the soy sauce mixture, and bring to a boil, adding the beef and broccoli as it does. Stir until the sauce thickens and everything is heated through, just a minute or two. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
A whole roast chicken can sometimes be a lot of food for just a few people to have at one meal. Leftovers are probably inevitable, but that doesn't mean that they have to be relegated to the soup pot or microwave reheating. Try combining them with some fresh broccoli and a rich, creamy sauce in a Chicken and Broccoli Gratin.

Bonus Recipe, October 1st: Chicken and Broccoli Gratin

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and Broccoli Gratin

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)

As with all leftovers-based recipes, this is one in which the quantities - of ingredients, of servings - are quite flexible, enough to suit whatever you have on hand. It does call for a bit of bechamel sauce, which is simply a white sauce of milk thickened with a roux (like in this other cheesy broccoli recipe from last year).

Ingredients:

  • Half a roasted chicken
  • 1 lb. broccoli, trimmed and cooked
  • 2 cups bechamel sauce
  • 2 cups chicken stock (made from the roasted chicken bones, if you like)
  • 2 tsp. tarragon
  • 4 tbsp. vermouth or white wine
  • 6 tbsp. cream
  • 2 tbsp. grated cheddar cheese
  • Breadcrumbs
  • 2 tbsp. butter, melted, plus more for the pan
  • A pinch nutmeg
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Pull the meat from the chicken bones, and cut it into pieces. Arrange them in a large, shallow, lightly buttered, ovenproof dish. Layer with the broccoli so that it looks attractive; this will all depend on how much you have of the various leftovers.

  2. In a saucepan, bring the bechamel, stock, and tarragon to a boil, and reduce by half. Add the vermouth, cream, and nutmeg, and adjust the seasoning to taste. It should be a bit on the thick side. Stir in the grated cheese. Pour it all over the chicken and broccoli.

  3. Scatter breadcrumbs ovet the top, and drizzle the melted butter over. Bake until it bubbles at the edges and the chicken has heated through. Serve immediately.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

News from the SVGM - September 24th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 24th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Autumn is officially upon us, and there can't be much left of summer's heat. There are just a few weeks left for this season's Growers' Market, so start thinking about stocking up on storage vegetables, frozen meats, and other locally-produced treats before November arrives!

With cooling weather comes an appetite for warming, filling comfort food. When you're looking for some ideas to keep away the chill, you can try these recipes: Chicken and Sausage Gumbo simmering on the stove, filling the kitchen and house with it rich aromas, or Roasted Carrots with Pomegranate Vinaigrette slowly browning and turning irresistible in the oven.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 24th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Carrots
  • Hot and sweet peppers
  • Green beans
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Wool yarn for knitting and weaving
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and Sausage Gumbo

Adapted from The Frugal Gourmet Cooks American by Jeff Smith (Wm. Morrow, 1987)
Serves 6

Gumbo takes a variety of forms, often based on what's fresh at the market and what's waiting in the pantry. This is just one version, using file powder as a thickener. Should you be fortunate enough to have fresh okra handy, at the peak of summer's heat, feel free to use it instead.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. smoked pork sausage, diced
  • 1 small chicken, cut up
  • ½ cup peanut oil
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 bunch green onions, chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2-½ cups chicken stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • ½ tsp. basil
  • Pinch cloves
  • Pinch allspice
  • ¼ cup file powder, or to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large saucepan, brown the sausage, in a bit of oil, over medium heat. Remove from the pan, and add the remaining oil. Brown the chicken pieces, in batches to avoid crowding, and set aside with the sausage.

  2. Add the flour to the pan, and cook, stirring, until the roux reaches the color of peanut butter. Scrape the bottom frequently with a wooden spoon to ensure it doesn't stick and burn. Add the vegetables and garlic, and cook until softened, the cover with the chicken stock. Stir while bringing to a boil, until it begins to thicken. Add the remaining seasonings, and simmer for an hour.

  3. Add the sausage and chicken to the soup, and continue simmering until the chicken is cooked through. Thicken as desired with the file, and serve immediately, with plenty of long-grain rice.
* * * * *

On The Website
Root vegetables are sweet and delicious, and there's no reason to relegate them to filler status in wintry stews. Roasted Carrots with Pomegranate Vinaigrette is just one way to let the flavor and color of these fine vegetables shine.

Bonus Recipe, September 24th: Roasted Carrots with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Seasonal Recipe
Roasted Carrots with Pomegranate Vinaigrette

Adapted from Earthbound Farm Organic
Serves 6

Carrots are inherently sweet, and roasting enhances that sweetness. The same goes for other sweet vegetables, which would also benefit from this treatment. Try this dressing with beets, parsnips, or winter squash; like carrots, the rich orange color of the latter looks really sharp against the deep garnet of the pomegranate.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ lb. carrots
  • 4 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. fresh thyme
  • 2 tbsp. pomegranate molasses (See note, below.)
  • 2 tbsp. shallots, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp. sherry vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Trim the carrots, if necessary. They should all be the same size, large or small, to ensure they cook evenly. Toss the carrots with 1 tbsp. olive oil, and season with salt, pepper, and thyme. Arrange in a baking dish and roast until tender and beginning to caramelize, about 30 to 40 minutes.

  2. Whisk together the pomegranate molasses, shallots, vinegar, salt and the remaining olive oil in a small saucepan. Heat until jsut warm, and dress the roasted carrots. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Note: If you are unable to find pomegranate molasses, you can make a close replacement. Place 3 cups pomegranate juice, 3 tbsp. sugar, and 2 tbsp. lemon juice in a saucepan. Reduce until you have just ¾ cup remaining, about 45 minutes. Allow to cool, and it will thicken. Tightly sealed, it will last at least a month in the refrigerator.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

News from the SVGM - September 17th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 17th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This may be the last week for ripe tomatoes at the Growers' Market, but the winter squash and pumpkins are coming to take their place. We're also nearing the end of green tomato season, so if you're looking for fried green tomatoes or homemade piccalilli, now's the time. You can check out the website information from last week to find a great recipe for Pickled Green Tomatoes by following the link to the NPR story.

Since winter squash are finally here, it's time to start thinking about those warming dishes that come in all the colors of fall, from roasted meats and vegetables, to autumn's sweet pies, to uncommon treats like a spicy-sweet Thai Pumpkin Soup. Or enjoy the last delights of summer vegetables with a dish like Hunanese Green Peppers with Pork and Greens.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 17th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Apples
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Wool yarn for knitting and weaving
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Thai Pumpkin Soup

Adapted from Asian Soups by Suzie Smith (Lansdowne, 2000)
Serves 4

Pumpkin soups are generally smooth and creamy, taking advantage of the way the pumpkin flesh breaks down to a rich, sweet unctuousness. This version takes a different approach, in the Thai tradition of keeping the pumpkin intact in tenderly cooked pieces. The broth's richness instead comes from coconut milk, which coats the pumpkin pieces in a rich, sweet, spicy, and fragrant broth. Any winter squash or pumpkin worth eating will work here. (In other words, avoid the big, orange jack o'lantern pumpkins.)

Ingredients:
  • 12 oz. pumpkin or winter squash, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 tbsp. lime juice
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 inches fresh ginger, chopped
  • 3 hot peppers
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp. shrimp paste
  • 3 cups coconut milk
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock, or water
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • ½ cup basil leaves, torn, for garnish (optional)
Directions:
  1. Place the pumpkin pieces in a bowl with the lime juice. Set aside.

  2. Using a mortar or a food processor, pound or process the onion, garlic, ginger, peppers, lemongrass, and shrimp paste into a smooth paste. Combine this paste with ¼ cup coconut milk in a large saucepan, and place over medium-high heat. Cook until fragrant and slightly reduced, about 5 minutes. Add the rest of the coconut milk, along with the stock and fish sauce, and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Simmer 5 minutes.

  3. Add the pumpkin pieces and lime juice, and simmer until tender, about 10 to 15 minutes. Check the seasoning, and adjust with more fish sauce or lime juice as needed. Serve immediately, adding the basil leaves to the top of individual bowls as garnish.
* * * * *

On The Website
Most Chinese restaurants in the US serve dishes based on the relatively mild Cantonese cuisine, but China's an awfully big country. Further inland, in Hunan province, they like their food rich and spicy, like this recipe for Hunanese Green Peppers with Pork and Greens. Combined with the slight bitterness of the green peppers and the gentle sweetness of pork, it's an excellent way to turn a few basic ingredients into a intensely-flavored side dish.

Bonus Recipe, September 17th: Hunanese Green Peppers with Pork and Greens

Seasonal Recipe
Hunanese Green Peppers with Pork and Greens

Adapted from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2006)
Serves 4 as a side

Unlike in many Western cuisines, a homestyle Chinese dinner often involves several dishes prepared in various ways, like a collection of side dishes with no real "main" entree. Most dishes will combine vegetables and meat, with the latter often in small quantities for flavoring. This is a typical example, which uses just a little ground pork to add richness and a slight sweetness to the dish.

Vegetarians can, of course, omit the pork. Finely chopped mushrooms make a fine substitute. The original recipe also calls for preserved mustard greens, which are a salty, fermented vegetable available from Asian specialty stores. If you happen to have them, you can use them instead of the chard called for here.

Ingredients:

  • 9 oz. green bell peppers, in ½-inch dice
  • 3 oz. chard leaves, cut into thin strips
  • 3 oz. ground pork
  • 1 tsp. Shaoxing wine or sherry
  • 1 tsp garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 3 tbsp. peanut oil or lard, for cooking
  • Salt to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat a wok or skillet over medium heat, and add just a tiny bit of oil. Add the green peppers, and stir fry for a few minutes until they have softened a bit and become fragrant. Remove from the wok and set aside.

  2. Turn the heat to medium-high, and add the remaining oil. Stir-fry the pork until it has changed color, and add the Shaoxing wine and a little salt. Add the garlic and chard, and continue stirring until the garlic is fragrant and the chard begins wilting. Add a splash of water to slow the cooking if necessary, which will allow the chard to cook through without burning the garlic. Toss in the red pepper flakes, then the green peppers. Check for seasoning, and serve immediately.

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

News from the SVGM - September 10th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 10th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
With Labor Day comes some very autumn-like weather, it seems, which means we're about to shift from the hot-weather tomato bounty to heartier vegetables like pumpkins, cool-weather greens, and more in the coming weeks. Enjoy them now, or head to our website for some links to good sources for information on canning those tomatoes (and peaches, and peppers, and more) to enjoy when winter has arrived in full force.

The Farm at Stonybrook will be at market this week, with a selection herbal teas and dried herb blends. Herbal teas, without caffeine, are excellent for a morning pick-me-up or a relaxing cup of warmth in the evening, but have you ever tried cooking with them? Check below for a variation on the traditional Chinese tea eggs using an herbal blend, Lemon Tea Eggs.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 10th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons
  • Concord grapes
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Wool yarn for knitting and weaving
  • Dried herbs and teas
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Lemon Tea Eggs

Adapted from The New Tea Book by Sara Perry (Chronicle, 2001)
Makes 6 to 10 eggs

You can use any tea that you like for this recipe, but replacing the traditional black tea with an intensely lemony herbal blend from the market can be an exciting change. Try these lemon-scented eggs in a salad of fresh greens, or alongside a selection of fresh fruit and ripe cheeses from the SVGM.

Ingredients:
  • 6 to 10 hard-cooked eggs
  • 3 to 4 cups tea brewed with the Farm at Stonybrook's Lota Lota Lemon blend
  • 1 tbsp. kosher salt
  • Zest of a lemon
  • Zest of an orange
Directions:
  1. Use the back of a spoon to crack the eggshells all over, so that the tea is able to seep through the shells. Put the tea, salt, and citrus zest in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Add the eggs carefully, using a slotted spoon. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour. Shut off the heat and allow the eggs to steep another 30 minutes. Remove from the tea, cool, and use immediately or refrigerate until needed.
* * * * *

On The Website
Tomatoes, tomatoes! Now's the time to enjoy them, and to stock up for the ever-nearer end of the 2010 tomato season. We've collected some information for first-time canners on our website, so that you can turn the season's fresh bounty into something you can enjoy months from now.

Canning tomatoes and more!

Ever look at the ripe, organically grown tomatoes at the Growers' Market and wished you could enjoy them year-round? Home canning is an easy and simple way to preserve a range of seasonal foods, be they vine-ripened tomatoes or fresh-from-the-tree peaches. Some of our vendors, including White Frost Farm and Dreisbach Greenhouses, often have "seconds" of tomatoes that look a little less than perfect, but taste wonderful and are perfect for setting aside for enjoyment throughout the winter.

Just last week, National Public Radio ran a story about canning to deal with a bountiful garden harvest, and they offer up plenty of tips and photos to whet your appetite and get you started. The print version of "Overloaded From Your Garden? Just Can It" can be found on NPR's website: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129402166&sc=emaf

There are a ton of internet references out there, but the most reliable, well-informed information comes from the National Center for Home Food Preservation at the University of Georgia and from the USDA. Here are a few links to get first-timers started, and for experienced canners to brush up their skills:

National Center for Home Food Preservation - http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/index.html - In addition to canning, this site includes information on pickling, dehydrating, and various other ways to preserve a wide range of good foods from the market, not just tomatoes and fresh fruits.

NCHFP's Canning Information - http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html - For information specifically related to canning foods at home.

USDA Canning Guide - http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/usda/GUIDE%201%20Home%20Can.pdf - The USDA's guidelines for home canning, in PDF form. More, and more specific information, can be found through the NCHFP website.

USDA Tomato Canning Guide - http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/usda/GUIDE%203%20Home%20Can.pdf - For those planning to can tomatoes, this is the direct link to what you need to know.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

News from the SVGM - September 3rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 3rd, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
With the arrival of September and, hopefully, of cooler weather, the Growers' Market welcomes another new vendor. Mad About Ewes will be at the SVGM this Friday, with wool from their own flock of sheep. They raise the sheep, process the wool, and have a variety for spinning, knitting, and other projects to keep you busy before sweater weather arrives.

Eggplant is a genuine summer delight. Although it's possible to preserve it in a handful of ways, it doesn't often have the same versatility of canned tomatoes, frozen corn, or pickled peppers. So, while you can still get it fresh and sweet - and freshly picked eggplant definitely lacks the inherent bitterness of the purple monsters sitting at the grocery store - here are a pair of unusual recipes that let the flavor of good, local eggplant shine. Match them with ripe bell peppers for Eggplant and Peppers with Miso, or try them alongside green beans and sesame in Eggplant with Sesame Sauce.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 3rd, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Garlic jelly
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Edamame
  • Melons
  • Concord grapes
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Eggplant and Peppers with Miso

Adapted from Japanese Home Style CookingBetter Home Japan (Better Home Publishing House, 1986)
Serves 4

Eggplant are a summer vegetable, without doubt, one that adores the sort of heat that makes most of us wilt. Paired with green bell peppers, this quick and simple stir-fry is pure Japanese home cooking. While it is best with the long, skinny types of eggplant, any that are fresh and delicious will certainly do. More adventurous palates might like to add a bit of hot pepper to this, as well; it's even better that way.

Don't worry if you don't have a well-stocked Japanese pantry. Mirin, sake, and dashi are all tasty in this recipe, but not essential; the flavor of the miso is what dominates, so use what you have on hand.

Ingredients:
  • 5 Japanese eggplant
  • 3 green bell peppers
  • 4 tbsp. sesame oil
  • 2-½ tbsp. miso paste
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 tbsp. mirin (rice wine)
  • 2 tsp. sake
  • 2 tsp. dashi stock
Directions:
  1. Trim the stems from the eggplant, and peel thin strips of skin away, leaving about half on the eggplant. Cut into ½-inch slices. Soak in water for 5 minutes, then drain. Meanwhile, remove the stems and seeds from the peppers, and cut them into bite-size pieces.

  2. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat, adding the sesame oil. Cook the eggplant for a few minutes, then add the green peppers, stirring frequently. When the vegetables are soft, add the miso and sugar. Stir constantly, until the miso just starts to burn. Add the mirin, sake, and dashi stock, reduce the heat to medium, and cook, still stirring, until most of the liquid has evaporated. Transfer to a serving dish and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
For an uncommon approach to eggplant, steamed in a traditional Japanese manner, try Eggplant with Sesame Sauce. It turns the large eggplant that make such excellent Eggplant Parmesan into something worlds away, but absolutely delicious.

Bonus Recipe, September 3rd: Eggplant with Sesame Sauce

Seasonal Recipe
Eggplant with Sesame Sauce

Adapted from The Cook's Encyclopedia of Japanese Cooking by Emi Kazuko (Barnes & Noble, 2003)
Serves 4

In the typical Western kitchen, eggplant is put through a range of cooking methods, from frying to roasting to grilling. Even those of us adding them to south or southeast Asian curries end up simply cooking them in a boiling or simmering sauce. In Japan and China, however, eggplant is just as likely to end up in the steamer, for recipes that often capitalize on the eggplant's natural flavor, rather than just its firm and meaty texture.

This particular recipe is an example of the type of cooking found at Japanese Zen temples, using simple, seasonal ingredients. Although this recipe, like much of Japanese cooking, calls for dashi stock, made from bonito flakes and kombu kelp, it can be made with vegetable stock or water with very good results.

Ingredients:

  • 2 large eggplant
  • ¼ lb. mushrooms, preferably enoki or shiitake
  • ¾ cup green beans
  • 2 to 2-½ cups dashi stock, vegetable stock, or water
  • 3 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp. sesame seeds, ground
  • 2 tbsp. sake
  • 1 tbsp. cornstarch
  • Salt to taste
Directions:
  1. Peel the eggplant, and cut into quarters along their length. Place in a bowl full of salted water for 30 minutes. Drain, then steam over medium heat until soft, about 20 minutes.

  2. In a skillet, mix together 1-2/3 cups dashi stock, 1-½ tbsp. sugar, 1 tbsp. soy sauce, and a pinch of salt. Add the eggplant and cook over low heat for about 15 minutes, then add the sesame seeds. Mix the sake (or water) with the cornstarch, and add to the pan. Shake the pan to mix, and remove from the heat once the sauce thickens.

  3. While the eggplant is cooking, trim the mushrooms and green beans. Mix together the remaining dashi stock, soy sauce, and sugar in a pan, and cook the vegetables over medium heat until just tender, 5 to 10 minutes, depending on your mushrooms and the size of your beans.

  4. To serve, arrange the eggplant, with its sauce, in individual bowls, topped with the other vegetables. Serve warm.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

News from the SVGM - August 27th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 27th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is slipping away from us, but you can still find plenty to enjoy at the Growers' Market as the summer's heat starts to fade. Fresh edamame (soybeans in the pod) are here to enjoy, simply boiled, salted, and with a cold beer; sweet grapes have joined the peaches and nectarines; and the new taleggio cheese from Stone Meadow Farm is well worth seeking out for cheese lovers. And this will also be the first week for White Frost Farm's very own garlic jelly!

Combining a strong aroma and a mild, creamy flavor, the taleggio cheese is something fans of camembert and brie will undoubtedly enjoy. Try it on some Bruschetta with Taleggio and Tomato, using some of the colorful and flavorful heirloom varieties from our vendors. It's a best-on-the-grill sort of recipe, so you might want to consider a few Grilled Peaches while the coals are hot, too.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 27th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Edamame
  • Melons
  • Concord grapes
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Bruschetta with Taleggio and Tomato

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

The best-tasting bruschetta starts with good, crusty bread browned over a grill, although a broiler, or even a toaster, if you're really strapped, will do. Any artisan-style bread you like will do, as long as the holes in the crumb aren't so large that food will fall through.

Ingredients:
  • 8 thick (up to an inch) slices crusty bread, such as a baguette
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • 4 oz. taleggio cheese
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Core the tomatoes, and slice into rounds. Arrange on a rack and sprinkle with salt, allowing any excess liquid to drip away. Meanwhile, preheat a charcoal or gas grill to moderately hot.

  2. Lay the slices of bread on the grill grate, checking frequently until the first side is lightly browned. A few charred spots or grill marks are a good, flavorful thing. When the first side is ready, remove briefly to a plate. Rub the toasted side with the garlic cloves, drizzle with olive oil, and top each with cheese as thin as you can slice it. Return to the grill to toast the other side and melt the cheese a bit.

  3. Top the finished bruschetta with the tomato slices, and serve immediately. They're best while still warm, before the tomato juices have a chance to soften the bread.
* * * * *

On The Website
There's hardly anything to them, really, but some sweet, warm Grilled Peaches are a nigh-irresistible summer delight. (They work under the broiler, too, but peach season is outdoor cooking season anyhow.)

Bonus Recipe, August 27th: Grilled Peaches

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Peaches

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Fruit Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)

A word to the wise: this recipe comes from a British source, meaning that Ms. Grigson's use of the term "grill" is probably not the same as yours. (It means a broiler.) That said, peaches grilled over hot charcoal can be excellent, though you need to watch them closely.

Ingredients:

  • 6 ripe freestone peaches
  • 4 tbsp. butter
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup bourbon, rum, or brandy
  • ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • Vanilla ice cream or whipped cream
Directions:
  1. Combine the butter, brown sugar, bourbon, and cinnamon in a saucepan, and bring to a boil. Cook until thick and syrupy, about 5 minutes. Set aside.

  2. Preheat your grill to fairly hot. Halve and stone the peaches. Optionally, you can skewer the peaches like kebabs, running a pair of parallel metal skewers through each half, which will make maneuvering them over the hot grill much easier.

  3. Cook the peaches until they brown nicely, about 3 or 4 minutes per side, while basting them with the bourbon syrup. Serve immediately, drizzling any extra syrup over the top, with vanilla ice cream.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

News from the SVGM - August 20th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 20th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Is it almost the end of August, already? Near the end of summer, the start of a new school year? For the Growers' Market, it also means the return of Wild For Salmon! They've returned from this year's fishing season in Alaska's Bristol Bay with plenty of wonderful, wild-caught salmon.

With that in mind, we have a pair of recipes for those excited to take home some delicious fish! Take some freshly-dug potatoes and combine them with salmon - fresh or smoked - to create some Scottish Salmon Fishcakes. Or, to beat the heat, try serving some simple and elegant Cold-Poached Salmon with Cucumber-Mint Sauce.

He dropped by for a surprise visit last week, and he's back again this Friday! Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will be at the market with his guitar and good spirits. Come listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 20th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Scottish Salmon Fishcakes

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)
Makes 4 fishcakes

Half a world away from Alaska's Bristol Bay, Scottish fishermen have been pulling their own wild salmon from the icy waters of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. This recipe combines cooked salmon with potato to create an easy meal that's excellent with the season's vegetables. You can cook salmon directly for this recipe, use leftovers from another evening's meal, or even use some of Wild For Salmon's excellent hot-smoked salmon for part or all.

Ingredients:
  • ½ lb. cold, cooked salmon, flaked
  • 2 medium leeks or onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 shallots, finely diced
  • 14 oz. potatoes, cooked and coarsely mashed
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 1 egg
  • Oil, for frying
  • Flour, for dredging
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Over medium-low heat, cook the leeks, shallots and garlic until softened but not browned, about 8 minutes. In a bowl, combine the salmon and potato with the cooked leeks. Mix together gently, adjusting the seasoning to taste. Divide into four parts, and shape each into a round cake.

  2. Beat the egg in a bowl, and put a good bit of flour in another. One by one, dip each cake into the egg to coat, then in the flour. Shallow-fry in oil over medium heat until well-browned, about 5 minutes per side. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Salmon's an all-around excellent cooking (and eating) fish, and it's worth considering cold serving options in the dog days of summer. A dish of Cold-Poached Salmon with Cucumber-Mint Sauce, served with fresh bread and some fresh vegetables, is a perfect way to celebrate a season of plentiful food.

Bonus Recipe, August 20th: Cold-Poached Salmon with Cucumber-Mint Sauce

Seasonal Recipe
Cold-Poached Salmon with Cucumber-Mint Sauce

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)

Salmon can be cooked in many ways; after all, it's one fish that can reliably stand up to the grill, which is more than one can ask of a lot of other seafood. When you plan to serve salmon cold, or at room temperature, though, it's best to take care to ensure a moist, flavorful result. Poaching takes care of this, and can reliably be done ahead of time, enabling you to cook it when you have the time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole salmon fillet, or salmon fillet portions
  • 1 medium cucumber
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 2 tsp. minced shallots
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 3 tbsp. fresh mint leaves, minced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place the salmon, skin side down, in a pan large enough to accommodate it without overlapping. cover with cold, well-salted water. (You can also use stock, wine, or any flavorful liquid you like.) Cover the pan tightly. Bring to a boil, and immediately shut off the heat. Allow the salmon to rest in the hot water until cooked through, about 10 minutes. Check for doneness with a thin-bladed knife, taking care to avoid overcooking. Remove from the water, drain, and chill until needed.

  2. Peel the cucumber and cut in half lengthwise. Scoop out the seeds, and chop into ½-inch dice. (Or you can grate it.) Combine in a bowl with the yogurt, shallots, olive oil, mint, salt and pepper. Refrigerate until needed, but it's best when used the same day. Serve alongside the poached salmon, with fresh bread and raw vegetables.

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

News from the SVGM - August 13th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 13th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Whew, is it ever a hot and dry August this year! It might be the sort of weather that sends you running for ice-filled drinks, shade, air conditioning, or a little of all three, but it's not all rough times. This year seems to be especially good for producing especially sweet melons, like those from Dreisbach Greenhouses. They're delicious, and so we have two melon-centric recipes for this week: a simple Melon and Ginger Jam that's lovely with green-fleshed melons like honeydew, and a refreshing Melon and Cucumber Salad that's excellent with any ripe melon.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 13th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Melons
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Eggplant
  • Sweet corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh herbs
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and handmade chocolates
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Melon and Ginger Jam

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Fruit Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)

Melons are known, and rightly so, for the fact that a few ripe wedges in season are just about the best dessert around. Their season is a relatively short one, however, and here's a way to extend your enjoyment a bit. This simple refrigerator jam combines melon and ginger with a bit of lemon for an excellent breakfast spread. Use crystallized ginger for a sweet jam that's perfect for toast and tea; try substituting fresh ginger for a spicier version that can match well with some of the fine soft cheeses from Stone Meadow Farm.

Ingredients:
  • 2 lb. green-fleshed melon, such as honeydew
  • 2 lb. sugar, about 4 cups
  • Zest and juice of 4 lemons
  • 5 oz. ginger, either crystallized or fresh, finely chopped
Directions:
  1. Cut the melon into cubes, and place in a large bowl with the sugar. Cover and rest in the refrigerator overnight. The next day, transfer the juicy, melon-y mixture into a large saucepan. Add the lemon zest, juice, and the ginger. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Simmer until the melon becomes transparent, about 30 to 45 minutes.

  2. Bring to the boil again, cooking until the jam reaches your preferred setting point. You can test this by chilling a plate, and dropping a bit of the jam on it to cool. When thickened to your taste, remove from the heat. Refrigerated, the jam should keep well for several weeks.
* * * * *

On The Website
Melons and cucumbers are botanical cousins, and can complement each other well. Use whatever varieties you like, from cantaloupe to honeydew to watermelon, in this summery Melon and Cucumber Salad, which makes a fine alternative to that picnic staple, the fruit salad.

Bonus Recipe, August 13th: Melon and Cucumber Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Melon and Cucumber Salad

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4

This salad is a simple appetizer, balancing the fresh flavors of melon and cucumber with the brightness of lime juice and the gentle spiciness of pepper, mint, and arugula.

Ingredients:

  • ½ melon - honeydew, cantaloupe, watermelon - peeled and cut into narrow wedges
  • 3 cucumbers, peeled and cut lengthwise into sixths
  • 2 cups arugula, watercress, or other greens
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Lay down the greens as a bed, and arrange the melon and cucumber pieces on top, alternating to show off their color. Drizzle with the lime juice, and season very lightly with salt, and generously with pepper. Serve immediately as summery finger food.

Wednesday, August 4, 2010

News from the SVGM - August 6th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 6th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is here, and the tomatoes are ripe and delicious, the corn is sweet, and there's some fine tree fruit for snacking and baking. Cow-a-Hen Farm and Anna & Ezra Peachy are back from vacation this week, so keep an eye out for them, as well as wheat berries and flour from White Frost Farm and new Chambord truffles from Fleur & Chocolat.

Or combine some fresh plums from Bella's Gardens with a fresh chicken from Beaver Run Farms for some Plum-Barbecued Chicken. For dessert, why not enjoy a Peach Upside-Down Cake, warm and topped with fresh whipped cream?

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 6th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Eggplant
  • Sweet corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Hungarian wax peppers and banana peppers
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh herbs
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and baked goods
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh goat cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Plum-Barbecued Chicken

Adapted from Seasons of Central Pennsylvania by Anne Quinn Corr (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000)
Serves 6 to 8

Plums are sweet and super-juicy, as likely to end up dribbling down as the best peaches. Given that, they can be tough to cook with, unless their natural juiciness can be put to good use. This recipe combines sweet plums with some of the other treats of summer, including some hot chillis, for a sweet-spicy sauce that's excellent for grilled chicken.

This recipe calls for a habanero pepper, which lends both a wallop of heat and a lovely fruitiness to the sauce. If that's too much heat for you, however, you can always substitute another pepper that won't send you running for a cold drink. Just be sure to wear gloves when handling them; getting the fiery capsaicin in your eyes is quite a shock.

Ingredients:
  • 2 plums, stones removed and chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 habanero pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 2 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. molasses
  • ¼ cup brewed tea
  • 2 whole chickens, cut into 8 pieces each
  • Salt and back pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Cook the onion, garlic, and habanero until softened, then add the plums and tomatoes and cook another few minutes, until they begin to break down and release their juices. Add the vinegar, molasses, and tea, and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 45 minutes. Puree in a blender until smooth, and season with salt and pepper.

  2. Set aside 2/3 cup of the sauce. Marinate the chicken pieces in the remaining sauce, and allow to rest in the refrigerator for at least an hour, if possible. Cook over a medium-hot grill - not too hot to avoid burning the sugars in the sauce - until the chicken is fully cooked through. Just before taking off of the grill, brush the chicken pieces with the reserved sauce. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Peaches make an excellent cobbler, a delicious pie, and are pretty hard to beat just eaten out of hand. But with just a few good ones, a little time, and some rich whipped cream, there's nothing quite like a Peach Upside-Down Cake.

Bonus Recipe, August 6th: Peach Upside-Down Cake

Seasonal Recipe
Peach Upside-Down Cake

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6 to 8

Pineapple upside-down cake may be an American classic; it's certainly been a popular dessert since at least the 1920s. But unless you live in Hawaii, they hardly qualify as a local fruit. Instead, why not try a peach version, to make the most of a Pennsylvania summer? Peaches also make a great substitute for mangoes in many recipes, with their tender sweetness and (sometimes) golden flesh.

Ingredients:

  • 5 peaches, preferably freestone
  • ¾ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup plus 3 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ¼ tsp. almond extract
  • 3 eggs
  • 2/3 cup almonds, finely ground (a food processor makes this easy)
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Heat 3 tbsp. butter in a 10-in. cast-iron skillet with the brown sugar until melted and smooth. Remove from the heat. Peel and halve the peaches, and place, cut side down, on the sugar.

  2. Cream the butter and sugar together until light and expanded in volume. One at a time, add the eggs, beating until smooth, then the vanilla and almond extracts. Stir in the nuts. Mix together the remaining dry ingredients in a bowl, and add to the butter mixture. Spoon the batter over the fruit and smooth the top.

  3. Bake until the center of the cake is golden and springs back when pressed, about 35 to 40 minutes. Allow to cool in the pan for a few minutes, then place a cake plate or other flat dish over the pan. Holding both tightly, flip the pan and plate over and lift the pan away. If any peaches stick, help them off with a spatula. Serve warm, if you can, with whipped cream or some good vanilla ice cream.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

News from the SVGM - July 30th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 30th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Blueberries are gone, but there's plenty of new summer fruit to be found at this week's Growers' Market! Please stop by to welcome our newest vendor, Bella's Gardens of Selinsgrove. This family-owned orchard will be at market this Friday with their own tree-ripened peaches and plums, with nectarines and more to come as the season progresses. Also be sure to pick up plenty of fresh sweet corn, locally grown without chemical pesticides or fertilizers from Dreisbach Greenhouses. All this in addition to some lovely summer squash, tomatoes, newly dug fingerling potatoes, and more from our farmers.

Turn some of that fresh sweet corn into a sweet Summer Corn Chowder with some fingerling potatoes, or consider spreading some Smashed Zucchini Dip on a piece of crusty hearth-baked bread.

We also have more music this week! KJ Wagner is back at the market again with her songs inspired by the farms and way of life here in central Pennsylvania. Stop by her website to see what she's been up to!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 30th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Eggplant
  • Sweet corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Green beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Hungarian wax peppers and banana peppers
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh herbs
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and baked goods
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh goat cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Summer Corn Chowder

Adapted from Seasons of Central Pennsylvania by Anne Quinn Corr (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000)
Serves 4 to 6

Sweet summer corn is delicious and easy to prepare in a multitude of ways. Like freshly steamed corn on the cob, with melted butter and salt, this is a quick way to appreciate corn's sweet flavor without the need for quite so many napkins.

Ingredients:
  • 3 ears sweet corn, shucked and kernels removed
  • ¼ cup onion, finely chopped
  • 2 medium potatoes, diced
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 2 cups milk
  • ½ cup cream
  • A few sprigs fresh thyme
  • Salt and back pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a saucepan over medium heat, cook the onion in butter until translucent. Add the potatoes, along with enough water to cover. Cook until tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients to the pot and bring up to a boil. Simmer another 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season to taste and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Summer squashes are arriving at the market in full force, and they're often interchangeable in recipes where the specific size and shape aren't important. Pick your favorite colors to create a colorful Smashed Zucchini Dip, which is a great way to highlight the inherent sweetness of fresh squash.

Bonus Recipe, July 30th: Smashed Zucchini Dip

Seasonal Recipe
Smashed Zucchini Dip

Adapted from The Return of the Naked Chef by Jamie Oliver (Penguin, 2000)
Serves 6+

Zucchini, along with all of its various summer squash cousins, comes on with a vigor in summer's heat. Zucchini bread, though delicious, really doesn't use up very much of it, and serves more as a way to cover it up than to appreciate its mild sweetness. This recipe, which is adaptable to whatever you have on hand, works as a dip for crackers, as a savory spread for toast, or even as a sauce for large pasta shapes. Add tomatoes, eggplant, onions, or other summer vegetables to enjoy seasonal treats at their peak.

Ingredients:

  • 6 small zucchini or summer squash, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 handful mint or basil leaves, finely chopped
  • Juice of a lemon
  • Olive oil
  • Red pepper flakes, to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place a skillet over medium heat, and cook the garlic and red pepper flakes in olive oil for a few minutes. When the garlic starts to color, add the zucchini to the pan. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash has started to break down, with a few chunks remaining. Add a splash of water, stock, or white wine if the pan looks dry.

  2. Remove the pan from the heat, and add enough additional olive oil to create a loose paste. While still warm, stir in the mint and lemon juice, and check for seasoning. Serve immediately.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

News from the SVGM - July 23rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 23rd, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Hot-weather crops are here! Look for fresh, sun-ripened tomatoes, sweet and flavorful zucchini, hot and sweet peppers, and more at this week's Growers' Market. We're also hoping to see the last of the season's blueberries, so now's the time to stock the freezer if you haven't done so already.

Hot weather calls for cool, refreshing salads, even if we're beyond the season for tender lettuces. The Farm at Stonybrook has given us a recipe for a Chilled Noodle Salad with Mango and Thai Seasoning, which would make a fine accompaniment for a tasty Thai Beef Salad.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 23rd, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Blueberries
  • Zucchini and summer squash
  • Hungarian wax peppers and banana peppers
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh herbs
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and baked goods
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh goat cheeses
  • Freshly cut flowers
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Chilled Noodle Salad with Mango and Thai Seasoning

From the Farm at Stonybrook
Serves 6

Salads aren't always about a bed of lettuce or mixed greens, and there's no reason that you can't enjoy a cool, refreshing salad on a hot summer day. Even if the July heat has done away with fresh, local lettuce until cool weather returns. Cold grains make an excellent salad, whether it's wheat berries, pasta, or, as here, Asian rice noodles. A relatively neutral background is what allows bold flavors, like the Thai Seasoning blend from the Farm at Stonybrook, to stand out even in a cold dish.

You don't have to use rice noodles if you can't find them. Other Asian noodles will work well, and even Italian pasta will do in a pinch. Likewise, try substituting banana peppers for the jalapeno if heat isn't to your taste, or fresh, local peaches for the mango.

Ingredients:
Dressing:
  • ½ cup palm sugar or light brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice
  • ¼ cup fish sauce or soy sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeno chile, finely diced
Salad:
  • 8 oz. dried rice stick noodles
  • 1 large carrot, cut into thin strips
  • 1 ½ cup thinly sliced leaf lettuce
  • 1 tbsp. Thai Seasoning
  • ½ cucumber, halved and sliced
  • 1 cup bean sprouts
  • 1 green onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 large ripe mango, peeled and sliced
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves
  • ½ cup roasted peanuts, crushed (optional)
Directions:
  1. Make the dressing. Warm all ingredients in pan over low heat until sugar dissolves, stirring occasionally. Allow to cool.

  2. Soak noodles in hot water for 15 minutes. Drain. Cook noodles in a pot of boiling water 4 ½ minutes. Add the carrot and cook 30 seconds more. Drain in a colander, and rinse under cold water to keep the noodles from clumping. Toss noodle mixture with lettuce, Thai Seasoning, and ½ cup dressing. Divide among six bowls. Top with cucumber slices, bean sprouts, and green onions. Arrange mango on top, and drizzle with remaining dressing. Garnish with cilantro and peanuts. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
The term "salad" might initially conjure up thoughts of crisp lettuce or juicy tomatoes, but there are all sorts under the umbrella, from pasta salad to chicken salad. A very different take than those, and a delicious meal all by itself, is a spicy, bright Thai Beef Salad. Take a look at our recipe or build your own from the vegetables available at this week's SVGM!

Bonus Recipe, July 23rd: Thai Beef Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Thai Beef Salad

Adapted from The Essential Thai Cookbook by Kit Chan (Hermes House, 1998)
Serves 4

Thai cuisine, like others throughout Asia, tends to use meat more sparingly than we typically do here. This makes dishes such as this a great way to stretch a relatively small quantity of good beef to feed a larger crowd. And, given that this salad is best cool or at room temperature, it's a good way to use up leftovers from a previous meal.

Ingredients:

  • 8 oz. Thai-style grilled beef (See our recipe here.) or other tender, grilled beef
  • 1 medium cucumber
  • 1 medium zucchini or yellow summer squash
  • ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2-4 small hot peppers, very thinly sliced into rings, or to taste
  • 1 cup fresh herbs, such as basil, mint, and cilantro, torn coarsely
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, very finely chopped
  • 2 limes
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Peel the cucumber, and slice both it and the zucchini into thin strips. Place in a colander, sprinkle with salt, and allow to drain for at least 30 minutes. Rinse with cold water, and allow to dry.

  2. Slice the beef as thinly as possible, into strips. Place in a bowl, along with the cucumber, zucchini, red onion, hot peppers, lemongrass, and herbs. Zest the limes over the mixture, and squeeze in their juice. Add the fish sauce, check for seasoning, and toss well. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until needed.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

News from the SVGM - July 16th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 16th, 2010

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Until just recently, the weather in our region had been so dry that our local farmers were struggling to keep their crops healthy. These past few rainstorms will certainly help the season along, but don't be surprised if this year's unusual weather makes for an unpredictable harvest of both happy and unhappy fruits and vegetables. One pleasant surprise to accompany the hot and dry is plenty of locally grown wheat from White Frost Farm. Look for both wheat berries and freshly ground whole wheat flour at this week's SVGM!

After a market hiatus, Haole Boy Salsas will be back the market this week with salsas, barbecues sauces, salad dressings and more. Salsa maker Mike Bitler will only be around from 2 to 4pm this Friday, but will be back with us again next week. Fresh flowers from Clara's Meadow and fresh blueberries will also be taking a break this Friday, but we expect both to return on the 23rd.

It's hot both inside and outside, and we're always looking for new and interesting ways to take dinner outside. This week's recipes, Grilled Salt & Vinegar Potatoes, and Grilled Beets in Rosemary Vinegar, are two suggestions from our vendors on ways to cook some delicious vegetables along with the burgers, hot dogs, or barbecued chicken.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 16th, 2010
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Potatoes
  • Multicolored beets
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Fresh herbs
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Hothouse tomatoes
  • Freshly baked artisan breads
  • Sweets and baked goods
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh goat cheeses
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Salad dressings and marinades
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Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Salt & Vinegar Potatoes

Adapted from Martha Stewart Magazine, June 2009
Serves 4

Though this recipe doesn't take place entirely on the grill, the flavor that develops from the high heat of grilling really makes it sing. Perhaps the best part is that the initial cooking can be done well ahead of time, so that the final cooking can be done just after the burgers come off.

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, or a combination
  • 1 lb. waxy potatoes, cut into ¼-inch slices
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. fennel seed, toasted and ground
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Pour the vinegar into a medium saucepan, then stack the potatoes so the vinegar covers them completely. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for about 5 minutes, or until the potatoes are barely fork tender. (You want them to hold their shape, so they don't fall apart on the grill later.) Let the potatoes cool in the vinegar for at 30 minutes. Drain well, then very gently toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper.

  2. Heat the grill to medium high. Grill the potato slices, covered if possible, until golden on one side, then flip and grill the other side - roughly 3 to 5 minutes per side. Serve immediately, sprinkled with salt or fennel to taste.
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On The Website
Beets on the grill? Why not? They're simple, tasty, and the last-minute high-heat grilling flavor is excellent with the natural sweet earthiness of the beets. Stop by the website to see our recipe for Grilled Beets in Rosemary Vinegar.

Bonus Recipe, July 16th: Grilled Beets in Rosemary Vinegar

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Beets in Rosemary Vinegar

From the Farm at Stonybrook

Beets take well to a variety of different cooking methods, from boiling or steaming, to roasting, to baking into a cake. What most have in common is a period of moist cooking, which allows the beets to cook through without becoming dry around the edges. This is no exception, using a tightly sealed package to retain the beets' moisture and the marinade's flavors, then adding an extra twist by finishing directly over the heat.

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped finely
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ tsp. Herbes de Provence
  • 3 medium beets, peeled and sliced into rounds
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a medium bowl, combine the balsamic vinegar, rosemary, garlic, and Herbes de Provence. Add the beets, and marinate for at least 20 minutes.

  2. Preheat the grill to high heat, and lightly oil the grate. Wrap the beets and their marinade tightly in a large piece of foil, and place the packet on the grill. Cook 25 minutes, or until the beets are tender. Remove the beets from the packet, and finish cooking directly on the grill grate, 2 to 5 minutes. Serve immediately.