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Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 28th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 28th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Is the summer going already? If so, that means it won't be too long before we start seeing fall's cold-weather crops appear; until then, it's time to enjoy the sweet corn, cherry tomatoes, and melons of summer.

This week, we have a recipe for Tagliatelle with Smoked Salmon, a simple pasta dish that's excellent with or without a handful of fresh, bite-size tomatoes. For a simple dish to go along with the pasta, why not try some Leek and Potato Soup?

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 28th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Watermelon
  • Apples
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Tagliatelle with Smoked Salmon

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)
Serves 2-3

It's time again to enjoy the flavor of wild-caught Alaskan salmon, and sometimes the best way to do that is to keep it simple. The Scots have been enjoying wild salmon from their native waters for centuries, and have more than a few ideas on how to put it on the table. This recipe comes from collection gathered at Scottish farmers' markets, and emphasizes the variety of dishes that can be made while eating locally.

Ingredients:
  • ½ lb. tagliatelle, or other dried pasta
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 4 ounces hot-smoked salmon, flaked into pieces
  • ¾ cup cream
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup currant tomatoes, or cherry tomatoes cut in half
  • Fresh parsley, chopped, to garnish
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the tagliatelle in plenty of salted, boiling water until al dente. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce; this will take less time than boiling water and cooking the pasta. In a skillet over medium heat, cook the onion in the olive oil until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the balsamic vinegar and cook for another minute before adding the cream. Heat gently, keeping the sauce below the boil, and cook for another 4 to 5 minutes.

  2. Add the flaked salmon and tomatoes to the cream sauce while the pasta drains. In a large bowl, toss the pasta with the sauce, and garnish with the fresh parsley. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Haggis jokes aside - and of those of us who've had it, who can really say they didn't enjoy it? - there's plenty worth exploring in Scottish cuisine. Surrounded by a wealth of wild foods, and historically too poor to import luxuries from warmer climes, there's a strong tradition in supporting local foods that's proven ahead of its time. Leek and Potato Soup is just one fine example.

Bonus Recipe, August 28th: Leek and Potato Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Leek and Potato Soup

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)

Restrained and simple, this soup can be as rustic or as elegant as you please. The only essential part of the recipe is that you use the best-quality, freshest ingredients possible, because there's little to mask the delicate flavors of the leeks and potatoes. Do be sure to wash the leeks carefully; they always seem to wrap bits of sand and soil deep inside their tender white rings.

Ingredients:

  • 4 leeks, washed, trimmed, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 medium baking potatoes, or other floury potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2-½ cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • ½ cup milk or cream
  • A pinch paprika
  • Fresh parsley, to garnish
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. When the foaming subsides, add the leeks, and cook, stirring, until softened but before they begin to take any color, about 4 minutes. Add the potato and stock and bring to a boil. Simmer until the potatoes are tender and falling apart, about 20 minutes.

  2. Allow the soup to cool, and process in a blender until smooth. This may take several batches. (If the soup is still hot, be extremely careful, as hot liquids tend to expand suddenly and forcefully when agitated. Fill less than halfway, cover the top of the blender with a towel, and hold down tightly.) Return the soup to the pan, adding the milk and paprika, and adjusting the seasoning as necessary. Reheat gently, and serve warm, garnished with a little fresh parsley.

Thursday, August 20, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 21st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 21st, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
For those who have been anxiously awaiting their return, we're expecting to see Wild For Salmon at the Growers' Market this week, with the start of this year's catch from Bristol Bay, Alaska. They won't have everything - the fillet portions won't arrive until next week - but now's the time to get thinking about it. And, if you've never tasted the difference between farmed salmon and wild-caught, then you're in for a very special treat.

Haven't felt inundated in tomatoes this year? Un-tomato-y weather has something to do with it, but it seems that the arrival of the late blight in Pennsylvania may be curtailing a great tomato harvest. You can read a little more about it via the New York Times, or in an essay from Dan Barber, a chef and vocal supporter of seasonal, local, and organic foods.

Our recipes this week include Dong'an Chicken, a Hunanese recipe for a sour, spicy, and delicious way to cook an entire chicken. Or, if you're looking for something unbelievably simple and tasty, then why not try Boiled Edamame, that regular standby of Japanese restaurants. Salty, rich, and great with a cold beer or glass of wine, they're the sort of snack that only takes minutes to prepare.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 21st, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cantaloupe
  • Edamame
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Dong'an Chicken

Adapted from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2006)

It's always preferable to have a refrigerator full of a variety of food when trying to plan dinner, but there are those days when that's hardly the case. In fact, there are all sorts of classic foods whose origins are due to desperation and a near-empty pantry. Caesar salad, Buffalo wings, and Dong'an chicken are among them. The story for this recipe goes like this: three old sisters ran a small restaurant in Dong'an county in the eighth century, during the Tang dynasty. Late one night, after they had sold out of almost everything, a group of traveling merchants arrived and demanded dinner. Without much in the kitchen, the sisters slaughtered a few chickens and threw this dish together; it was so delicious that the merchants spread the word everywhere they went. To this day, over a thousand years later, it's still considered a classic dish of Hunanese cuisine.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole chicken, about 3 lbs.
  • 1 2-inch piece of ginger, washed but unpeeled
  • 3 scallions
  • 1 fresh red chilli pepper
  • 3 dried chillis (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
  • 2 tablespoons clear rice vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon whole Sichuan pepper
  • ¾ teaspoon potato flour or cornstarch, mixed with 2 teaspoons cold water
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 4 tablespoons lard or peanut oil
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Bring 4 quarts of water to boil in a large saucepan over high heat. Add the chicken to the pot and return to the boil, skimming any foam from the surface. Crush half of the ginger and one scallion with the side of a knife, and add them to the pot. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes. Remove the chicken from the liquid, and allow it to cool; reserve the cooking liquid. The chicken should be only partially cooked at this point.

  2. When the chicken has cooled enough to handle, remove the meat and cut into bite-size strips, along the grain of the meat. If you like, return the bones and meat scraps to the cooking liquid, and continue to cook it into chicken stock for another purpose.

  3. Cut the fresh chilli in half, remove the seeds, and cut into fine slivers about and inch and a half long. Peel the remaining ginger, then cut into slices and then slivers, like the chilli. Likewise, cut the scallions into slivers of the same size.

  4. Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat, and add the lard or peanut oil. Before the oil begins to smoke, add the slivered chilli, ginger, dried chillis, and Sichuan pepper, and stir-fry until fragrant but not beginning to color or burn.

  5. Add the chicken and continue to stir-fry. Add the Shaoxing wine, vinegar, and salt to taste. Add up to half a cup of the poaching liquid, and bring it all to a boil, then reduce the heat, simmering briefly to allow the flavors to mix and for the chicken to finish cooking through.

  6. Add the potato flour mixture to the liquid, and stir as it thickens. Add the scallion slivers, then remove from the heat. Stir in the sesame oil, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Feeling a little lazy? Looking for something salty and easy to enjoy with a cold beer one August evening? Try some Boiled Edamame while they're in season. They're refreshing, with a buttery richness, and only available for a few weeks at the height of summer.

Bonus Recipe, August 21st: Boiled Edamame

Seasonal Recipe
Boiled Edamame

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)

This is one of those recipes, so simple, so easy, that it hardly needs any explanation. That doesn't mean, however, that it isn't delicious and well worth making. If you really take a shine to these, and want to enjoy them well past their fresh season, wrap them tightly in plastic and freeze them; they should keep for months. They're definitely finger food, so make sure you have plenty of cold beer and napkins handy.

To eat them, place the pods between your teeth, and the beans will pop right out into your mouth. If you prefer, you can also shell them by hand for snacking or for a last-minute addition to another recipe.

Ingredients:

  • Fresh edamame (immature soybeans in their pods)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. If you purchase your edamame still attached to their stalks, remove the pods, but leave the beans inside. Wash the pods and, if you like, scrub the fuzz off of the outside, though this isn't necessary.

  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Add the edamame and cook for 3-4 minutes, or until the beans are tender inside the pods. (Taste one to be sure.) Drain, sprinkle with more salt, and serve immediately.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 14th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 14th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Melons are arriving at the Growers' Market! The first fragrant cantaloupes appeared last week, and we're expecting to see more this week and next. Just follow your nose; the aroma of a perfectly ripe muskmelon is intoxicating and hard to miss. Also back this week is the Columbia County Bread Company, with sprouted whole-grain breads, pitas and more.

To go with some freshly-baked pitas, try making some Quick & Easy Tabbouleh, a vendor favorite. With fresh vegetables, it's substantial enough for a meal, but just as well suited for a summer evening snack. For another taste of summer, try turning some of that delicious sweet corn into Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato.

We have music this week, too: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 14th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Cantaloupe
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Plums
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Quick & Easy Tabbouleh

From White Frost Farm
Serves 4

Traditional tabbouleh calls for fistfuls of fresh herbs, chopped and mixed with cooked grains. There are times when there aren't enough fresh herbs around, though, and that's just the sort of situation that gave rise to White Frost Farm's take on the recipe. Using vegetables, wheat berries, dried herbs, and fresh pita bread from the market, it's a great dish to make ahead and enjoy as a meal when the days become busy, hot, and humid.

Ingredients:
  • 1-¼ cups wheat berries
  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed if canned
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Farm at Stony Brook Greek Seasoning, or to taste
  • ¾ cup lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • Fresh tomatoes, cut into wedges
  • Fresh cucumbers, sliced
  • Fresh lettuce
  • Fresh pita bread
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the wheat berries in boiling water until tender, about 1 hour. Drain and transfer to a bowl. Mix in the chickpeas, onion, Greek Seasoning, lemon juice, and olive oil, and taste for seasoning. Adjust as necessary.

  2. If you will be serving - and eating it all - right away, you can dice the tomatoes and cucumbers and mix them into the tabbouleh. If not, serve the vegetables alongside, which will keep them from turning mushy as they sit. Enjoy with freshly baked pitas and lettuce, either as a salad or a Greek-style sandwich.
* * * * *

On The Website
Corn on the cob: it's delicious, but messy under all but the best of circumstances. (And sometimes, that's just the way to enjoy it.) For those times when messiness just won't do, the bright, summery flavors of Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato ought to hit the spot.

Bonus Recipe, August 14th: Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato

Seasonal Recipe
Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Corn on the cob is delicious, of course, whether it's grilled or boiled, and topped with butter and salt or lime juice and dried chilli peppers. Sometimes, though, the outdoor picnic level of messiness just doesn't suit. This recipe, which also makes use of some of the other heat-loving summer vegetables, is more suited to a dinner with fork and spoon. The peppers used in this recipe have a bit of heat to them, but feel free to substitute sweet bell peppers if you prefer.

Ingredients:

  • 6 large ears of corn, kernels and scrapings removed separately
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 teaspoon ground, toasted cumin seeds
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2-3 jalapeno or serrano peppers, deseeded and diced
  • 1 large tomato, seeded and diced
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a blender, puree 1 cup of the corn kernels with 1 cup of water for 2 to 3 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh or cheesecloth, pushing out as much liquid as possible.

  2. In a mortar, pound together the garlic and cumin with a pinch or two of salt. Heat a wide skillet with the butter over medium-high heat and add the pounded garlic, onion, and peppers. Cook for about 4 minutes, or until the onions and pepper soften and begin to show some color. Stir in the remaining corn kernels and scrapings, along with the strained corn milk. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes.

  3. Just before the dish is finished, add the tomato, and allow it to warm through. Check for seasoning, stir in the cilantro, and serve immediately.

Thursday, August 6, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 7th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 7th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The weather may be hot and humid, but that only means that there are more of summer's heat-loving produce ready at this week's Growers' Market. Rain or shine, we'll be there!

Our newsletter recipe this week comes from The Inn To The Seasons, a Stuffed French Toast that's outright decadent. Topped with some fresh, seasonal fruit, it might well be better than any breakfast ought to be. We also have something more savory on the website, Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers, a simple stir-fry of pork and vegetables that's easy to make any night of the week. Try it with the season's first edamame, appearing at the market this week!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 7th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Fresh edamame
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Stuffed French Toast

From The Inn To The Seasons

This week's recipe comes to us from The Inn To The Seasons, whose freshly baked breads and goat's milk ricotta make for an exceptional Sunday brunch. Thick slices of rich challah, filled with sweetened ricotta, are a real treat. The only trick, of course, is to make sure enough bread lasts until brunch time.

Ingredients:
  • 1 loaf challah bread
  • 8 oz. goat's milk ricotta
  • ¼ cup sugar, honey, or maple syrup, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, or to taste
  • Pinch of salt, or to taste
  • 1 cup milk or cream
  • 3 eggs
  • Butter or margarine, as needed
  • Fresh fruit
Directions:
  1. In a bowl, mix together the ricotta, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Taste for seasoning and adjust as needed. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk and eggs.

  2. Slice the bread about 1 inch thick. Cut into one edge of the slices, creating a pocket within the slice. Open the pocket with your fingers, and spoon the cheese mixture inside. Soak the filled slices in the egg mixture, one or two at a time if necessary, until they are saturated but not falling apart.

  3. Melt a small amount of butter on a griddle over medium heat. Cook as many slices as will fit without crowding, until the underside is golden brown. Flip and cook until the other side is also brown, adding more butter as needed. Serve immediately, or keep the French toast warm in a 200°F oven while subsequent batches cook. Serve with fresh fruit in season.
* * * * *

On The Website
Chinese food can sometimes be daunting, complicated, and full of spices and unusual ingredients. It doesn't need to be, though. A simple peasant dish, such as Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers, is authentic, delicious, and the sort of meal that you can whip up at home in the time it takes to cook up a batch of rice.

Bonus Recipe, August 7th: Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers

Seasonal Recipe
Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers

Adapted from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2006)

Chinese food can be many things; after all, it's an enormous country with a wide variety of cultures and traditions. This recipe comes from Hunan province, and is the sort of everyday dish eaten all over. Like so many dishes that everyone seems to know, there are almost as many versions as there are cooks; it's also the sort of dish that rarely appears in recipe books, because everyone in Hunan already knows how to make it!

Ingredients:

  • 2 or 3 green bell peppers, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 oz. pork belly or thickly sliced bacon
  • 8 oz. lean pork
  • 1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine (or medium-dry sherry)
  • 1 teaspoon light soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons fermented black beans, rinsed
  • About 3 tablespoons lard or peanut oil, for cooking
  • ½ teaspoon potato flour or cornstarch, mixed with 2 tablespoons water (optional)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the pork belly and lean pork into thin slices. Set the pork belly aside. Mix the lean pork with the Shaoxing wine and soy sauces, and allow to rest.

  2. Place a wok or large skillet over medium heat, and add a little lard or peanut oil. Stir-fry the peppers, occasionally pressing them against the side of the wok, until they are tender and the skins puckered, about 5 minutes. Remove the peppers from the wok.

  3. Raise the heat to high, and add 2 tablespoons of oil. Cook the pork belly until the slices are starting to turn golden. Add the garlic and black beans, stir-frying until they become fragrant, then add the lean pork. When the pork is almost fully cooked, return the peppers to the wok and stir-fry another minute to heat through.

  4. If you would like a thick, glossy sauce, add the potato flour mixture to the wok at the last minute, stirring just until everything is coated. Serve immediately.