.

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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 31st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 31st, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is nearly here, and the hot, summery weather certainly seems to be arriving with it. And with all of that hot weather, you can expect to find some great summer produce this week, from fresh sweet corn to tomatoes to green bell peppers. This week also marks the return of fresh whole wheat flour from White Frost Farm.

We also have a new vendor to add to our market this week: Columbia County Breads. Our customers in the Lewisburg area may be familiar with Doug Michael's breads from the Natural Food & Garden store; we can now expect to find those breads a regular part of the Growers' Market. Please note: Columbia County Breads will be attending the market every other week.

This week's recipes include Mexican Squash Blossom Sauce, which turns the orange-yellow flowers into a delicately flavored sauce, just perfect for a simply cooked chicken. Or, if you're in the mood for trying some locally-grown whole wheat flour, why not have some Whole Wheat Pancakes for a Sunday brunch?

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 31st, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Whole Wheat Flour
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Peaches
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Mexican Squash Blossom Sauce

Adapted from A Cook's Tour of Mexico by Nancy Zaslavsky (St. Martin's Griffin, 1997)
Serves 4

Squash blossoms are the male flowers of the various types of squash plants. They're helpful for pollination, and if harvested quickly, they're edible, too. They're delicious filled with cheese, then breaded and lightly fried, but be aware that their delicate flavor is easily overwhelmed. This recipe, a specialty of the region surrounding Mexico City, turns the brightly colored flowers into a sauce for chicken or vegetable dishes. Pumpkin flowers tend to give a stronger color than zucchini blossoms, but any of them will make for an impressive display.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. squash blossoms, about 25
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 medium white onion, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup crema, crème fraîche, or sour cream
  • ¼ cup water, plus more as needed
  • Salt and fresh white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Wash and drain the blossoms. Remove the stems and the small, spiky, cuplike section that connects the stem and blossom. Set aside.

  2. In a skillet over medium heat, saute the garlic and onion in the oil until they begin to color. Add the stock and continue to cook for 2 minutes, then remove from the heat. Allow to rest for at least 3 minutes, so that the heat of the pan doesn't curdle the crema. Add the crema and stir to combine.

  3. In a blender, place a handful of the blossoms with ½ cup of the sauce. Puree until smooth. Add more blossoms, with ¼ cup water (or as needed) and continue to blend until all of the blossoms have been pureed. Add the puree to the cream sauce, check for seasoning, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Locally grown whole wheat flour is back, and there are plenty of ways to show off its rich, nutty taste. Whole Wheat Pancakes are a great first experiment, and they go well with everything from real maple syrup to market-fresh fruit.

Bonus Recipe, July 31st: Whole Wheat Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Pancakes

Adapted from I'm Just Here For More Food by Alton Brown (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2004)
Makes a dozen 4-inch pancakes

Many "whole wheat" recipes, especially breads, call for at least some white flour, too, because of the difficulty of developing gluten with whole-grain flours. Pancakes, with their soft texture, are at their best without any gluten, and using all whole wheat helps. It also makes for much more flavorful pancakes.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk, room temperature
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Directions:
  1. Heat a griddle to 350°F, or place over medium-low heat. In a bowl, combine the dry ingredients - the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar - and whisk to combine. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, and butter. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix until it just comes together; do not mix until smooth, but be sure not to leave any pockets of dry flour. Give the batter a few minutes to rest.

  2. Wipe the griddle with a bit of butter. Scoop about a quarter cup of batter onto the griddle for each pancake. Cook until bubbles begin to form and the bottom is golden, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes, or until the other side is golden, too. Serve immediately.

  3. If not serving right away, keep the pancakes warm, layered inside the folds of a kitchen towel. Any leftover pancakes can be frozen in zip-top bags, separated by sheets of waxed paper, for up to a month. To reheat, brush with butter and place in a 350°F for 10 minutes, or simply pop them in the toaster.

Thursday, July 23, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 24th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 24th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Tomatoes, zucchini, and green beans: the vegetables of summer are arriving at the Growers' Market, with more to find every week. There are more prepared foods, too. The Inn to the Seasons has their own bacon and kielbasa to accompany their handmade pierogi and manicotti, and Haole Boy Salsas has a brand-new "Perfect Passion" salsa, a mild, onion- and cilantro-free version that's well worth checking out!

When taking home your vegetables this week, why not try something like Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise to give them a flavorful kick? Or, on our website, look for a Beet Pancakes recipe, which lets you cook up fresh beets much faster than boiling, steaming, or roasting.

In case you missed it this week, our own White Frost Farm appeared in the Daily Item. They're growing local, organic wheat, and we're hoping to see some at market this season!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 24th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads, pies, and other sweets
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Fresh green beans - or yellow wax beans, purple beans, or multicolored heirloom snap beans - are excellent when fresh and simply prepared. The addition of a simple sauce, like a garlicky mayonnaise, and some fresh herbs, elevates them to something special. For the best version of this you can have, try making your own Homemade Mayonnaise, a sauce that's better than any store-bought version available.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. green, yellow, or purple beans
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. To prepare the garlic mayonnaise, chop the garlic coarsely and grind to a smooth paste in a mortar and pestle with a pinch of salt. If you don't have a mortar, chop finely with the salt on a cutting board. Mix with the mayonnaise in a small bowl.

  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Trim the beans and boil, uncovered, until they are bright green and still have a bit of resistance to the bite, about 3 to 4 minutes. Drain the beans.

  3. While still warm, toss the beans with the mayonnaise; the heat of the beans will thin it to a saucelike consistency. Add the parsley, toss again, and check the seasoning. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Beets are delicious, but always seem to take so long to cook. On top of that, a bunch of beets that are all different sizes will cook at different rates, too. To get past both of those problems, try making Beet Pancakes, a variation on potato pancakes that's quick and easy to prepare.

Bonus Recipe, July 24th: Beet Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Beet Pancakes

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Beets, whether they're red, golden, or striped, are a treat at the market any time of the season. Brightly colored, distinctly flavored, and undeniably sweet, they're unlike anything else. They may not be for everyone, but prepared like this, and topped with fresh sour cream, you might just win a few converts.

Ingredients:

  • About 1 lb. beets
  • ½ onion
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • About 1 cup flour
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • Milk, as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil, plus more for the pan
Directions:
  1. Grate the beets and onion by hand, or by using the grating disk of a food processor. Add to a bowl with the thyme, egg, and flour, and season with salt and pepper. Add enough milk to the mixture so that it drops easily from a spoon, then stir in the melted butter or olive oil.

  2. Place a large skillet or griddle over medium heat. Add a little butter or olive oil to prevent sticking, and drop spoonfuls of the batter on to cook, smoothing them to an even layer as needed. Cook, turning once, until both sides are nicely browned, about 15 minutes total. If you need to work in batches, you can keep the pancakes warm in a low oven. Serve warm or at room temperature, with plenty of sour cream.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 17th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 17th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The summer thunderstorms may be here, and the Growers' Market will be here, rain or shine. It seems we've had so much cool weather lately that it's hard to believe we're more than halfway through July. Chilly mornings call for a warm cup of herbal tea from the Farm at Stony Brook; a cool Sunday evening calls for a meal like Chicken and Dumplings. And, for dessert, why not try Cherries with Fresh Ricotta? Scroll down for the recipe!

Sweet Sally's Soaps will be taking a week off from the market, but will return next Friday with handmade soaps and bath accessories.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 17th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Tomatoes
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Cherries
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads, pies, and other sweets
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Cherries with Fresh Ricotta

Adapted from The Best Places: Northwest Desserts Cookbook by Cynthia C. Nims (Sasquatch Books, 2004)
Serves 8

This recipe comes from Portland, Oregon's Wildwood Restaurant, which makes great use of its own local farmers' market to create its menu. Served in individual tartlet shells at the restaurant, it's just as delicious - and certainly simpler - without. For a more elegant presentation, try arranging the ricotta and cherries in a pre-baked tart shell. See our website recipe for a Short Tart Crust for one to try.

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups sweet cherries, pitted and halved
  • ¼ cup kirsch or other brandy
  • 1-½ cups fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons honey or sugar
  • ½ vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped out, or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • ½ cup shaved or grated bittersweet chocolate
Directions:
  1. Combine the cherries and kirsch in a bowl, tossing gently to mix. Allow to rest while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. If possible, refrigerate overnight. Drain the cherries before using.

  2. Stir together the ricotta, honey, and vanilla beans seeds or extract until well blended. Add the cream and stir until smooth. Spoon into individual serving bowls, and arrange the drained cherries on top, cut side down. Garnish with the almonds and chocolate, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Unusually cool weather might be less than ideal for this year's high-summer vegetables, the tomatoes and peppers and sweet corn, but it's as good an excuse as any for enjoying comforting dishes like Chicken and Dumplings. Simmering on the stove, it's one of those weekend meals that fills the house with a wonderful aroma.

Bonus Recipe, July 17th: Chicken and Dumplings

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken and Dumplings

Adapted from Chicken for Dinner by Heidi Haughy Cusick (Oxmoor House, 1998)
Serves 4-6

What could be a more traditional American Sunday dinner than chicken and dumplings? Delicious, comforting food, it's even easier than a roast chicken. Vary the vegetables according to the season, and you have a dish to feed a family any month of the year.

Ingredients:

  • 1 chicken, about 4 lb.
  • 2 carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • A few sprigs fresh thyme
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
For the dumplings:
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1-½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup milk
Directions:
  1. Place the chicken in a large pot, breast side up. Add the carrots, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaf, thyme, salt and pepper. Pour in water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the chicken is cooked through, about 50 minutes.

  2. While the chicken cooks, prepare the dumpling dough. In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Using your fingertips or a pastry cutter, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the parsley. With a wooden spoon, stir in the milk until a firm dough forms. Pinch off pieces of dough and roll into balls; you should have enough for 8 to 10 dumplings.

  3. When the chicken is ready, remove from the broth to a cutting board. Raise the heat to medium-high, and skim off any foam that forms as the broth comes to a boil. Use a slotted spoon to lower the dumplings into the broth, then cover and cook until they are puffed and set, about 10 to 15 minutes.

  4. While the dumplings are cooking, carve the chicken into individual serving pieces, and transfer to bowls. Include a dumpling or two, along with some of the vegetables, and ladle the broth over everything. Serve immediately.

Thursday, July 9, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 10th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 10th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
You can expect to find plenty of fresh, ripe blueberries this week at the Growers' Market, along with all sorts of other exciting and fresh foods. If you're not sure what to do with all of those fresh berries, why not enjoy them in a freshly made Blueberry Smoothie? It's a refreshing summer drink to take the edge off of a hot day. This week, we also have a recipe for Steak Diane, for those who'd rather cook up a steak indoors and avoid the mosquitoes.

We have music this week, too: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 10th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Broccoli
  • Green beans
  • New potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Cherries
  • Snap peas
  • Shelling peas
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Salad greens
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Collard greens
  • Spring onions
  • Shallots
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Freshly baked breads and muffins
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Blueberry Smoothie

Serves 4

The real trick to making a delicious, intensely flavored smoothie is to freeze your fruit ahead of time. Doing so eliminates the need for ice, which only waters down the finished product. Blueberries, in particular, freeze exceptionally well; simply toss them in a heavy-duty resealable bag in the freezer, and remove them for smoothies, pancakes, or anything else you might like all year round.

Ingredients:
  • 3 to 4 cups frozen blueberries
  • 1 to 1-½ cups milk, or as needed
  • ½ cup vanilla ice cream (optional)
  • Simple syrup, to taste (See Note below.)
  • A pinch of salt
Directions:
  1. In a blender, add the blueberries and milk. For a thicker smoothie, the sort that requires a spoon, add just enough milk to come to the top of the blueberries. For a more drinkable smoothie, add milk well above the blueberry line. Process for a minute, until the blueberries are pureed.

  2. Add the remaining ingredients, and process until smooth. Taste and adjust as necessary. Serve immediately.

Note: Simple syrup is just that. Bring equal parts water and sugar just to a boil in a saucepan, and allow to cool. Unlike granulated sugar, simple syrup dissolves immediately even in cold drinks. Use it sparingly, though; a little bit goes a long way.

* * * * *

On The Website
A good steak tastes wonderful just off the grill, but made with a richly flavored pan sauce, like that for Steak Diane, it can be even better. With fresh shallots, fresh herbs, and lots of flavor, it's a stunning dish.

Bonus Recipe, July 10th: Steak Diane

Seasonal Recipe
Steak Diane

Adapted from The Joy Of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4

Steak Diane is a type of sauteed steak, a method popular in Italy and France for achieving a steak with a deliciously browned exterior and the opportunity for creating a pan sauce. Pan sauces can be as simple as reducing a bit of red wine in the pan, but this classic recipe, which combines a variety of bold flavors, is hard to top. In addition to tasting great with steaks, it's also a fine addition to a nice cut of pork.

The best choices for a sauteed steak are tender, lean cuts, such as top loin, tenderloin, top sirloin, or strip. Or, better yet, ask your favorite beef farmer how he likes it.

Ingredients:

  • 4 boneless beef steaks, 6-8 oz. each
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons butter, softened
  • ½ cup chopped shallots
  • ¼ cup beef stock
  • ¼ cup brandy
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chives
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Season the steaks on both sides with salt and pepper. In a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil. Saute the steaks in the pan for about 4 to 5 minutes per side, until nicely browned and done to your liking. Be sure to remove the steaks from the pan when just slightly less done than you like, because they will continue to cook a bit as they sit.

  2. Remove the skillet from the heat, and pour off the fat. Return the pan to the heat and add 2 tablespoons of the butter. As soon as the butter finishes foaming, add the shallots and cook, stirring until softened, about 2 minutes.

  3. Stir in the beef stock, brandy, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, and salt and pepper to season. Bring to a boil for a minute or two, using a wooden spoon to scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add any accumulated juices from the steaks, too. Remove the pan from the heat, and add the remaining butter, swirling the pan until it melts. Garnish with the fresh herbs, pour the sauce over the steaks, and serve immediately.

Thursday, July 2, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 3rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 3rd, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
This Saturday is the 4th of July, and if the weather forecast holds out, it's looking to be a fine weekend for relaxing outdoors. Stop by the Growers' Market to load up on delicious goodies for your Independence Day cookout, from fresh vegetables to grill-ready meats. To get you going, we're including two recipes this week, for a Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Fruit Salsa, and for Swiss Chard with Spring Onions and Herbs. There is, as every week, plenty to find at the market, so stop on by!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 3rd, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Raspberries
  • Broccoli
  • New potatoes
  • Red beets
  • Cherries
  • Snap peas
  • Shelling peas
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Salad greens
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Spring onions
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Freshly baked shortbread and other baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Fruit Salsa

Adapted from The Joy Of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4

Grilling can be quite simple, and some of the best grilled foods are those that are treated simply. Given the variable nature of grill heat, especially over charcoal, however, it pays to take a few precautionary steps to ensure that everything turns out delicious. This recipe is straightforward, using a basic brine to provide a buffer against accidentally overcooking the pork tenderloin, a mild, lean cut that can skip from tender to overdone in the blink of an eye.

Ingredients:
  • 2 pork tenderloins
  • 1 tablespoon olive or vegetable oil
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1 cup (112g) kosher salt
  • ¼ cup (63g) brown sugar
  • Several cloves of garlic, lightly crushed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • A dozen whole black peppercorns
  • Cherry-mango salsa (or another favorite) from Haole Boy Salsas
Directions:
  1. To prepare the brine, place the water, salt, sugar, garlic, bay leaves, and peppercorns in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally to make sure that the sugar and salt dissolve completely. Once the liquid comes to a boil, shut off the heat, and allow to cool to room temperature. Chill in the refrigerator until ready to use.

  2. Place the pork tenderloins in a heavy-duty, resealable bag, and add the brine to cover, including the garlic, herbs, and spices. Any extra brine that has not come in contact with raw meat can be reserved for future use. Allow the pork to absorb the brine for about 3 to 4 hours; the longer it sits in the brine, the more heavily seasoned (and salty) it will become. If you're uncertain, err on the side of less. Brining meats should be kept in the refrigerator.

  3. Remove the pork from the brine and allow to rest, uncovered, in the refrigerator while you prepare the grill, or up to a full day.

  4. Prepare a medium-hot charcoal fire. Pat the tenderloins dry, and rub lightly with the olive oil. Grill over direct heat for about 8 to 10 minutes per side, turning once. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of the meat should read 150°F; keep in mind that the temperature will continue to rise by several degrees once off the heat. Tent loosely with aluminum foil for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.

  5. While the meat is resting, place the salsa in a small saucepan over low heat to warm through. Before serving, slice the tenderloins into round medallions, and overlap them on a serving platter. Spoon the fruit salsa over the top, andserve immediately.
Note: When preparing a brine, you can speed up the cooling by dissolving the salt and sugar in half the required amount of water, then adding the rest as cold water.

* * * * *

On The Website
Fresh greens can be such a seasonal treat, with the most tender lettuces and other salad greens thriving in the cool spring and languishing in the summer heat, or the hearty kales and cooking greens waiting for the fall frosts to come into their true sweetness. Swiss chard, however, doesn't seem fazed by much at all, and has a habit of appearing at the market throughout almost the entire growing season. If you haven't had the chance to try it yet, then this week's recipe for Swiss Chard with Spring Onions and Herbs is a great place to start.

Bonus Recipe, July 3rd: Swiss Chard with Spring Onions and Herbs

Seasonal Recipe
Swiss Chard with Spring Onions and Herbs

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4

Many recipes for Swiss chard can be adapted to use whatever other hearty greens are available, including beet greens, spinach, and kale, and this is no exception. Sometimes, though, you can find a "rainbow" style of chard, with a bunch of greens showing off red, orange, yellow, white, and green stems. Carefully cooked, they'll keep that color when they reach the table.

Ingredients:

  • 2 bunches Swiss chard or other greens
  • 2-½ tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 bunches spring onions
  • 3 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons dill, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Separate the stems from the leafy greens of the chard. Chop the greens coarsely, and the stems into ½-inch lengths. Cut the spring onions into ¼-inch slices, including at least an inch or two of the green stem.

  2. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the chard stems and the onions, cooking until the stems begin to soften, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the greens and herbs, stirring until the chard is wilted and tender, another few minutes. Serve immediately.