.

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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

News from the SVGM - June 26th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 26th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Summer is truly here at the Growers' Market, with new and exciting foods appearing every week. Red raspberries should be here this week, along with freshly dug new potatoes and broccoli. For a simple, but delicious idea, try some New Potatoes with Lemon. Or stop by the website for a simple Raspberry Vinegar recipe, just one way to preserve that fresh raspberry flavor well beyond the short season of ripe, delicious berries.

We have two new vendors starting up at the Growers' Market this week. Emma Yoder will be coming with a selection of homemade breads and other baked goods, and the Inn To The Seasons will be coming with their own goat cheeses and a variety of prepared foods. Come and see what they have to offer!

Our very own Mike Bitler, of Haole Boy Salsas, is featured in the current issue of Inside Pennsylvania magazine. The article is only available in print, but you can stop by the website for a picture of the salsa man in action.

There's more music this week! KJ Wagner is back at the market again with her songs inspired by the farms and way of life here in central Pennsylvania. Stop by her website to see some news and videos of KJ performing.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 26th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Raspberries
  • Broccoli
  • New potatoes
  • Red beets
  • Mulberries
  • Snap peas
  • Shelling peas
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Salad greens
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Spring onions
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Freshly baked shortbread and other baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
New Potatoes with Lemon

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)
Serves 4

Freshly dug, before they've grown to full size, new potatoes are a short-season treat. Smaller than the potatoes they might have grown to become, they're more tender, with more delicate skins, than the full-size potatoes we'll see later in the season. This recipe is a take on some Spanish tapas, a way to turn some simple potatoes into a delicious accompaniment to a glass of wine.

Ingredients:
  • 1-½ lb. new potatoes
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Fresh parsley, finely chopped, for garnish
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. In a food processor, process the garlic scapes with lemon juice, salt and pepper until finely chopped. Add the beans and process to a rough purée.

  2. Clean the potatoes thoroughly, but there is no need to peel them. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil, and cook the potatoes until just tender when pierced with a knife. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a small skillet. Add the lemon juice and heat just enough to warm through; do not bring to a boil.

  3. Drain the potatoes, and remove to a serving bowl. Pour over the butter and lemon juice, then sprinkle with the parsley, lemon zest, salt, and pepper. Check for seasoning and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Now that local raspberries are here, it's time to enjoy them while you can. Unfortunately, with their very limited shelf life, the joys of raspberries won't last long. One of the easiest ways to extend the season is to infuse some Raspberry Vinegar, which lets you enjoy the color and aroma of this summer fruit year-round.

Bonus Recipe, June 26th: Raspberry Vinegar

Seasonal Recipe
Raspberry Vinegar

Adapted from Preserving Food: Flavored Vinegars by the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service
Makes about 3 cups

Jams and jellies are perhaps the most common sort of home preservation, but homemade vinegars are even easier to make, with smaller quantities, if you like. Raspberry vinegar lets you enjoy the flavor of local raspberries throughout the year. Use it in salad dressings, to perk up the flavors of cooked greens and other braised dishes, or with some sparkling water and a little sugar or simple syrup to taste for a refreshing summer beverage.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups fresh raspberries, gently rinsed
  • 3 cups apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, or distilled white vinegar
Directions:
  1. Bruise the raspberries lightly, using the back of a spoon or by rolling in waxed paper. Place them in the bottom of a sterilized quart glass canning jar.

  2. Heat the vinegar to just below the boiling point, 190° to 195°F. Pour over the raspberries, cap the jar tightly, and allow to stand in a cool, dark place for 2 to 3 weeks.

  3. Strain the vinegar through a damp cheesecloth or fine mesh strainer. Discard the fruit. Pour the vinegar into clean, sterilized jars or bottles, and seal tightly. The best place to store is in the refrigerator, where you can expect it to keep well for 6 months or more.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

News from the SVGM - June 19th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 19th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Tell your friends: the Growers' Market has expanded its hours to serve you better! Starting this week, the market will be open from noon until 6pm every Friday, one hour later. We're just in time for Lewisburg's Summer Solstice Party, so you can stop in for your weekly supply of fresh, local foods, and stick around for the festivities!

We're also adding a new vendor to our lineup this week: The Farm at Stony Brook, offering dried herbs, herbal blends, and teas. Stop by and welcome Lisa Padner to our market!

With more food showing up every week, we're looking out for new and interesting recipes to turn it into delicious meals. This week, with the arrival of fresh shelling peas, why not try some Simple English Peas? Or, if you've never had the pleasure of trying garlic scapes, a real seasonal treat, put them into a Garlic Scape and Bean Dip? Neither one of these spring vegetables lasts for long, so get them and enjoy them while you can.

While you're at the market, be sure to stop by to try some of the fine raw milk cheeses made by Stone Meadow Farm. Recently profiled in the Centre Daily Times, cheesemaker Brian Futhey is making some excellent cheeses, especially his fine Camembert-style Leigh Belle.

This is also the week to place orders for Cornish hens from Beaver Run Farms. They're popular little birds, so do stop by to reserve yours early.

We'll also have some music this week, weather permitting. Billy D. and Rosie will be by to serenade us with their renditions of oldies during the market hours.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 19th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Mulberries
  • Snap peas
  • Shelling peas
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Strawberries
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Asparagus
  • Radishes
  • Salad greens
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Rhubarb
  • Spring onions
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Freshly baked shortbread
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Garlic Scape and Bean Dip

Adapted from The New York Times by Melissa Clark (June 18th, 2008)
Makes about 1-½ cups

Garlic scapes are a bonus to anyone growing hardneck garlic. These curly, green shoots rise out of the top of the plant, and need to be cut off to ensure that the largest, healthiest garlic bulb grows underground. They only appear around this time of year, as the plants are maturing, and have a lovely and mild garlic flavor, quite unlike the fiercely pungent heat that the garlic will have come autumn.

This recipe is a twist on hummus, using the scapes for a smooth, garlicky flavor and a hint of green color. Later in the season, when the scapes are no longer available, consider replacing the scapes with caramelized onions or roasted garlic.

Ingredients:
  • 1/3 cup sliced garlic scapes (3 to 4)
  • 1 can (15 ounces) cannellini or other white beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, plus more to taste
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons water, as needed
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. In a food processor, process the garlic scapes with lemon juice, salt and pepper until finely chopped. Add the beans and process to a rough purée.

  2. With motor running, slowly drizzle olive oil through feed tube and process until fairly smooth. Pulse in 2 or 3 tablespoons water, or more, until mixture is the consistency of a dip. Taste and add more salt, pepper and/or lemon juice, if desired.

  3. To serve, spread out the dip on a plate, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with more salt. Garnish with finely chopped garlic scapes, if desired. Serve with slices of crusty bread, soft pitas, or even use as a flavorful sandwich spread.
* * * * *

On The Website
Now that they're available in every grocery store's freezer case, we tend to forget just how good real, fresh garden peas really are. Thomas Jefferson knew, however; he may be best remembered as a founding father and President of the United States, but he was also an avid gardener and vegetable aficionado. Read a little more about him on our website, and find a recipe for Simple English Peas, as Jefferson himself might have enjoyed these early summer treats.

Bonus Recipe, June 19th: Simple English Peas

English food writer Jane Grigson knew her food and her history. In particular, she was well familiar with America's own Thomas Jefferson, not so much for his political accomplishments as for his skill and ardor as a gardener and horticulturalist. One of the first Americans to embrace the tomato, he also loved the simple garden pea, a special, seasonal treat at a time when all foods were seasonal. Here, Grigson talks about Jefferson and his love of peas:

"I should like to go back in time to the great days of the garden pea, and invite myself to dinner with Thomas Jefferson. It would have to be when he was no longer President of the United States, and was free to enjoy the garden he had made at Monticello in Virginia. More specifically I would choose late spring for my visit, when everyone was waiting to see who would be the first to put peas on the dinner table. I have a particular occasion in mind.

"Growing the first peas was an annual competition in Jefferson's neighbourhood among his friends. It is mentioned in his Garden Book and letters, often, as peas were his favorite vegetable and he grew several varieties. The winner, almost always Mr George Divers, had the privilege of inviting others to a dinner at which the first peas were the star item. Little notes were rushed around to the circle of friends, 'Come to-night - the peas are ready'. One year Jefferson's peas were ready before he received Mr Divers' invitation. His family reminded him that he had the right to give the special dinner and urged him on to the preparations. 'No, say nothing about it,' replied Jefferson, 'it will be more agreeable to our friend to think that he never fails.' Jefferson was a lovable man, unusually so for a President of the United States. For him money was not the name of the game, or vanity. I should like to have shared that secret Jefferson family meal when they ate their first peas, keeping the news from George Divers, so as not to upset his pride."
Seasonal Recipe
Simple English Peas

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)
Serves 2 to 4

When fresh and good, peas need little accompaniment. This recipe is very simple and straightforward, and in fact the most time-consuming part is shelling the peas. Have a helper or two nearby, and this becomes a pleasant evening chore.

Ingredients:
  • 1 quart fresh peas
  • 1 small bouquet mint, plus more chopped for garnish
  • 1 or 2 tablespoons butter
  • ½ cup water, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Shell the peas. In a saucepan, add water to about ½-insh depth, and add the mint bouquet and a little salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and add the peas. Cover tightly, reduce the heat slightly, and cook until the peas are tender, about 5 minutes.

  2. Remove the bouquet and strain off any remaining liquid. Adjust the seasoning, and stir in the butter and chopped mint. Serve immediately.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

News from the SVGM - June 12th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 12th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Seasons progress, and you can see it every week at the Growers' Market. his Friday, we're expecting to find fresh snow peas, sweet and freshly picked, as well as fresh, suckled veal. It's the signs that summer is just around the corner. For recipes this week, scroll down to see one for Veal Patties with Herb and Cream Sauce, the sort of main dish that goes perfectly with green spring vegetables like peas or asparagus. On the website, we also have a recipe for Stir-Fried Peas with Sichuan Pepper Salt, a simple and spicy way to cook up the first peas of the season!

We have music this week, too: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 12th, 2009
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Snow peas
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Strawberries
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Asparagus
  • Radishes
  • Salad greens
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • Rhubarb
  • Spring onions and green garlic
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Baked goods and sweets
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Veal Patties with Herb and Cream Sauce

Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1 by Julia Child (Knopf, 2004)
Serves 6

The vegetables of spring take well to gentle flavors, and some, like fresh peas and asparagus, match exceptionally well with the delicacy of veal. This classic French recipe, fricadelles de veau à la crème, is just one example of a dish that's perfect with a light side of those perfect spring vegetables. This version is made with ground veal, but could also be adapted to use other cuts of veal, or even a tender cut of pork.

Ingredients:
For the veal patties:
  • 1 lb. ground veal
  • 2 oz. ground pork
  • ½ cup onion, finely minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 medium tomatoes, peeled, seeded, juiced, and chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, mashed
  • ½ teaspoon thyme
  • 1 cup stale bread crumbs
  • ½ cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons parsley or other fresh herbs
  • ½ cup flour
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
For the cream sauce:
  • 1 tablespoon tarragon or basil, finely chopped
  • ½ cup dry white wine or stock
  • ½ to ¾ cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Over medium heat, cook the onions in 2 tablespoons of butter until they are soft and translucent, but not brown, about 8 to 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes, thyme, and garlic, cover, and cook slowly for 5 minutes. Uncover, raise the heat, and boil rapidly until the tomato juices evaporate. Remove from the heat and place in a mixing bowl.

  2. While the tomatoes are cooking, soak the bread crumbs in the milk for 5 minutes. Pour into a strainer and squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Add the bread crumbs to the mixing bowl.

  3. Add the meats, egg, and parsley to the mixing bowl, using a wooden spoon to blend thoroughly. Cook up a small piece to check the seasoning, and adjust accordingly. Form the mixture into a dozen balls, and flatten each into a ½-inch thick patty. If not cooking immediately, these can be covered and refrigerated.

  4. Set a skillet over medium-high heat, using olive oil, butter, or a combination to cook the patties. Dredge each patty in flour before adding to the pan, and brown on both sides for 2 to 3 minutes. Pour out any excess fat. Reduce the heat, cover, and cook slowly for 15 minutes, turning the patties halfway through. Remove to a platter and keep warm.

  5. To make the sauce, add half of the tarragon or basil and the wine or stock to the degreased pan. Boil until the liquid reduces to about 3 tablespoons, scraping with a wooden spoon to get any flavorful bits from the bottom of the pan. Pour in the cream and boil it down until it begins to thicken lightly. Remove from the heat, swirl in the butter by bits, and add the remaining herbs. Pour the sauce over the patties and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Looking for something simple, but new and different? Our website has a recipe for Stir-Fried Peas with Sichuan Pepper Salt, a Chinese-inspired dish that takes less time to cook than it does to string a bowl of snap peas.

Bonus Recipe, June 12th: Stir-Fried Peas with Sichuan Pepper Salt

Seasonal Recipe
Stir-Fried Peas with Sichuan Pepper Salt

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Snow peas and sugar snaps are sweet and delicious eaten raw, from a bowl on the kitchen table or just off the vine, but briefly cooking them gives the opportunity to add new flavors to complement their fresh flavor. This recipe makes use of Sichuan peppercorns, a fragrant, floral spice that gives a pleasant numbing sensation to the lips and tongue. The extra Sichuan pepper salt from this recipe is excellent with all manner of dishes, from asparagus to eggs to corn on the cob.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. snow or sugar snap peas, strung
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1-½ tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 tablespoons Sichuan peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • ¼ cup sea salt or kosher salt
Directions:
  1. To make the Sichuan pepper salt, toast the Sichuan peppercorns, black peppercorns, and salt in a heavy skillet over medium heat until the peppercorns are fragrant and the salt begins to lose its whiteness, about 4 minutes. Allow to cool, then grind in a mortar or in a spice grinder. This should make about 1/3 cup, so store any extra in an airtight container.

  2. Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat, and add the peanut oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and stir-fry for 30 seconds, until it is fragrant. Add the peas and stir-fry until they turn bright green. Remove from the heat, add ½ to 1 teaspoon of the Sichuan pepper salt, and serve immediately.

Thursday, June 4, 2009

News from the SVGM - June 5th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 5th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Strawberries are here! They made their first appearance at the Growers' Market last week, and we expect plenty more this week as the plants keep on producing. Come and get them while they're fresh and ripe. Strawberry season is always too short, it seems, and it won't be too long before they disappear for another eleven months!

If you're looking for a simple, yet elegant, accompaniment to your strawberries, consider stopping by our website to find a recipe for Strawberries with Balsamic Reduction, an Italian favorite. They'd go beautifully as a quick dessert to follow up the equally quick and easy Spaghetti alla Carbonara, which turns the savory breakfast combination of bacon and eggs into a hearty dinner. Scroll down for the recipe.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
June 5th, 2009
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Strawberries
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Asparagus
  • Radishes
  • Salad greens
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • Rhubarb
  • Spring onions and green garlic
  • Fruit jams
  • Greenhouse tomatoes
  • Baked goods and sweets
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Hanging baskets and bedding plants
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Spaghetti alla Carbonara

Adapted from The Regional Italian Kitchen by Nina Hazelton (Castle Books, 1995)
Serves 4-6

Though the origins of this dish are somewhat murky, we do know that it hails from Rome, and probably first came from the hilly regions outside the city. Its popularity soared during and following World War II, when American servicemen stationed in Rome brought bacon and eggs. Traditional Italian versions will typically use meats such as guanciale or pancetta, the standard American adaption makes use of our beloved, smoky bacon.

Ingredients:
  • 2 lbs. spaghetti, or any long pasta such as linguine
  • 6 slices bacon, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine
  • 3 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons parsley, minced
  • 2/3 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil; you will want to have the spaghetti cooked before the sauce is finished. Cook the pasta until al dente while preparing the rest of the dish. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200°F, and place a large, deep, oven-safe serving dish inside to warm.

  2. Cook the bacon and butter over medium heat. Once the butter melts and the bacon's fat begins to render, add the onion and cook, stirring, until it is soft. Add the wine to the pan and raise the heat to high, constantly stirring, until the liquid evaporates. Remove the pan from the heat and keep warm in the oven while finishing the sauce.

  3. In the warm serving dish, beat together the eggs, parsley, cheese, salt, and pepper. Drain the pasta and turn into the serving dish, tossing to coat the noodles evenly with the egg mixture. Add the bacon and onions, tossing to combine, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Real balsamic vinegar - aceto balsamico tradizionale di Modena - is difficult to find, and always expensive. In place of that, it's possible to turn a decent, inexpensive balsamic vinegar into a good alternative, especially good for Strawberries with Balsamic Reduction. The recipe on the website tells you how.

Bonus Recipe, June 5th: Strawberries with Balsamic Reduction

Seasonal Recipe
Strawberries with Balsamic Reduction

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)

Real balsamic vinegar is a highly concentrated, long-aged vinegar made from cooked grape juice, and its high price reflects the dozen or more years it requires to make. Syrupy in consistency, it's excellent lightly drizzled over strawberries, as the Italians do for dessert.

Though it isn't quite as complex and interesting as the real stuff, it's possible to make something like it by reducing an inexpensive balsamic vinegar. The mass-produced, unaged vinegars can range in quality, so pick one that's clean-flavored; once it cooks down, both good and bad aspects will be intensified. A little bit goes a very long way, so use a light touch and store any extra in a covered container, where it will keep for a long time.

Ingredients:

  • Strawberries, hulled and cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 cup balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup red wine
  • 2-3 sprigs fresh mint
Directions:
  1. Put the balsamic vinegar in a small, nonreactive pan with the red wine and mint. Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce the heat to a bare simmer.

  2. Reduce, slowly, until ¼ cup of liquid remains, about 20 minutes. It should be thick and syrupy; it will thicken more as it cools. Remove the mint and discard it.

  3. Place the cut strawberries into individual serving bowls, and drizzle lightly with the reduction. Save the extra balsamic syrup for future salads, grilled vegetables, ripe cheeses, fresh watermelon, or even vanilla ice cream.