.

Welcome!

Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

Want to receive our newsletter?
For a regular reminder in your email inbox, sign up for our email newsletter. Just send an email to svgmarket@gmail.com.

We're on Facebook!
Look on our Facebook page for updates as we have them!

Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

News from the SVGM - October 30th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 30th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Well, this is it for the 2009 Growers' Market season! We know that next May is a long time off, so make sure to stop by our website for any updates on next year's schedule, as well as where you can find some of our vendors between now and then. Please note that updates will appear on the website, but will not go out via email until the market is ready to start up next spring.

Last recipes for the season: Buttered Turnips and Rutabagas and Toulouse-Lautrec's Pumpkin Gratin. They're all vegetables known for their ability to keep well into the cold months, so enjoy them now, or stock up and enjoy them for the winter holidays!

And we do have a little music to see us out, as Woody Wolfe drops by with his guitar for one last round of songs and good times.

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 30th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Lettuce and salad greens
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips
  • Dried beans
  • Winter squash and pumpkins
  • Apples
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Buttered Turnips and Rutabagas

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Turnips and rutabagas, both hardy root vegetables, are tasty and easy to prepare. They're even interchangeable in most recipes, as long as you give the rutabagas some extra cooking time. Here, the two go together, so you can taste the difference between the two. The white of the turnips also looks sharp contrasted with the yellow flesh of the rutabagas.

Ingredients:
  • 1-½ lbs. turnips and rutabagas, peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon parsley, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons thyme
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Boil the cubed turnips and rutabagas in salted water until tender, then drain. The turnips should take about 12 minutes, and the rutabagas about 20. You can cook them together, if you give the rutabagas a head start, or separately to make sure they both cook evenly.

  2. While the vegetables are cooking, melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a large skillet, and brown the breadcrumbs. Set them aside, and wipe any crumbs out of the skillet. When the vegetables are draining, melt the remaining butter in the skillet over medium-high heat. Add the vegetables and cook, stirring, until they start to turn golden. Add the garlic and herbs, toss, and check the seasoning. Remove to a serving dish and top with the bread crumbs. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec is best known as a prolific and brilliant painter and illustrator, though he was also a skilled cook who loved food and friends. One of those friends, Maurice Joyant, made a collection of some of the best of those recipes, of which Toulouse-Lautrec's Pumpkin Gratin is but one.

Bonus Recipe, October 30th: Toulouse-Lautrec's Pumpkin Gratin

Seasonal Recipe
Toulouse-Lautrec's Pumpkin Gratin

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)
Serves 4

Not inspired by the famous painter, but actually created by him, this is a wonderful way to prepare pumpkin that's different from the more common versions that accompany its flavors with those of the sweet spices. If you happen to find time to make this when both tomatoes and pumpkins are ripe and good, by all means use them fresh, though canned tomatoes are a fine alternative at this time of year.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. pumpkin
  • ½ lb. tomatoes, peeled and cut coarsely
  • 1 lb. onions, sliced thinly
  • ½ cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • Olive oil, for cooking
  • Salt, sugar, and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Peel the pumpkin, And cut into wedges. Remove the seeds and pith from the inside, and reserve any extra pumpkin flesh for another recipe. Cut the pumpkin wedges into ¼-inch slices, about an inch and a half square. Toss them in flour to coat, and fry them in oil over medium heat until golden, but not brown. You'll need to cook them in batches to avoid crowding. Set them aside on paper towels to drain.

  2. In a pan over medium-low heat, cook the onions in oil until soft and translucent. Add the tomatoes and raise the heat when they start releasing their juices. Break down the tomatoes with a wooden spoon, until you have a mix of onions bathed in tomato. Season well with salt, pepper, and a little sugar if necessary.

  3. Layer the pumpkin and onion-tomato mixture in a gratin dish, seasoning the pumpkin slices as you go. Finish with pumpkin as the top layer, and cover evenly with the breadcrumbs. Drizzle the melted butter over all, and bake in the oven at 350°F until bubbling at the sides, about 45 minutes. If the top needs to brown further, slide under the broiler for a few moments. Serve immediately.

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

News from the SVGM - October 23rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 23rd, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The second to last Growers' Market of the season is this Friday, so make sure to stop in before we disappear for the winter! We'll keep our website updated throughout the off season, so check in to http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/ to see what we're up to for 2010.

Autumn seems to call out for pork and apples, whether together or separate. In that spirit, we have recipes this week for Pork Loin in Milk and Apple Pancakes, to help you make good use of this fall's bounty!

Recently, market vendors White Frost Farm hosted kindergarteners from Ward L. Myers Elementary School in Muncy for the Great Potato Dig. Read all about it!

This weekend is Bucknell's Homecoming celebration, and they're having Games in the Park to coincide with the end of the Growers' Market day. Stop by to join alumni and community members in Hufnagle Park for all sorts of family-friendly games for all ages. The festivities start at 5pm, so be sure to get your shopping done early!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 23rd, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Lettuce and salad greens
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips
  • Dried beans
  • Winter squash and pumpkins
  • Apples
  • Wheat berries
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pork Loin in Milk

Adapted from The Regional Italian Kitchen by Nika Hazelton (Castle Books, 1995)
Serves 6

This simple, slow-cooking recipe comes from the Italian city of Florence. After gently simmering the meat for hours in milk, the end result is a rich and flavorful sauce, just perfect for a chilly weekend evening.

Ingredients:
  • 4 lbs. boneless pork loin
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons rosemary
  • 3 to 4 cups milk
  • ¼ lb. mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rub the pork loin all over with salt, pepper, and rosemary. Heat a casserole over medium-high heat, and melt 2 tablespoons of butter in it. Sear the pork all over, making sure it is golden brown all over. Reduce the heat to very low, and add the garlic and milk. Cover tightly and simmer for 2 hours, or until the pork is tender and the gravy thick, creamy, and golden brown. (Add a little extra milk if the gravy is too thick.)

  2. While the pork is cooking, cook the mushrooms over medium heat in the remaining butter. Cook until they release their liquid and begin to take on a bit of brown color, about 3 minutes.

  3. When the meat is ready, transfer it to a serving platter. Whisk the gravy until smooth, add the mushrooms, and pour it over the pork. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Pancakes are so easy, so delicious, and at their very best when homemade. They're quick, too; not so quick that you can make them while the coffee brews, but not far off. Blueberries may be classic, and wonderful in season, but now's the perfect time for some Saturday morning Apple Pancakes.

Bonus Recipe, October 23rd: Apple Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Apple Pancakes

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Makes 12 to 14

Fruit suits pancakes just as well as maple syrup... and there's nothing stopping your from topping these with either. If you don't have buttermilk handy, you can make these with milk; just omit the baking soda.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 1-½ cups buttermilk
  • 1 or 2 apples, peeled and very thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • A pinch salt
Directions:
  1. Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl. In another bowl, whisk together the butter, buttermilk, and vanilla. Pour the wet over the dry, and stir just enough to combine.

  2. Fold the sliced apples into the batter. Alternately, you can arrange the apple slices on top of the pancakes while the first side cooks.

  3. For each pancake, drop ¼ cup of batter onto a griddle over medium to medium-high heat. When bubbles start appearing on the surface, and the underside is golden brown, flip them over. Continue cooking until the second side is browned and the interior is set.

  4. If you can't serve the pancakes right away - perhaps because there are more to cook - you can keep the cooked ones warm in a low oven.

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

News from the SVGM - October 16th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 16th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The arrival of first frost in the region spells the ends of high summer crops at the Growers' Market this year, but that just paves the way for the best crops of fall. Lettuces and other salad greens are back, and each successive frost means that hardy crops like broccoli and kale will only grow sweeter and more delicious.

That frost-sweetened kale is ideal for a Kale Salad with Cranberries and Walnuts, or as a side dish to accompany Steamed Salmon in White Wine. Check below and on our website for recipes!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 16th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Lettuce and salad greens
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips
  • Celery
  • Dried beans
  • Winter squash and pumpkins
  • Apples
  • Wheat berries
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Kale Salad with Cranberries and Walnuts

Adapted from Love Soup by Anna Thomas (W. W. Norton, 2009)
Serves 4 to 6

This salad is best made with young, tender kale, though it's best with lacinato kale, which is delicious raw even when mature, when other kales are better suited to slow, moist cooking. Lacinato is also sometimes called Tuscan, black, or even dinosaur kale, given its dark, crinkly appearance.

Ingredients:
  • 1 large bunch tender kale, sliced into thin shreds
  • 1 bunch spicy greens, such as arugula or mizuna, chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, seeded and julienned
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/3 cup kalamata or other olives, pitted if necessary
  • ¼ lb. cheddar cheese, grated
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, walnut oil, or a combination
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Pour boiling water over the cranberries, and allow them to sit at least 15 minutes while you prepare the rest of the salad.

  2. Toss the kale, arugula, bell pepper, walnuts, and olives together in a large bowl. Mix together the oil and vinegar, and mix with the salad ingredients. Taste for seasoning; the olives may contribute enough salt that you don't need more.

  3. Drain the cranberries, and add them to the salad, along with the cheese, just before serving. The kale and greens will soften over time, but are hearty enough to stand up for a quite a while longer than a lettuce-based salad.
* * * * *

On The Website
Wild salmon has a good, strong flavor, which can be used to advantage as a counterpoint to other strong ingredients, or allowed to stand out against a more subtle background, such as in the recipe for Steamed Salmon in White Wine.

Bonus Recipe, October 16th: Steamed Salmon in White Wine

Seasonal Recipe
Steamed Salmon in White Wine

Adapted from Seasons of Central Pennsylvania by Anne Quinn Corr (Pennsylvania State university Press, 2000)
Serves 4

Salmon can be quite versatile, taking to just about any cooking method that works for fish. This recipe uses a closed container in the oven to gently steam the fillets, which helps keep them moist. It also prevents the flavors from escaping into the oven, so that all of the salmon, herb, and wine aromas are there to greet you when you open the package.

For a more elegant presentation, you can wrap each portion individually in parchment paper, so that everyone at the table can open their own when dinner is served.

Ingredients:

  • 4 salmon fillet portions, about 6 oz. each
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup fresh dill, chopped
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 lemon, thinly sliced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. In a large baking dish, place a rack to elevate the salmon above the bottom of the dish. Pour in the water and wine. Arrange the fillets on the rack. Season with salt and pepper, and scatter evenly with the herbs and lemon slices.

  2. Cover the dish tightly with aluminum foil, and slide into the oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Serve immediately, but be cautious to avoid hot steam when opening the foil.

Thursday, October 8, 2009

News from the SVGM - October 9th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 9th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Apples have been appearing at the Growers' Market for some time now, but each week seems to bring more, with newer varieties showing up, too. In case you've missed them so far, the especially delicious Honeycrisps are ripe and ready for enjoying!

In that spirit, we have a recipe for Beans with Apples and Red Wine this week, a savory dish with an edge of sweetness that's especially good with some good, hearty breads from the market. Or have your bread with some Greens and Ginger Soup, which is a delicious way to turn those bunches of leafy green goodness into a warming meal for a cold October evening.

We have music again this week: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 9th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Broccoli
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips
  • Celery
  • Dried beans
  • Winter squash and pumpkins
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Beans with Apples and Red Wine

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Aside from the combination of apples and beans, one of the things that makes this recipe distinctive is that the beans are sauteed, rather than simply stewed, which gives it a different sort of final texture. Any firm, good-flavored bean will work well here. If you're really in a rush, you can used canned beans, too, though the flavor of heirloom beans available at market really make this dish stand out.

Ingredients:
  • 3 cups cooked beans
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1-½ cups chopped or sliced apples
  • ¼ cup dry red wine
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Warm the oil or butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and apple and cook, stirring, until soft and golden, about 5 minutes.

  2. Add the thyme and red wine, and bring up to a boil. When most of the liquid has cooked off, about 2 minutes, add the beans and salt and pepper. When the beans warm through, it's ready to serve. If you like, add a little extra butter or oil to the top just before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Not sure what to do with those big bunches of chard, kale, or other greens at the market? An easy experiment to try is Greens and Ginger Soup, which balances the earthiness of good greens against the sweetness of onions and the subtle spiciness of fresh ginger.

Bonus Recipe, October 9th: Greens and Ginger Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Greens and Ginger Soup

Adapted from Love Soup by Anna Thomas (W. W. Norton, 2009)
Serves 4 to 6

Use any good cooking greens that you can get your hands on for this soup, from chard to spinach to kale. Although each will lend its own character to the final dish, they're all delicious, even mixed and matched. Be sure to enjoy this soup with some good bread, either something hearty and crusty, or full of rich, whole-grain flavor. Both complement the flavor of cooked greens quite well.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced
  • 1 large leek, chopped
  • 2 bunches spinach, chard, or other cooking greens, coarsely chopped
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2-4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 4 cups water
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat the olive oil in a pot over medium-low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until it becomes soft and golden. The lower the heat and longer it takes to cook, the richer and sweeter the flavor will be, so don't rush it.

  2. Add the water to the pot, along with the sweet potato, leek, greens, and ginger. Bring it all to a boil, the reduce the heat and simmer, covered, until everything is tender, about 30 minutes or so. Remove from the heat, and puree the soup, either with an immersion blender or in batches in a countertop blender.

  3. Return the soup to the pot, and add the lemon juice to taste, along with any other seasonings you like. Serve hot.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

News from the SVGM - October 2nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 2nd, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
October has arrived, and that means we're winding down the 2009 season for the Growers' Market, with just a few Fridays remaining. If you're looking to stock up on fresh, locally-produced food to tide you over until the market returns next spring, now's the time to start thinking about it!

As for putting some fresh vegetables to good use right away, here are two recipes that would be excellent alongside a roast chicken. A Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese is an excellent casserole that can cook in the oven in the time it takes a chicken or roast to rest before carving, and a Winter Squash and Apple Soup has a rich, sweet flavor that's so appealing when the weather starts turning cold.

We'll have a guest vendor joining the market this week. Rolf Helbig of EarthBird will be bringing a variety of handmade birdhouses and bird habitats that you can use to entice some of our native wildlife into your backyard or garden.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 2nd, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Broccoli
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Rutabagas
  • Turnips
  • Celery
  • Dried beans
  • Winter squash and pumpkins
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Cheddar and broccoli: it's a fine combination. This recipe adds cheddar to a Bechamel sauce, and includes fresh breadcrumbs to give the final dish a bit of oven-browned crunch. The trick here is to use fresh breadcrumbs, by either finely dicing up some day-old bread slices or simply sending them for a whirl in the food processor. The bread you use is up to you, whether it's a simple and airy white loaf, one filled with fresh herbs, or something rich and heavenly like challah. There are plenty to choose from at the market.

Ingredients:
  • 2 tablespoons of toasted fresh breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup fresh breadcrumbs (untoasted)
  • 2 lbs. broccoli, stems and florets cut into pieces
  • 1-¼ cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • A few drops white wine or lemon juice, as needed
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Blanch the broccoli in salted, boiling water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water.

  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. When it stops foaming, add the flour, stirring occasionally until the roux becomes fragrant, but not darkened, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the milk, and place the sauce over medium heat to bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook, without boiling, until it thickens up like a thick cream soup. Add in the cheese and stir. If it becomes stringy, add a little white wine or lemon juice, and remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper.

  3. Butter a 2-quart casserole or gratin dish, and sprinkle the bottom with the toasted breadcrumbs. Fold the cooked broccoli into the saucepan with the cheese sauce, and pour in the dish. Top with the remaining butter, cut into small pieces, and the untoasted breadcrumbs. Bake until the sauce is bubbly and it's beginning to brown up nicely, about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
With chilly weather here to stay, it seems, it certainly feels like soup season once more. A Winter Squash and Apple Soup would be a fine accompaniment to a dinner of roast chicken and broccoli gratin, but would also be delicious made with any extra chicken. Turn the bones into a rich stock, and add some of the leftover chicken to everyone's soup bowl, and it's an easy meal that's nothing like simply reheated leftovers.

Bonus Recipe, October 2nd: Winter Squash and Apple Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Winter Squash and Apple Soup

Serves 4 to 6

Squash soups are a real winter treat, with a richness and substance that can turn a bowlful of vegetables into a filling meal. This soup is excellent on its own, with some fresh bread, or topped with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream. For a more substantial version, try adding some leftover chicken or duck meat, torn into shreds, and added just before serving at the table.

This recipe calls for acorn squash, though any winter squash or eating pumpkin will do nicely. Larger squash, like butternuts, however, will leave you with more flesh than the recipe needs, so be sure to save it for another dish!

Ingredients:

  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 acorn squash, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 1 apple, peeled, cored, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil
  • ½ cup apple cider (or stock)
  • 3 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • ½ cup cream
  • ¼ teaspoon grated nutmeg, or to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a good-sized pot over medium heat, sweat the onion and carrot in the butter or oil until the onions are translucent, but not taking on color. Add the stock, apple cider, squash, apple, and nutmeg, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until all of the vegetables are tender.

  2. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. In batches, puree the soup in a blender until smooth, and return to the pot. Add the cream, and return to the stove to warm through.

  3. Serve the soup warm, with a little yogurt or sour cream, or a grating of fresh nutmeg, or even a dash of hot sauce for those so inclined.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

News from the SVGM - September 25th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 25th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Autumn has officially arrived, and the cool-weather and long-storage crops we associate with fall have been arriving at the Growers' Market. Winter squashes, sweet potatoes, apples, pears and more are ripe and ready to enjoy now. Vegetables like kale are also arriving, and getting tastier each week: try a Portuguese Kale Soup to see for yourself! Or give Sweet Potato Pancakes a shot. Sweet and savory, they're fine for breakfast, but even better with some tender, juicy pork chops.

We have more music this week: Woody Wolfe and KJ Wagner will be performing together at the Growers' Market. Come and listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 25th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Celery
  • Dried beans
  • Butternut squash
  • Apples
  • Pears - Bartletts and Asian varieties
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Portuguese Kale Soup

Serves 4 to 6

We're entering the autumn season, when the impending frosts that spell disaster for delicate plants like tomatoes and peppers mean extra sweetness for hardy brassicas like kale. They have a distinct heartiness that lets them stand up to powerful flavors, like the onions, garlic, and smoked sausage in this soup.

Ingredients:
  • ¼ lb. smoked pork sausage, diced
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 large bunch kale, cut into ribbons
  • 6 medium potatoes, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 7 cups stock or water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the sausage and red pepper flakes, and cook until the sausage is well browned; remove it with a slotted spoon and set aside. Add the onions and garlic to the pot and continue cooking until the onions are translucent, but not beginning to brown.

  2. Add the potatoes, stock, and bay leaf, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft. Remove the bay leaf and allow the soup to cool a bit. In a blender, puree half of the soup, and return it to the pot.

  3. Add the sausage and kale to the pot, and bring it back to a simmer. Cook until the kale is tender, 5 to 10 minutes, and taste to adjust seasoning. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Sweet potatoes are ready to eat, and they can be used in similar ways to potatoes when a bit of extra sweetness is welcome. For a variation on latkes, try Sweet Potato Pancakes, which make an excellent accompaniment to rich meats and spicy dishes.

Bonus Recipe, September 25th: Sweet Potato Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Sweet Potato Pancakes

Adapted from The African Kitchen by Josie Stow (Interlink, 2000)
Makes 16

Sweet potatoes can be excellent when their inherent sweetness is amplified, including brown sugar or maple syrup for a Thanksgiving side dish, for example. Left to be sweet on their own, however, makes them a much more versatile vegetable. These pancakes, which are quick and easy to prepare, can easily serve alongside grilled or roasted meats, temper the heat of spicy dishes, or, drizzled with maple syrup, make a filling breakfast with eggs and sausage.

Ingredients:

  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for frying
  • 1-¼ cups flour
  • 12 oz. sweet potatoes, peeled and coarsely grated
  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, and olive oil. Place the flour in another bowl, and pour the egg mixture over top, stirring to create a smooth batter. Add the sweet potatoes, onions, and thyme, and mix well.

  2. Heat a griddle or frying pan over medium heat. Add olive oil to the pan and when it is hot, drop dollops of the batter onto the griddle, pressing them down into shape, being sure not to crowd the pan. Fry until golden brown, flip, and repeat for the second side, about 5 minutes total. Drain on paper towels and serve immediately.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

News from the SVGM - September 18th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 18th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's another week for the Growers' Market, and maybe even one with the promise of better weather. Rain or shine, we'll be there, with plenty of produce, fresh meats, cheeses, and everything else you can find every Friday in Hufnagle Park.

This week, we have a pair of international omelet recipes: Trouchia, a chard and onion omelet from the south of France, and Tortilla Español, a Spanish potato omelet. Both are quick and simple, and make a delicious breakfast or evening snack.

This is the last week of the season to place orders for Cornish hens from Beaver Run Farms. Enjoy them while you can!

We have music this week, too: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 18th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Butternut squash
  • Apples
  • Pears - Bartletts and Asian varieties
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Trouchia

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

A sort of frittata, the real key to this recipe is to cook the vegetables and eggs slowly, which emphasizes the natural sweetness and keeps it all tender and delicious.

Ingredients:
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, quartered and sliced thinly
  • 1 bunch chard leaves, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 6 to 8 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons basil, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons thyme
  • 1 cup Gruyere or other semi-hard cheese, grated
  • 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese, grated
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a 10-inch skillet over low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until they are soft but not colored, about 15 minutes. Add the chard and continue cooking until the chard is tender and the moisture has cooked off, another 15 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, mash the garlic in a mortar with a few pinches of salt, or chop it very finely. Stir the garlic into the beaten eggs with the herbs. Combine the chard mixture with the eggs, along with the Gruyere and half of the Parmesan.

  3. WPreheat the broiler. Heat the remaining oil in the skillet over medium-high heat and add the eggs. Give a stir and keep the heat high for a minute before turning it down to low. Cook until the eggs are set, but still moist on top, about 10 minutes. Add the rest of the Parmesan and broil until the top is browned, about 5 minutes. Cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
Eggs and potatoes make an excellent breakfast, but Tortilla Español is also great with an evening glass of wine. A Spanish version of the trouchia recipe above, it's just as simple, and an amazingly great combination of ingredients.

Bonus Recipe, September 18th: Tortilla Español

Seasonal Recipe
Tortilla Español

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 6

A classic Spanish version of the frittata, this recipe takes just a scant few ingredients to produce an impressive dish. With so little to hide the flavors, it's an opportunity to truly let the quality of good, fresh, local ingredients shine.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 2 lbs. potatoes, peeled and sliced very thin
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 to 8 eggs, beaten
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Warm 5 tablespoons of olive oil in a wide nonstick or cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add the potatoes and cook, stirring, until cooked through and golden, about 20 minutes. Be sure to separate those slices that stick together. Transfer the cooked potatoes to a bowl.

  2. Add a tablespoon of oil to the pan, if needed, and saute the onions until lightly browned. Add them to the potatoes and season well with salt and pepper, then pour in the beaten eggs.

  3. Wipe out the pan with a towel, then return to the stove and add 2 tablespoons oil. Pour in the egg mixture, taknig care to smooth down any potatoes that stick up, and reduce the heat to low. Cook until the bottom is golden, about 10 minutes. Invert onto a plate, and slide back into the pan to finish cooking. Cut into slices and serve warm or at room temperature.

Thursday, September 10, 2009

News from the SVGM - September 11th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 11th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Looking for something exciting from the Growers' Market this week? With the arrival of cooler weather, you can look forward to a variety of fresh tree fruit, including apples, pears, and even some crisp, sweet, delicious Asian pears. If you've never had one before, then you're in for a very special treat.

Or try out a new Mexican spice blend from the Farm at Stony Brook to spice up some Beef & Bean Burritos. They're delicious with the salsas and hot sauces available from Haole Boy Salsas, or you can make your own Green Tomato Salsa for a different sort of twist.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 11th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Butternut squash
  • Apples
  • Pears - Bartletts and Asian varieties
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Yard-long beans
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Berry jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Beef & Bean Burritos

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1998)
Serves 6

You could, of course, make these burritos with any ground meat, from pork to turkey, or even omit it altogether for a vegetarian alternative. With salsas and hot sauces at hand, it's easy for everyone at the table to season up their dinner as spicy - or mild - as they like it.

Ingredients:
  • ¾ to 1 lb. ground beef
  • ½ cup onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon Mexican Seasoning
  • 2 cups cooked black beans
  • 2 cups cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 2 cups chopped lettuce or other greens
  • Chopped fresh cilantro, to taste
  • 6 large flour tortillas
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place the meat in a large skillet and turn the heat to medium. Stir frequently as it cooks, until it begins to lose its color. Stir in the onion and continue cooking until the lumps are broken up and any traces of pink are gone. Add the garlic, Mexican Seasoning, and chili powder and cook another minute longer.

  2. Add the beans and cook until warmed through. Taste and add salt, pepper, or other seasonings as desired.

  3. Warm the tortillas by wrapping them in foil and placing them in a 300°F oven for 10 minutes. Spread a portion of cheese on each tortilla, and top with bean-meat mixture, lettuce, cilantro, and any salsa or hot sauce. Roll up and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Looking for something to do with green tomatoes that doesn't require breading and frying? Try a Green Tomato Salsa, which makes an excellent accompaniment to the burrito recipe in this week's newsletter.

Bonus Recipe, September 11th: Green Tomato Salsa

Seasonal Recipe
Green Tomato Salsa

Adapted from How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1998)
Makes 2 cups

Salsa made from fresh, ripe tomatoes is undoubtedly one of the joys of summer. When fall arrives, however, and the threat of frost starts looming, it's worth considering one's options for using up those green, unripe fruits still hanging on the vines. Here's one recipe, which works equally well with ripe tomatillos in place of the green tomatoes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cored and finely chopped green tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • ½ teaspoon sugar, or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon garlic, minced
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Mix all of the ingredients together, taste, and adjust the seasoning. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to a week.

Thursday, September 3, 2009

News from the SVGM - September 4th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 4th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Time keeps flying by, it seems, and it's hard to believe we're at Labor Day weekend already. If you're planning an end-of-summer barbecue, then be sure to stock up on goodies from the Growers' Market! Cow-a-Hen Farm will be arriving this week with plenty of beef, including fresh, grass-fed, ground beef just right for hamburgers on the grill.

For a simple side dish, try a quick Carrot Salad with Cumin, which is easily made ahead and tastes great at room temperature. For dessert, you could pick up a butternut squash and turn it into Butternut and Apple Muffins, with the distinct flavor of autumn that's great for breakfast, too.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 4th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Butternut squash
  • Apples
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Edamame
  • Green beans
  • Yard-long beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Berry jams and jellies
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Carrot Salad with Cumin

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Unlike tender lettuce greens, raw vegetables like carrots have an assertive texture and flavor that takes well to bold dressings. Here, the recipe takes a North African influence to turn ordinary carrots into something far more interesting than plain old carrot sticks. For a really interesting presentation, look for multicolored carrots; varieties come in purple, yellow, and white in addition to the everyday orange.

Ingredients:
  • 1-½ lbs. carrots
  • Juice of 2 oranges
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin, or to taste
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Julienne the carrots, or else cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices. If you have a food processor, the julienne blade makes very quick work of this.

  2. Whisk together the remaining ingredients, and pour over the carrots, tossing to combine. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to a day. If not serving right away, allow the salad to warm to room temperature before eating.
* * * * *

On The Website
Like its cousin, the pumpkin, the butternut squash is a delicious, long-keeping vegetable. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes, and one unusual example is a recipe for Butternut and Apple Muffins, which can be made with any winter squash you happen to have at hand.

Bonus Recipe, September 4th: Butternut and Apple Muffins

Seasonal Recipe
Butternut and Apple Muffins

Adapted from The Pumpkin Cookbook by Hamlyn (Octopus Publishing, 2001)
Makes one dozen muffins

Butternut squash is a wonderful vegetable, so full of flavor and easy to cook with. And, unlike most of its winter squash and pumpkin cousins, the majority of its flesh is stored in the "neck" and away from the seeds, minimizing the amount of seed-scooping necessary to enjoy it.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup butternut squash, peeled and cut into ¼-inch dice
  • ½ cup apple, peeled and cut into ¼-inch dice
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • Pinch salt
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 5 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Sift together the flour, baking powder, spices, and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, beat together the eggs, milk, and oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix with a wooden spoon until just combined. Add the diced squash and apple, folding to incorporate them into the batter.

  2. Line a 12-cup muffin pan with paper cups, or grease the pan thoroughly. Divide the batter evenly among the paper cups, and transfer to the oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the tops are golden and the interiors have set. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 28th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 28th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Is the summer going already? If so, that means it won't be too long before we start seeing fall's cold-weather crops appear; until then, it's time to enjoy the sweet corn, cherry tomatoes, and melons of summer.

This week, we have a recipe for Tagliatelle with Smoked Salmon, a simple pasta dish that's excellent with or without a handful of fresh, bite-size tomatoes. For a simple dish to go along with the pasta, why not try some Leek and Potato Soup?

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 28th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Watermelon
  • Apples
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Tagliatelle with Smoked Salmon

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)
Serves 2-3

It's time again to enjoy the flavor of wild-caught Alaskan salmon, and sometimes the best way to do that is to keep it simple. The Scots have been enjoying wild salmon from their native waters for centuries, and have more than a few ideas on how to put it on the table. This recipe comes from collection gathered at Scottish farmers' markets, and emphasizes the variety of dishes that can be made while eating locally.

Ingredients:
  • ½ lb. tagliatelle, or other dried pasta
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 4 ounces hot-smoked salmon, flaked into pieces
  • ¾ cup cream
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup currant tomatoes, or cherry tomatoes cut in half
  • Fresh parsley, chopped, to garnish
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the tagliatelle in plenty of salted, boiling water until al dente. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce; this will take less time than boiling water and cooking the pasta. In a skillet over medium heat, cook the onion in the olive oil until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the balsamic vinegar and cook for another minute before adding the cream. Heat gently, keeping the sauce below the boil, and cook for another 4 to 5 minutes.

  2. Add the flaked salmon and tomatoes to the cream sauce while the pasta drains. In a large bowl, toss the pasta with the sauce, and garnish with the fresh parsley. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Haggis jokes aside - and of those of us who've had it, who can really say they didn't enjoy it? - there's plenty worth exploring in Scottish cuisine. Surrounded by a wealth of wild foods, and historically too poor to import luxuries from warmer climes, there's a strong tradition in supporting local foods that's proven ahead of its time. Leek and Potato Soup is just one fine example.

Bonus Recipe, August 28th: Leek and Potato Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Leek and Potato Soup

Adapted from The Scottish Farmers' Market Cookbook by Nick Paul (Angels' Share, 2004)

Restrained and simple, this soup can be as rustic or as elegant as you please. The only essential part of the recipe is that you use the best-quality, freshest ingredients possible, because there's little to mask the delicate flavors of the leeks and potatoes. Do be sure to wash the leeks carefully; they always seem to wrap bits of sand and soil deep inside their tender white rings.

Ingredients:

  • 4 leeks, washed, trimmed, and diced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 medium baking potatoes, or other floury potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2-½ cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • ½ cup milk or cream
  • A pinch paprika
  • Fresh parsley, to garnish
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. When the foaming subsides, add the leeks, and cook, stirring, until softened but before they begin to take any color, about 4 minutes. Add the potato and stock and bring to a boil. Simmer until the potatoes are tender and falling apart, about 20 minutes.

  2. Allow the soup to cool, and process in a blender until smooth. This may take several batches. (If the soup is still hot, be extremely careful, as hot liquids tend to expand suddenly and forcefully when agitated. Fill less than halfway, cover the top of the blender with a towel, and hold down tightly.) Return the soup to the pan, adding the milk and paprika, and adjusting the seasoning as necessary. Reheat gently, and serve warm, garnished with a little fresh parsley.

Thursday, August 20, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 21st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 21st, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
For those who have been anxiously awaiting their return, we're expecting to see Wild For Salmon at the Growers' Market this week, with the start of this year's catch from Bristol Bay, Alaska. They won't have everything - the fillet portions won't arrive until next week - but now's the time to get thinking about it. And, if you've never tasted the difference between farmed salmon and wild-caught, then you're in for a very special treat.

Haven't felt inundated in tomatoes this year? Un-tomato-y weather has something to do with it, but it seems that the arrival of the late blight in Pennsylvania may be curtailing a great tomato harvest. You can read a little more about it via the New York Times, or in an essay from Dan Barber, a chef and vocal supporter of seasonal, local, and organic foods.

Our recipes this week include Dong'an Chicken, a Hunanese recipe for a sour, spicy, and delicious way to cook an entire chicken. Or, if you're looking for something unbelievably simple and tasty, then why not try Boiled Edamame, that regular standby of Japanese restaurants. Salty, rich, and great with a cold beer or glass of wine, they're the sort of snack that only takes minutes to prepare.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 21st, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cantaloupe
  • Edamame
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Banana peppers
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic and elephant garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Dong'an Chicken

Adapted from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2006)

It's always preferable to have a refrigerator full of a variety of food when trying to plan dinner, but there are those days when that's hardly the case. In fact, there are all sorts of classic foods whose origins are due to desperation and a near-empty pantry. Caesar salad, Buffalo wings, and Dong'an chicken are among them. The story for this recipe goes like this: three old sisters ran a small restaurant in Dong'an county in the eighth century, during the Tang dynasty. Late one night, after they had sold out of almost everything, a group of traveling merchants arrived and demanded dinner. Without much in the kitchen, the sisters slaughtered a few chickens and threw this dish together; it was so delicious that the merchants spread the word everywhere they went. To this day, over a thousand years later, it's still considered a classic dish of Hunanese cuisine.

Ingredients:
  • 1 whole chicken, about 3 lbs.
  • 1 2-inch piece of ginger, washed but unpeeled
  • 3 scallions
  • 1 fresh red chilli pepper
  • 3 dried chillis (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine
  • 2 tablespoons clear rice vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon whole Sichuan pepper
  • ¾ teaspoon potato flour or cornstarch, mixed with 2 teaspoons cold water
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 4 tablespoons lard or peanut oil
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Bring 4 quarts of water to boil in a large saucepan over high heat. Add the chicken to the pot and return to the boil, skimming any foam from the surface. Crush half of the ginger and one scallion with the side of a knife, and add them to the pot. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook for 10 minutes. Remove the chicken from the liquid, and allow it to cool; reserve the cooking liquid. The chicken should be only partially cooked at this point.

  2. When the chicken has cooled enough to handle, remove the meat and cut into bite-size strips, along the grain of the meat. If you like, return the bones and meat scraps to the cooking liquid, and continue to cook it into chicken stock for another purpose.

  3. Cut the fresh chilli in half, remove the seeds, and cut into fine slivers about and inch and a half long. Peel the remaining ginger, then cut into slices and then slivers, like the chilli. Likewise, cut the scallions into slivers of the same size.

  4. Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat, and add the lard or peanut oil. Before the oil begins to smoke, add the slivered chilli, ginger, dried chillis, and Sichuan pepper, and stir-fry until fragrant but not beginning to color or burn.

  5. Add the chicken and continue to stir-fry. Add the Shaoxing wine, vinegar, and salt to taste. Add up to half a cup of the poaching liquid, and bring it all to a boil, then reduce the heat, simmering briefly to allow the flavors to mix and for the chicken to finish cooking through.

  6. Add the potato flour mixture to the liquid, and stir as it thickens. Add the scallion slivers, then remove from the heat. Stir in the sesame oil, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Feeling a little lazy? Looking for something salty and easy to enjoy with a cold beer one August evening? Try some Boiled Edamame while they're in season. They're refreshing, with a buttery richness, and only available for a few weeks at the height of summer.

Bonus Recipe, August 21st: Boiled Edamame

Seasonal Recipe
Boiled Edamame

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)

This is one of those recipes, so simple, so easy, that it hardly needs any explanation. That doesn't mean, however, that it isn't delicious and well worth making. If you really take a shine to these, and want to enjoy them well past their fresh season, wrap them tightly in plastic and freeze them; they should keep for months. They're definitely finger food, so make sure you have plenty of cold beer and napkins handy.

To eat them, place the pods between your teeth, and the beans will pop right out into your mouth. If you prefer, you can also shell them by hand for snacking or for a last-minute addition to another recipe.

Ingredients:

  • Fresh edamame (immature soybeans in their pods)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. If you purchase your edamame still attached to their stalks, remove the pods, but leave the beans inside. Wash the pods and, if you like, scrub the fuzz off of the outside, though this isn't necessary.

  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Add the edamame and cook for 3-4 minutes, or until the beans are tender inside the pods. (Taste one to be sure.) Drain, sprinkle with more salt, and serve immediately.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 14th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 14th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Melons are arriving at the Growers' Market! The first fragrant cantaloupes appeared last week, and we're expecting to see more this week and next. Just follow your nose; the aroma of a perfectly ripe muskmelon is intoxicating and hard to miss. Also back this week is the Columbia County Bread Company, with sprouted whole-grain breads, pitas and more.

To go with some freshly-baked pitas, try making some Quick & Easy Tabbouleh, a vendor favorite. With fresh vegetables, it's substantial enough for a meal, but just as well suited for a summer evening snack. For another taste of summer, try turning some of that delicious sweet corn into Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato.

We have music this week, too: Woody Wolfe, of Heart to Hand Ministries, will return with his guitar and good spirits. Stop on by to listen while you shop!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 14th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Cantaloupe
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Plums
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Quick & Easy Tabbouleh

From White Frost Farm
Serves 4

Traditional tabbouleh calls for fistfuls of fresh herbs, chopped and mixed with cooked grains. There are times when there aren't enough fresh herbs around, though, and that's just the sort of situation that gave rise to White Frost Farm's take on the recipe. Using vegetables, wheat berries, dried herbs, and fresh pita bread from the market, it's a great dish to make ahead and enjoy as a meal when the days become busy, hot, and humid.

Ingredients:
  • 1-¼ cups wheat berries
  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed if canned
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Farm at Stony Brook Greek Seasoning, or to taste
  • ¾ cup lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • Fresh tomatoes, cut into wedges
  • Fresh cucumbers, sliced
  • Fresh lettuce
  • Fresh pita bread
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cook the wheat berries in boiling water until tender, about 1 hour. Drain and transfer to a bowl. Mix in the chickpeas, onion, Greek Seasoning, lemon juice, and olive oil, and taste for seasoning. Adjust as necessary.

  2. If you will be serving - and eating it all - right away, you can dice the tomatoes and cucumbers and mix them into the tabbouleh. If not, serve the vegetables alongside, which will keep them from turning mushy as they sit. Enjoy with freshly baked pitas and lettuce, either as a salad or a Greek-style sandwich.
* * * * *

On The Website
Corn on the cob: it's delicious, but messy under all but the best of circumstances. (And sometimes, that's just the way to enjoy it.) For those times when messiness just won't do, the bright, summery flavors of Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato ought to hit the spot.

Bonus Recipe, August 14th: Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato

Seasonal Recipe
Corn with Cumin, Chilli, and Tomato

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Corn on the cob is delicious, of course, whether it's grilled or boiled, and topped with butter and salt or lime juice and dried chilli peppers. Sometimes, though, the outdoor picnic level of messiness just doesn't suit. This recipe, which also makes use of some of the other heat-loving summer vegetables, is more suited to a dinner with fork and spoon. The peppers used in this recipe have a bit of heat to them, but feel free to substitute sweet bell peppers if you prefer.

Ingredients:

  • 6 large ears of corn, kernels and scrapings removed separately
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 teaspoon ground, toasted cumin seeds
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2-3 jalapeno or serrano peppers, deseeded and diced
  • 1 large tomato, seeded and diced
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a blender, puree 1 cup of the corn kernels with 1 cup of water for 2 to 3 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh or cheesecloth, pushing out as much liquid as possible.

  2. In a mortar, pound together the garlic and cumin with a pinch or two of salt. Heat a wide skillet with the butter over medium-high heat and add the pounded garlic, onion, and peppers. Cook for about 4 minutes, or until the onions and pepper soften and begin to show some color. Stir in the remaining corn kernels and scrapings, along with the strained corn milk. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes.

  3. Just before the dish is finished, add the tomato, and allow it to warm through. Check for seasoning, stir in the cilantro, and serve immediately.

Thursday, August 6, 2009

News from the SVGM - August 7th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 7th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The weather may be hot and humid, but that only means that there are more of summer's heat-loving produce ready at this week's Growers' Market. Rain or shine, we'll be there!

Our newsletter recipe this week comes from The Inn To The Seasons, a Stuffed French Toast that's outright decadent. Topped with some fresh, seasonal fruit, it might well be better than any breakfast ought to be. We also have something more savory on the website, Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers, a simple stir-fry of pork and vegetables that's easy to make any night of the week. Try it with the season's first edamame, appearing at the market this week!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 7th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Fresh edamame
  • Whole wheat flour
  • Wheat berries
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads and baked goods
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Stuffed French Toast

From The Inn To The Seasons

This week's recipe comes to us from The Inn To The Seasons, whose freshly baked breads and goat's milk ricotta make for an exceptional Sunday brunch. Thick slices of rich challah, filled with sweetened ricotta, are a real treat. The only trick, of course, is to make sure enough bread lasts until brunch time.

Ingredients:
  • 1 loaf challah bread
  • 8 oz. goat's milk ricotta
  • ¼ cup sugar, honey, or maple syrup, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, or to taste
  • Pinch of salt, or to taste
  • 1 cup milk or cream
  • 3 eggs
  • Butter or margarine, as needed
  • Fresh fruit
Directions:
  1. In a bowl, mix together the ricotta, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Taste for seasoning and adjust as needed. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk and eggs.

  2. Slice the bread about 1 inch thick. Cut into one edge of the slices, creating a pocket within the slice. Open the pocket with your fingers, and spoon the cheese mixture inside. Soak the filled slices in the egg mixture, one or two at a time if necessary, until they are saturated but not falling apart.

  3. Melt a small amount of butter on a griddle over medium heat. Cook as many slices as will fit without crowding, until the underside is golden brown. Flip and cook until the other side is also brown, adding more butter as needed. Serve immediately, or keep the French toast warm in a 200°F oven while subsequent batches cook. Serve with fresh fruit in season.
* * * * *

On The Website
Chinese food can sometimes be daunting, complicated, and full of spices and unusual ingredients. It doesn't need to be, though. A simple peasant dish, such as Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers, is authentic, delicious, and the sort of meal that you can whip up at home in the time it takes to cook up a batch of rice.

Bonus Recipe, August 7th: Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers

Seasonal Recipe
Hunanese Farmhouse Pork with Green Peppers

Adapted from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2006)

Chinese food can be many things; after all, it's an enormous country with a wide variety of cultures and traditions. This recipe comes from Hunan province, and is the sort of everyday dish eaten all over. Like so many dishes that everyone seems to know, there are almost as many versions as there are cooks; it's also the sort of dish that rarely appears in recipe books, because everyone in Hunan already knows how to make it!

Ingredients:

  • 2 or 3 green bell peppers, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 oz. pork belly or thickly sliced bacon
  • 8 oz. lean pork
  • 1 teaspoon Shaoxing wine (or medium-dry sherry)
  • 1 teaspoon light soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons fermented black beans, rinsed
  • About 3 tablespoons lard or peanut oil, for cooking
  • ½ teaspoon potato flour or cornstarch, mixed with 2 tablespoons water (optional)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the pork belly and lean pork into thin slices. Set the pork belly aside. Mix the lean pork with the Shaoxing wine and soy sauces, and allow to rest.

  2. Place a wok or large skillet over medium heat, and add a little lard or peanut oil. Stir-fry the peppers, occasionally pressing them against the side of the wok, until they are tender and the skins puckered, about 5 minutes. Remove the peppers from the wok.

  3. Raise the heat to high, and add 2 tablespoons of oil. Cook the pork belly until the slices are starting to turn golden. Add the garlic and black beans, stir-frying until they become fragrant, then add the lean pork. When the pork is almost fully cooked, return the peppers to the wok and stir-fry another minute to heat through.

  4. If you would like a thick, glossy sauce, add the potato flour mixture to the wok at the last minute, stirring just until everything is coated. Serve immediately.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 31st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 31st, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
August is nearly here, and the hot, summery weather certainly seems to be arriving with it. And with all of that hot weather, you can expect to find some great summer produce this week, from fresh sweet corn to tomatoes to green bell peppers. This week also marks the return of fresh whole wheat flour from White Frost Farm.

We also have a new vendor to add to our market this week: Columbia County Breads. Our customers in the Lewisburg area may be familiar with Doug Michael's breads from the Natural Food & Garden store; we can now expect to find those breads a regular part of the Growers' Market. Please note: Columbia County Breads will be attending the market every other week.

This week's recipes include Mexican Squash Blossom Sauce, which turns the orange-yellow flowers into a delicately flavored sauce, just perfect for a simply cooked chicken. Or, if you're in the mood for trying some locally-grown whole wheat flour, why not have some Whole Wheat Pancakes for a Sunday brunch?

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 31st, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Whole Wheat Flour
  • Squash blossoms
  • Sweet corn
  • Bell peppers
  • Peaches
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked sprouted-grain breads
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Mexican Squash Blossom Sauce

Adapted from A Cook's Tour of Mexico by Nancy Zaslavsky (St. Martin's Griffin, 1997)
Serves 4

Squash blossoms are the male flowers of the various types of squash plants. They're helpful for pollination, and if harvested quickly, they're edible, too. They're delicious filled with cheese, then breaded and lightly fried, but be aware that their delicate flavor is easily overwhelmed. This recipe, a specialty of the region surrounding Mexico City, turns the brightly colored flowers into a sauce for chicken or vegetable dishes. Pumpkin flowers tend to give a stronger color than zucchini blossoms, but any of them will make for an impressive display.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. squash blossoms, about 25
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 medium white onion, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup crema, crème fraîche, or sour cream
  • ¼ cup water, plus more as needed
  • Salt and fresh white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Wash and drain the blossoms. Remove the stems and the small, spiky, cuplike section that connects the stem and blossom. Set aside.

  2. In a skillet over medium heat, saute the garlic and onion in the oil until they begin to color. Add the stock and continue to cook for 2 minutes, then remove from the heat. Allow to rest for at least 3 minutes, so that the heat of the pan doesn't curdle the crema. Add the crema and stir to combine.

  3. In a blender, place a handful of the blossoms with ½ cup of the sauce. Puree until smooth. Add more blossoms, with ¼ cup water (or as needed) and continue to blend until all of the blossoms have been pureed. Add the puree to the cream sauce, check for seasoning, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Locally grown whole wheat flour is back, and there are plenty of ways to show off its rich, nutty taste. Whole Wheat Pancakes are a great first experiment, and they go well with everything from real maple syrup to market-fresh fruit.

Bonus Recipe, July 31st: Whole Wheat Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Pancakes

Adapted from I'm Just Here For More Food by Alton Brown (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2004)
Makes a dozen 4-inch pancakes

Many "whole wheat" recipes, especially breads, call for at least some white flour, too, because of the difficulty of developing gluten with whole-grain flours. Pancakes, with their soft texture, are at their best without any gluten, and using all whole wheat helps. It also makes for much more flavorful pancakes.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk, room temperature
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Directions:
  1. Heat a griddle to 350°F, or place over medium-low heat. In a bowl, combine the dry ingredients - the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar - and whisk to combine. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, and butter. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix until it just comes together; do not mix until smooth, but be sure not to leave any pockets of dry flour. Give the batter a few minutes to rest.

  2. Wipe the griddle with a bit of butter. Scoop about a quarter cup of batter onto the griddle for each pancake. Cook until bubbles begin to form and the bottom is golden, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes, or until the other side is golden, too. Serve immediately.

  3. If not serving right away, keep the pancakes warm, layered inside the folds of a kitchen towel. Any leftover pancakes can be frozen in zip-top bags, separated by sheets of waxed paper, for up to a month. To reheat, brush with butter and place in a 350°F for 10 minutes, or simply pop them in the toaster.

Thursday, July 23, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 24th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 24th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Tomatoes, zucchini, and green beans: the vegetables of summer are arriving at the Growers' Market, with more to find every week. There are more prepared foods, too. The Inn to the Seasons has their own bacon and kielbasa to accompany their handmade pierogi and manicotti, and Haole Boy Salsas has a brand-new "Perfect Passion" salsa, a mild, onion- and cilantro-free version that's well worth checking out!

When taking home your vegetables this week, why not try something like Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise to give them a flavorful kick? Or, on our website, look for a Beet Pancakes recipe, which lets you cook up fresh beets much faster than boiling, steaming, or roasting.

In case you missed it this week, our own White Frost Farm appeared in the Daily Item. They're growing local, organic wheat, and we're hoping to see some at market this season!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 24th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green, yellow, and purple beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads, pies, and other sweets
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Green Beans with Garlic Mayonnaise

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Fresh green beans - or yellow wax beans, purple beans, or multicolored heirloom snap beans - are excellent when fresh and simply prepared. The addition of a simple sauce, like a garlicky mayonnaise, and some fresh herbs, elevates them to something special. For the best version of this you can have, try making your own Homemade Mayonnaise, a sauce that's better than any store-bought version available.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. green, yellow, or purple beans
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. To prepare the garlic mayonnaise, chop the garlic coarsely and grind to a smooth paste in a mortar and pestle with a pinch of salt. If you don't have a mortar, chop finely with the salt on a cutting board. Mix with the mayonnaise in a small bowl.

  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Trim the beans and boil, uncovered, until they are bright green and still have a bit of resistance to the bite, about 3 to 4 minutes. Drain the beans.

  3. While still warm, toss the beans with the mayonnaise; the heat of the beans will thin it to a saucelike consistency. Add the parsley, toss again, and check the seasoning. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Beets are delicious, but always seem to take so long to cook. On top of that, a bunch of beets that are all different sizes will cook at different rates, too. To get past both of those problems, try making Beet Pancakes, a variation on potato pancakes that's quick and easy to prepare.

Bonus Recipe, July 24th: Beet Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Beet Pancakes

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Beets, whether they're red, golden, or striped, are a treat at the market any time of the season. Brightly colored, distinctly flavored, and undeniably sweet, they're unlike anything else. They may not be for everyone, but prepared like this, and topped with fresh sour cream, you might just win a few converts.

Ingredients:

  • About 1 lb. beets
  • ½ onion
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • About 1 cup flour
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
  • Milk, as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil, plus more for the pan
Directions:
  1. Grate the beets and onion by hand, or by using the grating disk of a food processor. Add to a bowl with the thyme, egg, and flour, and season with salt and pepper. Add enough milk to the mixture so that it drops easily from a spoon, then stir in the melted butter or olive oil.

  2. Place a large skillet or griddle over medium heat. Add a little butter or olive oil to prevent sticking, and drop spoonfuls of the batter on to cook, smoothing them to an even layer as needed. Cook, turning once, until both sides are nicely browned, about 15 minutes total. If you need to work in batches, you can keep the pancakes warm in a low oven. Serve warm or at room temperature, with plenty of sour cream.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

News from the SVGM - July 17th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 17th, 2009

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The summer thunderstorms may be here, and the Growers' Market will be here, rain or shine. It seems we've had so much cool weather lately that it's hard to believe we're more than halfway through July. Chilly mornings call for a warm cup of herbal tea from the Farm at Stony Brook; a cool Sunday evening calls for a meal like Chicken and Dumplings. And, for dessert, why not try Cherries with Fresh Ricotta? Scroll down for the recipe!

Sweet Sally's Soaps will be taking a week off from the market, but will return next Friday with handmade soaps and bath accessories.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 17th, 2009
12pm - 6pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Tomatoes
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Cherries
  • Garlic
  • Carrots
  • Green beans
  • Potatoes
  • Red, golden, and striped beets
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Radishes
  • Swiss chard and beet greens
  • Onions
  • Shallots
  • Freshly baked breads, pies, and other sweets
  • Locally-made prepared foods
  • Fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Dried herbs, blends, and teas
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Cherries with Fresh Ricotta

Adapted from The Best Places: Northwest Desserts Cookbook by Cynthia C. Nims (Sasquatch Books, 2004)
Serves 8

This recipe comes from Portland, Oregon's Wildwood Restaurant, which makes great use of its own local farmers' market to create its menu. Served in individual tartlet shells at the restaurant, it's just as delicious - and certainly simpler - without. For a more elegant presentation, try arranging the ricotta and cherries in a pre-baked tart shell. See our website recipe for a Short Tart Crust for one to try.

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups sweet cherries, pitted and halved
  • ¼ cup kirsch or other brandy
  • 1-½ cups fresh goat's milk ricotta
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons honey or sugar
  • ½ vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped out, or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • ½ cup shaved or grated bittersweet chocolate
Directions:
  1. Combine the cherries and kirsch in a bowl, tossing gently to mix. Allow to rest while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. If possible, refrigerate overnight. Drain the cherries before using.

  2. Stir together the ricotta, honey, and vanilla beans seeds or extract until well blended. Add the cream and stir until smooth. Spoon into individual serving bowls, and arrange the drained cherries on top, cut side down. Garnish with the almonds and chocolate, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Unusually cool weather might be less than ideal for this year's high-summer vegetables, the tomatoes and peppers and sweet corn, but it's as good an excuse as any for enjoying comforting dishes like Chicken and Dumplings. Simmering on the stove, it's one of those weekend meals that fills the house with a wonderful aroma.