.

Welcome!

Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

Want to receive our newsletter?
For a regular reminder in your email inbox, sign up for our email newsletter. Just send an email to svgmarket@gmail.com.

We're on Facebook!
Look on our Facebook page for updates as we have them!

Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, October 30, 2008

News from the SVGM - October 31st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 31st, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Well, it looks like this is the end of another great market season. This Friday, October 31st, marks the end of the 2008 Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market, so be sure to stop in one last time to stock up on good, locally-produced food to last you until we're back next spring! Stop by our website for information about who and what to expect; we'll post details about vendors, times, and our location as we confirm them.

Until then, we have a few more recipes for the last of the 2008 market's wonderful food. Scroll down for a Veal Stew with Paprika, and stop by our website for Carrot-Potato Pancakes and Kürbisbrei mit Äpfeln (Pumpkin and Apple). You'll hear from us again once we start to shake off another winter, as we're gearing up for an exciting fifth year in 2009!

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, October 31st, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cabbages
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Turnips
  • Radishes
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Veal Stew with Paprika

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

We tend to think of veal as a mild and tender meat, but there are quite a number of cuts that benefit from long, slow cooking, too. After all, a cow isn't just steaks. This recipe is a variation on the better-known Chicken Paprikash, a Hungarian stew rich with sour cream and paprika. If you like heat, use hot paprika, but it's still intensely flavorful when made with the sweet variety.

Ingredients:
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil or butter
  • 2 lbs. veal stew meat, cut into 1-1/2 inch chunks
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • ½ cup celery, diced
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon paprika - hot, sweet, or a mixture
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 or 2 tablespoons milk
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat with 2 tablespoons of the oil or butter. When the fat is hot, brown the veal chunks in batches, removing them as they finish.

  2. Wipe out the pan, reduce the heat to medium, and add the remaining oil. Cook the onion and celery until softened, 5 to 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook another minute. Add the wine, and cook a minute more.

  3. Return the veal to the skillet, and reduce the heat to a low simmer. Cover and cook until the veal is tender, 45 minutes or more. When the meat is done, remove to a plate, and raise the heat to high. When the liquid is all but gone, turn the heat as low as possible, and add the sour cream, thinned a bit with the milk. Return the veal to the pan, allow it all to warm through, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
In addition to a few more recipes using market ingredients, such as this week's Carrot-Potato Pancakes and Kürbisbrei mit Äpfeln (Pumpkin and Apple), we've also started posting information about the 2009 market season. Yes, we're already looking ahead and planning, and we'll keep the website updated as we determine more and more about next year's Growers' Market. Stop by and see it sometime!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, October 31st: Kürbisbrei mit Äpfeln (Pumpkin and Apple)

Seasonal Recipe
Kürbisbrei mit Äpfeln (Pumpkin and Apple)

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)
Serves 4

Though pumpkins and apples make for some very fine pies around this time of year, they're also excellent made into savory dishes, as in this old German recipe. This is best made with an apple that will hold its shape throughout the cooking process, though any flavorful apple will do. The trickiest part of this recipe is balancing the seasoning, so taste and adjust often with salt, sugar and lemon juice as you see fit.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. pumpkin, peeled, seeded, and cubed
  • 2 ounces bacon, cut into strips
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons butter, as needed
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • ¾ lbs. apples, peeled, cored, and cut into chunks
  • Lemon juice and zest
  • ½ cup water, or as needed
  • Salt and sugar, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the bacon with a tablespoon of butter until it begins to release its fat. Add the onions, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until they and the bacon begin to brown lightly. Add the pumpkin to the pan, along with enough water to come to a depth of ¼ inch. Cover the pan and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, until the pumpkin begins to soften.

  2. Add the apples to the pan, along with a squeeze of lemon juice and the zest of a lemon. Cook, uncovered, until the juices have evaporated and the apples have begun to fall apart. Pour off excess liquid if necessary, adjust the seasoning, and serve immediately.

Bonus Recipe, October 31st: Carrot-Potato Pancakes

Seasonal Recipe
Carrot-Potato Pancakes

Adapted from A World of Vegetable Cookery by Alex D. Hawkes (Simon and Schuster, 1968)
Makes about 12 pancakes

Potato pancakes are excellent, and take especially well to varied ingredients. Sweet potatoes make a delicious change of pace, as do these, which mix brightly colored carrots in with the potatoes for both color and a bit of a sweeter flavor. These are excellent with sour cream, and make a fine accompaniment to rich, hearty stews.

Ingredients:

  • 3 large carrots, grated
  • 3 medium potatoes, peeled and grated
  • ½ cup onion, finely diced
  • 1/3 cup parsley, finely chopped
  • ½ cup milk
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Butter or oil, as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large bowl, combine the carrots, potatoes, onion and parsley, mixing well. Add the remaining ingredients and mix until well blended.

  2. Heat a large pan or griddle over medium to medium-high heat. Grease well with butter or oil, and drop the batter by heaping spoonfuls onto the griddle. Cook until well browned, about 12 to 15 minutes, then flip and cook on the other side. Adjust the heat as necessary to prevent them from burning. Serve the pancakes immediately, with dollops of sour cream.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

News from the SVGM - October 24th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 24th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It feels a little bit more like winter every day, it seems, and the 2008 season of the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market will soon draw to a close. Now's the time to really stock up on all the best locally-grown produce and sustainably-raised meats to tide you through the cold and dark months of the year. We'll be back next May, of course, with all of the great market goods you've come to expect... and maybe a few more. Be sure to check our website from time to time, as we'll keep it updated with the latest list of the 2009 season's vendors.

For now, however, there's plenty of delicious food to find at the market. This week, you can expect to find plenty of good fillings for pies, so we're offering up two recipes: in the newsletter, one for a classic Pumpkin Pie; and on the website, another for a savory Swiss Chard Pie, which is also good with kale or any of the other cold-weather greens that look so good these days. And for those with a taste for whole wheat, try making your pie crust with some of the locally-grown whole wheat flour for sale this week by our guest vendor, White Frost Farm.

One last time for the season, we'll have the opportunity to enjoy the music of Woody Wolfe. Back at the Growers' Market, with acoustic guitar in tow, he'll be playing all of our favorite classics and cover songs throughout the market hours. For those who'd like to find Woody once the market takes its winter hiatus, take a moment to stop by the Heart To Hand Ministries website.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, October 24th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wheat flour and wheat berries
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cabbages
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Turnips
  • Radishes
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pumpkin Pie

Adapted from The Joy Of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Makes one 9-inch pie

Though pumpkins are excellent for Halloween carvings, there are plenty of delicious varieties for actual eating at the market, too. This recipe works just as well with winter squashes, such as butternut, provided they have a similarly firm, dense, and sweet flesh. Simply roast the pumpkin or squash in a moderate oven until the flesh is very soft, then force through a sieve or puree in a food processor.

If you find that the flesh seems loose and wet, allow it to drain in a colander lined with cheesecloth. Fold the cheesecloth over the top and weight down with a cake pan and 5 lbs. of weight, such as cans or jars filled with water. Allow to sit for 30 to 60 minutes. Reserve as much as you need for pies; the rest may be frozen in 2-cup quantities for easy measuring for future pies.

Ingredients:
  • 1 pie crust, preferably butter-based
  • 2 eggs, plus 1 egg yolk
  • 2 cups freshly cooked pumpkin puree
  • 1-½ cups light cream, or ¾ cup milk and ¾ cup heavy cream
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon salt
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Prepare the crust in a 9-inch pie pan, and glaze with the egg yolk.

  2. Whisk the eggs together in a large bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and whisk until smooth.

  3. Warm the pie crust in the oven until it is hot to the touch, while allowing the filling to stand at room temperature. This will help minimize the chances of ending up with a soggy crust. Pour the filling into the crust and bake until the filling is set but still quivers when nudged, 35 to 45 minutes. Allow to cool completely on a rack, and refrigerate for up to a day. Serve cold, at room temperature, or warm, with plenty of whipped cream.
* * * * *

On The Website
A homemade pie makes a wonderful dessert, and sometimes a fine breakfast the next morning. Sweet, however, isn't the only direction a pie can take. This week, on our website, we have a recipe for a Swiss Chard Pie, an elegant recipe that's substantial enough to serve as a main course.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, October 24th: Swiss Chard Pie

Seasonal Recipe
Swiss Chard Pie

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4 to 6 (or more as an appetizer)

This vegetarian pie is also excellent with other cooking greens, such as kale and spinach; you can even make it with other vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, or mushrooms. You can also swap out this crust, which is crumbly and biscuit-like, for the pie crust of your choice; it will certainly still be delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons butter, plus more as needed
  • About 8 large Swiss chard leaves, thinly sliced (or the equivalent in smaller, more tender leaves)
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, chervil, or chives
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup whole-milk yogurt or sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1-¼ cups flour
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Heat the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the chard and onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until the leaves are tender: about 10 minutes for large leaves; less for smaller, more tender chard. Remove from the heat, add the herbs, and adjust the seasoning.

  2. Meanwhile, hard-cook 3 of the eggs. Shell and coarsely chop. Add them to the chard mixture and allow to cool while you prepare the remaining ingredients.

  3. Combine the yogurt, mayonnaise, and remaining eggs. Add the baking powder and flour and mix until smooth. Lightly butter a large pie plate or 9x12 baking dish, and spread half of the batter over the bottom. Top with the chard mixture, then with the remaining batter. Use a spatula to make sure that there are no gaps in the top crust.

  4. Bake for 45 minutes. The top should be shiny and golden brown. Allow the pie to cool for at least 15 minutes before slicing. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

News from the SVGM - October 17th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 17th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's hard to believe that it's mid-October already, but we're already looking at the last few markets of the 2008 season. Now is the perfect time to visit your favorite vendors at the Growers' Market to ask about stocking up for the winter. There are plenty of delicious meats perfect for freezing, including the season's last order for Cornish hens from Beaver Run Farms; you can also pick up plenty of vegetables to store for those days when local food's tough to come by. Soon we'll have information about which vendors you can expect to find at the 2009 markets, when we return for our 5th year!

This week, we're offering up a pair of recipes to make use of the late-season produce. For a quick and easy dinner, try a southeast Asian specialty, Hmong-Style Beef With Radishes; just scroll down for the recipe. And for those looking for one of the easiest - and quite possibly the most delicious - ways to cook cauliflower (or broccoli), stop by our website for a Roasted Cauliflower or Broccoli recipe.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, October 17th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cabbages
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Honeycrisp apples
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Turnips
  • Asian greens
  • Radishes
  • Bell peppers
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Decorative gourds
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Hmong-Style Beef With Radishes

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 2

The Hmong people come from Laos in southeast Asia, where they'd make this with the large daikon radish or one of the spicy Chinese varieties, but it's just as good with a classic red radish or a red-and-white French Breakfast. Serve this with plenty of hot rice and a good hot sauce for dipping.

Ingredients:
  • ½ lb. ground beef
  • ½ cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup radishes, sliced
  • 3 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as cilantro, mint and basil
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ cup water
  • Soy sauce, to taste
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Heat a large skillet or wok over high heat for several minutes. Add the oil to the pan and swirl it about. Immediately add the onions, stir-frying for 2 minutes. Add the ground beef to the pan and cook until most of the pink has disappeared, about 2 to 3 minutes.

  2. Add the water to the pan. When it reaches the boil, add the radishes. Reduce the heat and simmer until the radishes are tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the herbs, and season to taste with soy sauce, salt, and pepper. Serve immediately with rice and hot sauce for dipping.
* * * * *

On The Website
Cauliflower can be a frustrating vegetable, one which can be utterly delicious when perfectly cooked, but quickly leaps to overcooked, especially when steamed or boiled. One way around this is to try Roasted Cauliflower or Broccoli, a simple recipe that works well for broccoli, too. More forgiving of overcooking, roasting enhances the cauliflower's flavor, and produces some of the tasty flavors of browned foods that steaming just can't accomplish. Check out the recipe on our website!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, October 17th: Roasted Cauliflower or Broccoli

Seasonal Recipe
Roasted Cauliflower or Broccoli

Serves 4

Cauliflower can be a frustrating vegetable, one which can be utterly delicious when perfectly cooked, but quickly leaps to overcooked, especially when steamed or boiled. One way around this is to roast it in the oven, a simple method that works well for broccoli, too. More forgiving of overcooking, roasting enhances the cauliflower's flavor, and produces some of the tasty flavors of browned foods that steaming just can't accomplish.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large head cauliflower or broccoli
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Lemon wedges (optional)
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Cut the cauliflower into florets; if using broccoli, keep as much of the stem as possible, removing any thick peel with a paring knife. In a large bowl, dress the vegetables with olive oil, salt and pepper, being sure to coat everything.

  2. Arrange the cauliflower in a single layer in a roasting pan or casserole. Place in the oven and cook until the vegetables are tender and beginning to brown at the edges, about 20 to 25 minutes. Serve immediately, with a squeeze of lemon if you like.

Thursday, October 9, 2008

News from the SVGM - October 10th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 10th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The season's first frosts have hit, which means we're about at the end of backyard tomatoes and other cold-sensitive crops. This week at the Growers' Market, look for the vegetables of fall, the cabbages and broccoli and winter squashes, including big, bright-orange pumpkins for your Halloween jack o' lanterns. This is also the time for slow-cooked roasts and meats for braising, including a website recipe for Roasted Pork With Cabbage. And, for an seasonally appropriate side dish, consider trying Acorn Squash Stuffed With Wild Rice, a dish that's as impressive-looking as it is delicious. Scroll down for the recipe!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, October 10th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Cabbages
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Honeycrisp apples
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Turnips
  • Asian greens
  • Chestnuts
  • Radishes
  • Bell peppers
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Decorative gourds
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Acorn Squash Stuffed With Wild Rice

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4 or more

Winter squash are a wonderful way to add the color of autumn to dinner; their natural sweetness matches well with all sorts of foods. Here, the relatively small acorn squash serves as an edible container. It's an elegant side dish for a meal as complicated as Thanksgiving or just a casual weekend meal.

Ingredients:
  • 2 or 3 acorn squash
  • 1 cup cooked wild rice
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 2 tablespoon orange zest
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • Chopped pecans or walnuts, to garnish
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Halve the squashes, scrape out the seeds, and rub the exposed flesh with the olive oil. Roast, cut side down, for 25 minutes.

  2. Meawhile, prepare the stuffing. Mix together the wild rice, garlic, orange juice and zest, and cranberries. When the squash are ready, flip them over and fill them with the stuffing. Return to the oven and roast until the flesh is tender, about 20 minutes. Remove to a plate, sprinkle with the chopped nuts, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Wondering what to do with one of those amazing, giant cabbages at the market? Homemade sauerkraut is one definite possibility, but it's also excellent when fresh, whether in a coleslaw or in this week's recipe, Roasted Pork With Cabbage. It's a hearty dish that can feed a hungry crowd, or one that reheats well for satisfying leftovers during the week. It's just the thing for the shortening days and cloudy skies of autumn!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, October 10th: Roasted Pork With Cabbage

Seasonal Recipe
Roasted Pork With Cabbage

Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1 by Julia Child (Knopf, 2004)

When cabbage arrives at the market in the fall, it may seem as though there's more than any reasonable person could eat, even those of us who really enjoy it. Despite appearances, however, it cooks down considerably, and takes quite well to dishes like this one, soaking up the flavors of the pork and other vegetables. If you prefer, consider making this roast and serving with homemade sauerkraut, another fine way to use our sweet, local cabbages.

Ingredients:

  • 1 3- to 4-lb. pork roast
  • 1 lb. green cabbage, cut into ½-inch slices (about 6 cups)
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • ½ teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 3 to 4 teaspoons salt, plus more to taste
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper, plus more to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice
  • 2 cloves garlic, mashed
  • 4 tablespoons lard or cooking oil
Directions:
  1. Prepare the dry rub for the pork ahead of time; the meat should have time to absorb the seasonings before cooking. 24 hours is ideal, although 6 hours is sufficient. Mix together 1 teaspoon of salt per pound of pork with the black pepper, allspice, and garlic. Rub all over the surface of the pork, and refrigerate. Turn the meat several times during as it marinates.

  2. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Wipe the surface of the roast clean, and pat dry with paper towels. Heat a casserole dish large enough to hold the pork over medium-high heat, and add the lard. When the fat is almost smoking, brown the roast well on all sides. Remove the meat to a plate.

  3. Pour all but 2 tablespoons of fat from the casserole. If the fat has burned, discard all of it and add another 2 tablespoons. Reduce the heat to medium and cook the onions and carrots for several minutes until they begin to soften.

  4. Return the pork to the casserole, with its fattiest side up. Cover the casserole and cook on the stovetop until the meat begins to sizzle, then transfer to the oven. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Boil the cabbage for 2 minutes, then drain in a colander and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.

  5. After the pork has roasted for an hour, arrange the cabbage around it, basting everything with the accumulated juices in the casserole. Sprinkle the caraway seeds over the cabbage. Return to the oven and cook until the pork is cooked through and tender. Each time you check for doneness, baste with the juices.

  6. To serve, remove the pork to a platter. Lift the cabbage from the pan with a pair of forks to allow it to drain and arrange around the roast. Degrease the pan juices, and pour over the cabbage. Serve immediately.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

News from the SVGM - October 3rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
October 3rd, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
October has arrived, and we're down to the last month of markets for the 2008 season. There are still many good things to find at the market this week, however. It's a time for firing up the stove and oven, and filling the house with the aromas of delicious, home-cooked food. Nothing does that quite so well as good food roasting in the oven, whether it's a delicious, pasture-raised chicken or one of the lovely winter squash that are now starting to populate the market tables. Yes, pumpkins and winter squash are ready to take home, for carving or for eating, and the broccoli - and, with a little luck, cauliflower - are looking especially good. This week, we're providing a recipe for Roman-style Broccoli on our website, for an Italian perspective on that very Italian vegetable.

We also have a recipe for a simple Smoked Salmon Soup in the newsletter; scroll down to see it. Wild For Salmon has two types of smoked salmon this year, so stop by for a comparison taste. And while you mull that over, consider reserving a Cornish hen or two from Beaver Run Farms; they'll be bringing those birds next week. It sounds like this will be the second-to-last chance for a taste of those little chickens this season, so don't miss out!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, October 3rd, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons - cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Honeycrisp apples
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Grapes
  • Turnips
  • Asian greens
  • Chestnuts
  • Bell peppers
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Decorative gourds
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Smoked Salmon Soup

Adapted from The Frugal Gourmet Cooks American by Jeff Smith (Wm. Morrow, 1987)
Serves 4

When the weather grows cold, a bowl of warm soup hits the spot. This recipe, which traces its origins back to the natives of the Pacific Northwest, uses a few basic ingredients to make a flavorful soup in a very short time. Originally, this would have made use of the various wild foods readily available, and salmon would likely have been smoked as much for preservation as for flavor. You can make this soup with fresh salmon, if you prefer, but the extra flavor of a good hot-smoked salmon makes it even better.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. hot-smoked salmon, broken into bite-size pieces
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch spinach leaves, or other hearty green, coarsely chopped
  • 1 quart chicken stock, vegetable stock, or water
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. In a saucepan, bring the stock, salmon and onion to a boil, then reduce to a bare simmer and cook for 15 minutes. Add the spinach or other greens and cook for another 5 minutes, or until the leaves are cooked and tender. Check for seasoning and ladle into warmed bowls. Serve immediately, preferably with some good, fresh bread.
* * * * *

On The Website
Broccoli, that close cousin of cauliflower, cabbage, and even Brussels sprouts, has been popular for at least three centuries. Though it appears that broccoli was first developed in Italy, possibly the province of Calabria, it's certainly become a popular vegetable throughout most of the world. The Englishmen who once called it "Italian asparagus" would probably be surprised to see its popularity in such far-flung places as eastern Asia and America. Of course, even they would probably admit that a dish like the classic Roman-style Broccoli, Broccoli al Peperoncino, is hard one to beat.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, October 3rd: Roman-style Broccoli

Seasonal Recipe
Roman-style Broccoli

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)

Broccoli, that close cousin of cauliflower, cabbage, and even Brussels sprouts, has been popular for at least three centuries. Even the British, not known for an adventurous nature when it comes to vegetables, have been enjoying this green wonder since the early 18th century. Though it appears that broccoli was first developed in Italy, possibly the province of Calabria, it's certainly become a popular vegetable throughout most of the world. The Englishmen who once called it "Italian asparagus" would probably be surprised to see its popularity in such far-flung places as eastern Asia and America.

Of course, even they would probably admit that a dish like this classic, Broccoli al Peperoncino, is hard one to beat. The simple, bold flavors of chilli and olive oil really highlight broccoli's sweet nature. Cauliflower is also delicious here, and looks just as sharp with the bright red pepper as contrast.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large head broccoli, or 2 smaller heads
  • 2 dried red chillis, or hot red pepper flakes
  • 1 or 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • ½ sweet red bell pepper, chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Trim the broccoli into small florets, keeping as much stem attached to each piece as possible. Use a paring knife or a vegetable peeler to remove any thick skin along the stem; the skin may be tough, but the stem is as delicious as the rest of the plant. Blanch the broccoli in boiling, salted water for 3 or 4 minutes, until just tender, then remove to an ice bath to stop the cooking and set the green color. Drain thoroughly before proceeding.

  2. Chop up the chillis and place in a large, cold skillet with the sweet bell pepper and garlic. Add enough olive oil to cover the base in a thin layer. Place the skillet over low heat and cook for about ten minutes to let the oil absorb the flavors of the peppers and garlic. Raise the heat to medium and add the broccoli to the pan, and stir to coat evenly. Allow the broccoli to reheat, but take care not to brown it or overcook it. When ready, transfer to a serving dish, and top with the bits of chilli, pepper and garlic. Serve immediately.