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Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

News from the SVGM - September 26th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 26th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
We've crossed into autumn, and with October on the horizon, it's time for a uniquely Pennsylvanian celebration: Goose Day! Most commonly associated with Lewistown and Mifflin County, this September 29th holiday continues the medieval tradition of Michaelmas. Though it has disappeared from most places, including much of rural England, where it began, the annual roast goose feast is still alive and well. For those who have already reserved their birds, we have a recipe for Simple Roast Goose this week. If you're still interested, there should be more birds to reserve for that special Christmas goose.

If there's one thing that the goose is known for, it's plenty of good, delicious fat. Be sure to save it from your roast, or check out our recipe for Rendered Goose Fat on the website this week. And, to use some of those end-of-season tomatoes in a different way, you can accompany your goose with a Tomato & Cheese Pie. Or perhaps some of the season's first chestnuts, which should be appearing this week, along with winter squash, broccoli, and possibly even a new lineup of flavorful dry rubs from our resident salsa man.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, September 26th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons - cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Honeycrisp apples
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Grapes
  • Turnips
  • Asian greens
  • Chestnuts
  • Bell peppers
  • Pumpkins and winter squash
  • Decorative gourds
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas, barbecue sauces, and hot sauces
  • Dry rubs and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Simple Roast Goose

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 6 to 10

There are just about as many ways to prepare a goose as there are for any other good bird, but it's hard to top a well-roasted goose, especially when you're feeding a crowd. (And you'd like to have that whole bird, covered in crispy, bronzed skin to show off.) Like with a duck, you will find less meat per pound of bird than when compared to a chicken, but the rich, dark meat is more satisfying. If you're looking to stretch it further, then you may wish to consider stuffing the goose, just as you would a turkey. Stuffings with fruit and herbs are especially good.

Do be sure to save any excess fat that you trim from the bird before roasting. When rendered, it makes for one of the most flavorful cooking fats around. Used in place of other cooking oils, it can lend an additional layer of flavor and sophistication to even the simplest dishes.

Ingredients:
  • 1 (8- to 10-lb.) goose, excess fat removed, rinsed and patted dry
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Prick the goose skin all over with a sharp fork or thin-bladed knife, being careful not to pierce the meat. Season the goose with salt and pepper and place it, breast side down, on a rack in a roasting pan.

  2. Place the roasting pan in the oven and roast for 20 minutes, then prick the exposed skin again. Roast another 20 minutes, or until the skin begins to brown. Flip the bird breast side up, prick again, and baste with some of the pan juices. Roast for another hour, pricking the skin and basting every 20 to 30 minutes.

  3. Unless the goose skin is already very brown, raise the oven temperature to 400°F to finish roasting, about another 30 minutes. At that point, the juices should run clear, and the leg bons should wiggle slightly in its socket. An instant-read thermometer inserted into the thigh should measure about 180°F. Allow the bird to rest for at least 20 minutes, then carve and serve.
* * * * *

On The Website
All ready to celebrate Goose Day on Monday? While you're roasting that bird to a lustrous bronze, don't forget to check out our recipe for making your own delicious Rendered Goose Fat. If you're not one for potatoes fried in goose fat - and they are especially good that way - then why not try a Tomato & Cheese Pie with some of the last of this season's tomatoes? When autumn rolls around, it's hard to tell when they'll disappear, so snap them up while they're still good and fresh!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, September 26th: Rendered Goose Fat

Seasonal Recipe
Rendered Goose Fat

Adapted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 1 by Julia Child (Knopf, 2004)

When roasting a goose, you will need to trim away excess skin and fat. Rendering out the fat, which you can easily do while the bird roasts, leaves you with a wonderful cooking fat and grattons, or goose cracklings. The cracklings make for a delicious snack, or can be ground and warmed with a little salt, pepper, and allspice for a tasty spread for crackers or toast. The fat is excellent for sautes, for flavoring cabbage or sauerkraut dishes, or any place that a little extra flavor would be welcome.

Ingredients:

  • Goose skin and fat, trimmed from the bird
  • 1 cup water
Directions:
  1. Cut the fat, with any attached skin, into ½-inch pieces. Place in a saucepan with cup of water and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes to draw the fat out from the tissues.

  2. Uncover the pan and boil slowly to evaporate the water. As the moisture evaporates, the fat will make spluttering noises; when these stop, the fat is rendered. The liquid will be a pale yellow, flecked with lightly browned particles. Strain the liquid into a jar.

  3. Use the rendered fat immediately, or refrigerate for several weeks. Reserve the grattons for another recipe.

Bonus Recipe, September 26th: Tomato & Cheese Pie

Seasonal Recipe
Tomato & Cheese Pie

Adapted from a recipe from the Park Seed Company
Serves 8

This recipe comes to us courtesy of Cathy Kelley, who cites it as that perfect combination of "very, very easy and delicious." It's also a fine way to use up some of those late-season tomatoes, when they're still fresh from the vine, but the weather's cool enough to make an oven-warmed kitchen seem awfully nice.

If you're looking for an excellent pie crust to use with this recipe, the New York Times offers a wonderfully crisp and flaky version. If you don't have a food processor, as their recipe recommends, it still works quite well with a pastry cutter, a pair of knives, or even your fingertips to cut the fat into the flour.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pie crust, bottom only, preferably butter- or lard-based
  • 2 to 3 large, ripe beefsteak tomatoes, or the equivalent in smaller, ripe tomatoes
  • ¾ cup mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, torn, or 2 tablespoons dried
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Cut the tomatoes into ¼-inch slices. Season both sides with salt and pepper, and leave to sit on paper towels for at least 15 minutes draw out excess moisture. Meanwhile, mix together the mayonnaise, ¾ cup of the cheese, and the basil.

  2. Roll out the pie crust and place in a pie pan. Arrange half of the tomatoes over the bottom of the crust, and top with half of the mayonnaise-cheese mixture, spreading it evenly. Repeat another layer with the remaining tomatoes and mayonnaise, finishing by sprinkling the last of the shredded cheese over the top. Bake for 25 minutes, or until the cheese is golden brown. Serve immediately.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

News from the SVGM - September 19th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 19th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's certainly feeling like autumn these days, with cool weather and the equinox just a few days away. There are still plenty of great local foods to find at the Growers' Market, and also at some of Lewisburg's local restaurants. This Friday, September 19th, is the first "Lewisburg Local Night Out," a celebration organized by our local Buy Fresh Buy Local campaign. Restaurants throughout Lewisburg will be serving special dishes featuring locally-sourced foods, from farms including our own market vendors. Stop by the market for something delicious to take home, then stop in to your favorite restaurant to see what some of our talented local chefs can do with the same ingredients.

Participating restaurants include:
  • Brasserie Louis
  • The Bull Run Inn
  • Cherry Alley CafĂ©
  • Elizabeth's
  • Mya's Cafe
  • Puirseil's Irish Pub
  • Reba & Pancho's
  • The Towne Tavern
  • Zelda's


We'll also have some special music for this Friday. Woody Wolfe will be back with his guitar in hand, playing a selection of popular cover songs until the restaurant festivities begin at 6pm. Stop in to listen while you wait for your table!

Goose Day is coming up soon, as well, so now's the time to reserve your bird! Check in with Cow-A-Hen Farm to get your goose in time for the September 29th celebration. It's a uniquely local tradition, and a fine excuse for enjoying such a special bird. We'll have a recipe on the website next week, for those who might be curious. This week, though, we're focusing on comfort foods; scroll down for an Italian recipe for Chicken Soup with Passatelli. It's simple, and at its best with some homemade Basic Chicken Stock. Follow it up with Maple Bread Pudding for dessert, and you have just the right remedy for the cooling nights of autumn.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, September 19th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons - cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Grapes
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Summer squash
  • Gourds
  • Horseradish
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Farm fresh eggs
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken Soup with Passatelli

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 4

It's not at all unusual for chicken soup to have little or no actual meat in it, with most of the rich, meaty flavor coming from a well-made stock. A soup such as this one could include pieces of cooked chicken, or an assortment of vegetables, or even replace the chicken stock with vegetable stock for a vegetarian version.

There is a special instrument for creating passatelli noodles, which forces the batter through small holes to create long noodles as the batter hits the hot stock. A food mill works well, too; you could also use a potato ricer, or a spaetzle maker, depending on what you have handy.

Ingredients:
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • ½ cup fresh bread crumbs
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley, minced
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large pot, bring the chicken stock to a boil. In a bowl, combine the the cheese, bread crumbs, parsley, salt, pepper, and nutmeg; then stir in the eggs. It should be like a wet dough. If it seems stiff, add up to a tablespoon of water or stock to thin.

  2. Reduce the heat so that the stock simmers. Place a food mill (or ricer) over the stock, using the plate with the large holes, and put the dough inside. Crank the food mill so that the dough falls into the simmering stock in strands. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, then turn off the heat and allow to sit another 2 to 3 minutes before serving. Garnish with a little additional parsley, if you like.
* * * * *

On The Website
Store-bought chicken stock can't hold a candle to homemade; if you've done it before, we have a nearly fool-proof recipe for Basic Chicken Stock, as well as a few variations, on our website. And, if you're feeling the cold-weather urge for comfort food these days, why not try making some Maple Bread Pudding with some of the fine breads available from the market? Even though a loaf has started to go stale, there are still plenty of good ways to enjoy it!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, September 19th: Basic Chicken Stock

Seasonal Recipe
Basic Chicken Stock

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Makes about 3 quarts

Chicken stock tastes best when it uses a combination of bones and meat, though you can certainly make it with whatever you have handy. Keep your freezer stocked with extra chicken parts, such as backs, necks, and wings, and you can pull them out for a batch of stock when you've accumulated enough. The recipe below is a rough guideline, so work with what you have. For an especially rich and flavorful stock, roast the chicken parts and vegetables in a very hot oven for half an hour, or until well browned. Extra effort, yes; but it makes a broth that's a hearty soup all by itself.

Do note that the stock recipe does not call for salt. If you only intend to use it as a soup broth, with little or no further cooking, you may season it to taste, but be careful. If you end up using the stock in another dish, especially where it is reduced to intensify the flavor, the saltiness can become overwhelming.

Ingredients:

  • 3 to 4 lbs. chicken parts and/or bones
  • 1 cup roughly chopped onion
  • 1 cup roughly chopped carrot
  • ½ cup roughly chopped celery
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • ½ bay leaf
  • Several sprigs fresh parsley
  • About 4 quarts water
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large stockpot. Bring almost to a boil, then cover partially and reduce to a bare simmer. Cook until the meat falls from the bones and the bones separate from one another, which will take at least 2 hours. Skim any foam that may form off the surface from time to time.

  2. Strain the stock through a colander lined with a cheesecloth, and press on the vegetables and meat to extract as much flavor as possible. Refrigerate for up to 4 or 5 days, or freeze for longer storage. If you prefer, you can wait until the fat hardens on the surface in the refrigerator, then simply remove it.

Bonus Recipe, September 19th: Maple Bread Pudding

Seasonal Recipe
Maple Bread Pudding

Adapted from The Joy Of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 8

Bread puddings are simple, comforting desserts that can be made with leftover, day-old bread. Much like French toast, using slightly stale bread allows it to better soak up the rich, eggy mixture, resulting in a firm, custardy dish that's always popular with a crowd. It's also a very forgiving and adaptable recipe, one that happily changes to suit whatever happens to be at hand.

Ingredients:

  • 8 to 10 slices bread (about 10 oz.)
  • 9 large egg yolks
  • ¾ cup pure maple syrup, preferably Grade B
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • Zest of an orange (optional)
  • Butter
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F, and lightly butter an 8x8-inch pan or a 9x2-inch round pan. Trim the crusts from the bread, and cut into ½-inch cubes. You should have approximately 4 cups. Spread these on a baking sheet and toast in the oven, stirring occasionally, until they turn golden brown. Turn out into the prepared pan.

  2. Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F. Whisk together the egg yolks and maple syrup, until blended. Then whisk in the heavy cream and orange zest. Pour the mixture evenly over the bread, and allow to stand for 20 minutes. Press down on the bread every five minutes or so to help it absorb the liquid. Butter a sheet of aluminum foil and cover the pudding.

  3. Bake the pudding in a water bath until the center is firm, about 60 to 75 minutes. Serve warm, drizzled with more maple syrup, with scoops of good vanilla ice cream.

Thursday, September 11, 2008

News from the SVGM - September 12th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 12th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's high season for melons at the Growers' Market! Ripe and utterly delicious, there are all sorts of melons to choose from this Friday. Whether your taste runs more to watermelons or cantaloupes or honeydew melons, you can expect to find piles of rich, fragrant fruit ready to take home. For an extra-special treat, take home one of the green cantaloupes from the market this Friday; they're guaranteed to be a surprise for friends and family. Sliced, they look like a honeydew, but have the most wonderful muskmelon fragrance and flavor. Serve slices for brunch with a Tomato & Onion Frittata, or maybe as an appetizer before a meal of Eggplant & Sausage Stew.

We have more music lined up for this week: Billy D. and Rosie will be at the market, performing a selection of oldies and other popular tunes. Stop by and check it out!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, September 12th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons - cantaloupe, honeydew, and watermelon
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Pears
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash
  • Gourds
  • Horseradish
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Farm fresh eggs
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Tomato & Onion Frittata

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 4, or 8 to 12 as an appetizer

The frittata, a classic Italian egg pie, is essentially a streamlined version of an omelet or a quiche. It can be quickly adapted to incorporate all sorts of fillings, from vegetables to cheeses to meats, and takes little to no practice to perfect. To top things off, it's delicious either hot or at room temperature, and makes an equally impressive dish for brunch or an appetizer before dinner.

Ingredients:
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil
  • ½ cup grated cheese
  • ½ cup diced onion
  • ½ cup diced tomato
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. In an ovenproof skillet, preferably cast-iron or non-stick, melt the butter over medium heat. Saute the onion in the butter until soft but not brown, about 5 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, beat the eggs in a bowl with the cheese, salt, and pepper. When the onions are ready, pour the eggs into the skillet, and give a brief stir to mix the onions about evenly. Spread the tomatoes over the top, and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook, without disturbing, for about 10 minutes, or until the bottom of the frittata is firm.

  3. Transfer to the oven to finish cooking, checking every few minutes. The top should no longer be runny, which may take 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and slide onto a serving plate. Serve immediately if you would like it hot, or allow to cool to room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
With the cool and wet weather returning, it's suddenly nice to have a warm kitchen again, full of the smells of slow cooking. While it's still warm enough to enjoy the season's tomatoes and eggplant, why not try some Eggplant & Sausage Stew? Give it a shot with some of the market's fine Italian sausage - mild or hot - or change up the spices to accommodate your favorite fresh pork sausage. See the recipe on our website.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, September 12th: Eggplant & Sausage Stew

Seasonal Recipe
Eggplant & Sausage Stew

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 8 to 10

Eggplant can be quite delicious on its own, though it often works brilliantly when combined with Italian flavors, as here. This recipe works equally well with the more common large, purple eggplant and the smaller heirloom varieties. One benefit of the smaller eggplant, especially Asian varieties, is that the thin skins do not require peeling.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. eggplant, peeled if desired, and cut into bite-size chunks
  • 2 lbs. hot or mild Italian sausage, or a mixture
  • 1 large onion, cut into bite-size chunks
  • 2 tablespoons garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 lbs. tomatoes, peeled if desired, and coarsely chopped
  • 1-½ cups red wine
  • 2 teaspoons fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 1-½ teaspoons fennel seeds, ground
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a skillet over medium-low heat, cook the sausages in a small amount of olive oil. Turn them occasionally to allow them to brown evenly as the cook through. Remove from the heat and cut into bite-size pieces.

  2. Heat the remaining olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic, until they are softened but not brown, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the eggplant to the pot, and continue to cook, stirring, until the eggplant begins to color, another 5 to 10 minutes.

  3. Add the wine to the pot, and scrape the bottom with a wooden spoon to release any flavorful bits stuck there. Stir in the tomatoes, oregano, fennel, and bay leaves. Bring the pot to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes.

  4. Add the sausage chunks to the stew, and simmer another 10 minutes, until the flavors have blended. Serve immediately, or cool and refrigerate overnight. The nex day, when reheated, the stew will taste even better.

Thursday, September 4, 2008

News from the SVGM - September 5th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 5th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
We're past Labor Day; school's back in session; and the heat of summer seems to be back for one last reminder that fall is still a few weeks away. Now is the season to enjoy ripe, fragrant melons, such as honeydews and green cantaloupes, that are unlike any you'll find elsewhere. Horseradish has also arrived, and we have a recipe for Homemade Horseradish Sauce on the website this week. It's especially delicious on any hamburgers that you might be tossing on the grill as the outdoor cooking season winds down. We also have a recipe for an Heirloom Tomato Salad with Blue Cheese this week, from one of our regular market customers! Scroll down to check it out!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, September 5th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash
  • Horseradish
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Heirloom Tomato Salad with Blue Cheese

Adapted from Bon Appetit magazine, August 2003
Serves 6 to 8

This recipe comes recommended from market regular Christine Sperling, who says, "Here's a great summer salad that I make a lot with the wonderful tomatoes available here." She notes that she often skips the steps for the garlic toasts, but if you already have the grill going, it's a wonderful addition to the salad.

Ingredients:
  • 10 medium heirloom tomatoes of assorted colors, cored, thinly sliced
  • 1 small red onion, sliced paper-thin
  • 3 celery stalks, sliced thinly on diagonal
  • 1-½ cups coarsely crumbled blue cheese
  • 8 ½-inch-thick slices crusty bread
  • 4 large garlic cloves, halved
  • 3 tablespoons plus 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup currant or grape tomatoes or halved cherry or pear tomatoes
  • ½ cup chopped green onions
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Start up the grill (or broiler). Rub the slices of bread with cut garlic halves, then brush the bread with the 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Combine remaining 1/3 cup oil, currant tomatoes, and green onions in medium bowl; toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper.

  2. Overlap the tomato slices in concentric circles on a platter, alternating colors. Scatter the onion and celery slices over the tomatoes, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spoon the tomato and green onion mixture over the top. Sprinkle with crumbled cheese.

  3. When the grill is at medium-high heat, grill the bread slices until golden, about 2 minutes per side. Cut each slice diagonally in half, and serve immediately with the salad.
* * * * *

On The Website
If you have the grill going for this week's Heirloom Tomato Salad, why not cook up a few hamburgers or steaks from the market? Instead of topping those burgers with everyday ketchup and mustard, why not try a little Homemade Horseradish Sauce? It's powerful, sinus-clearing stuff, to be sure, but the combination of rich beef and spicy horseradish is a hard one to top. The recipe's on our website this week, as just one of the many recipes we have featuring some of the best market meats and produce.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, September 5th: Homemade Horseradish Sauce

Seasonal Recipe
Homemade Horseradish Sauce

Adapted from From How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Makes about 1 cup

You can make horseradish sauce with either a food processor or a hand grater, though it's much easier with the former. Freshly grated horseradish is powerful stuff, so you may want to consider wearing goggles and gloves, especially if you're planning to make large quantities. This will keep indefinitely in the refrigerator, and the heat will lessen over time. If it's too hot on day one, try mixing it with a little sour cream or mayonnaise until time tempers it to your taste.

Ingredients:

  • 1 horseradish root, about 1 foot long
  • ½ cup white wine vinegar
  • Salt to taste
Directions:
  1. Peel off the outer skin from the horseradish, and cut the root into chunks. Place in the bowl of a food processor with about half of the vinegar, cover, and turn on the machine.

  2. Continue to process, stopping and scraping down the sides as needed, until the horseradish is finely minced. (Alternately, you can grate the root by hand; do this as finely as possible.) Taste, and add vinegar and salt as necessary. Store, tightly sealed, in the refrigerator.