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Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

News from the SVGM - August 29th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 29th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
September is around the corner, and we're excited to welcome Wild For Salmon back to the Growers' Market for the 2008 season. After spending much of June and July fishing for wild salmon on Alaska's Bristol Bay, they've returned to our region with plenty of delicious salmon. If you've never had the pleasure, the flavor of wild Pacific salmon is worlds apart from the common farmed Atlantic salmon typically found in the grocery store. See below for a sample recipe, Salmon Roasted in Butter, that emphasizes the rich, natural flavor of these wild fish. As a seasonal side dish, just as simple and full of intense flavor, try pairing that salmon with an Ethiopian Tomato Salad; the recipe is available on our website.

Woody Wolfe returns to the market this week, with guitar in hand, ready to perform a wide selection of cover songs while you shop. Be sure to stop by and enjoy the music while you shop and eat!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, August 29th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Wild-caught Alaskan salmon
  • Melons
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Kale
  • Green beans
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Salmon Roasted in Butter

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 2 to 4

Wild-caught salmon is intensely flavored, capable of standing up to just about any other strongly-flavored foods. Sometimes, though, it's best to appreciate the flavor of the salmon itself. Now, when we begin to get our first taste of this season's catch, it serves as a reminder of why this fish is such a special treat. Like a perfect, ripe summer tomato, this is a food well worth the annual wait.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. salmon fillet
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons fresh herbs, or to taste, such as tarragon, dill, basil, thyme, or parsley
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 475° F. Melt the butter in a medium roasting pan, either on the stovetop or in the oven, until the foam subsides.

  2. Sprinkle the herbs over the salmon and season with salt and pepper. Place the salmon in the butter, flesh side down, and roast in the oven for about 5 minutes. Flip the fillets over and continue to cook until the salmon is done, another 3 to 6 minutes. Garnish with more herbs, if you like, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Try pairing the first of this season's salmon with an Ethiopian Tomato Salad, one of those tasty, simple dishes that's brilliant with the good, ripe tomatoes of summer. Now, of course, there are so many tomatoes available at the market, from traditional, meaty reds to multicolored heirlooms, and any combination works perfectly here.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, August 29th: Ethiopian Tomato Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Ethiopian Tomato Salad

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Makes about 4 cups

Those perfectly ripe summer tomatoes make wonderful tomato sauce for pasta; go so well in thick slices on sandwiches and hamburgers; and make for fine homemade salsas. This recipe, which takes just a few minutes to prepare, is quite similar to a fresh tomato salsa. It's equally delicious with the traditional red tomatoes or the multicolored heirloom varieties available at the market throughout the growing season.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large tomatoes, cored and coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon minced jalapeno pepper, or to taste
  • ¼ cup minced onion
  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Mix together the jalapeno, onion, lemon juice, and turmeric in a serving bowl. Add in the tomatoes, toss to coat, and season to taste. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to half an hour.

Thursday, August 21, 2008

News from the SVGM - August 22nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 22nd, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
There's music and good food to be had at the Grower's Market this week: Woody Wolfe will be back this Friday, playing a variety of classic and alternative rock cover songs on his acoustic guitar. Come and listen while stocking up on good, fresh, local food for the week, and for the winter season when local foods are tough to find. Now's the time to think about canning, pickling, freezing and drying everything at the peak of its flavor, so you can enjoy delicious food from the Growers' Market on some snowy January evening.

As promised in last week's newsletter, we have a recipe for Glazed Cornish Hen with Wild Rice and Mushroom Stuffing this week, as well as an alternate version, Rice, Chorizo and Hot Chilli Stuffing, on the website. And, in case you're not sure what to do with the summer's eggplant and zucchini, we have an Indian-inspired recipe for Stuffed Vegetables with Sookha Keema, too. This week, you can also expect to find Macneal Orchards with plenty of fresh apples and maple syrup, as well our regular vendors with plenty of sweet corn, tomatoes, eggplant, and more!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, August 22nd, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Apples: Viking, Jerseymac, and Tydeman Red
  • Apple sauce mixes
  • Maple syrup
  • Watermelons
  • Cantaloupes
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Green, yellow, purple, and roman snap beans
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Homemade dog treats
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Glazed Cornish Hen with Wild Rice and Mushroom Stuffing

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 1 to 2

Cornish hens, being little chickens, take well to many of the same preparations, and can make for a very impressive presentation. A single bird will serve one or two people, depending on their size and diners' appetites. This recipe, which makes use of a wild rice stuffing, is a traditional way of serving, but you can also swap out the stuffing for the Rice, Chorizo and Hot Chilli Stuffing on the website for more adventurous eaters. The ingredients here are for a single bird; scale everything accordingly to feed your guests.

It's always best to be careful when cooking a stuffed bird, whether it be a little Cornish hen, a full-sized chicken, or a Thanksgiving turkey. Check the temperature of the breasts, the thighs, and the center of the stuffing, to be sure that everything has been thoroughly cooked. If you're wary of cooking a stuffed bird, simply roast the bird and stuffing separately. Serve them side by side, or even spoon the cooked stuffing inside the roasted bird before taking it to the table. A quick blast from a kitchen torch, if you have one, can crisp up the edges, and no one can tell the difference.

Ingredients:
  • 1 Cornish hen
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon jelly or seedless jam
  • 2 tablespoons mushrooms, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons onion, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup wild rice, cooked
  • ½ teaspoon fresh thyme, or ¼ teaspoon dried
  • ¼ teaspoon fresh or dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Rinse the bird and pat dry. Season all over, including inside the cavity, with salt and pepper. Allow to rest in the refrigerator while you prepare the stuffing and preheat the oven to 400°F.

  2. Heat the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms, onion, garlic, and herbs, and cook for about 5 minutes, until the onions have softened. Remove to a bowl, and mix with the wild rice. At this point, you could simply cook the stuffing on its own; bake in a 350 to 400°F oven for 15 to 20 minutes, until it is hot and starting to brown at the edges.

  3. Fill the hen's body cavity with about ½ cup of stuffing. Tie its legs together at the ankles, and place breast side up on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Roast for 25 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the glaze by warming the jam and balsamic vinegar together over low heat. Remove the bird form the oven and brush generously with the glaze. Add a very shallow layer of water to the bottom of the roasting pan to prevent smoking, and return the bird to the oven. Roast for another 20 to 25 minutes, or until the meat and stuffing have been completely cooked. Remove the bird to a platter, and allow to rest 10 minutes before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Want a chicken stuffing with a little more spice? Try filling your birds with Rice, Chorizo and Hot Chilli Stuffing for an unusual - and delicious - summertime treat. And, while we're busy stuffing foods, why not try Stuffed Vegetables with Sookha Keema, which is a simple way to use eggplant, zucchini, or peppers for an impressive dish.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, August 22nd: Rice, Chorizo and Hot Chilli Stuffing

Seasonal Recipe
Rice, Chorizo and Hot Chilli Stuffing

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Makes about 4 cups

Here's an alternative stuffing to the one used in the recipe for Glazed Cornish Hen with Wild Rice and Mushroom Stuffing. It's rich and flavorful enough to help stretch a roasted bird for a larger crowd. If you happen to like heat, feel free to include some jalapeno or serrano peppers in the mix; if the poblanos are a bit much for your dinner guests, replace them with a sweet bell pepper. This recipe makes a larger amount of stuffing than in the other recipe, so scale it accordingly.

For a quick and easy way to make your own chorizo sausage, see the note at the bottom of our recipe for Tacos de Papa con Chorizo.

Ingredients:

  • ½ lb. chorizo
  • 2 poblano peppers
  • 1 cup onions, diced
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 2 cups cooked white or brown rice
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • ¼ cup cilantro, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Roast the poblano peppers over a gas flame, on a grill, or under the broiler, until the skin begins to blister and char on all sides. Allow to cool until you can comfortably handle them, then peel off the skin. This may be easier under running water. Remove the stems and seeds, and dice the peppers.

  2. In a skillet over medium-high heat, warm the olive oil. Cook the onions and garlic until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the chorizo and cook, stirring, until it is no longer pink, about 10 minutes. Remove to a bowl.

  3. Mix in the remaining ingredients and stir to combine. At this point, you may use it as a stuffing, or bake it in a shallow, buttered baking dish. In a 350°F oven, it should take about 20 minutes to heat the stuffing through. Serve immediately.

Bonus Recipe, August 22nd: Stuffed Vegetables with Sookha Keema

Seasonal Recipe
Stuffed Vegetables with Sookha Keema

Adapted from Classic Indian Cooking by Julie Sahni (Morrow, 1980)
Serves 4 to 6

Sookha keema is a basic Indian dish made from ground meat, sometimes served as a main dish, though frequently used as a stuffing for pastries, breads, and, as here, vegetables. By stuffing vegetables, they absorb the flavors of the meat and spices during cooking.

Garam masala, called for here, is a mixture of spices used frequently in Indian cooking. You can purchase pre-made mixes or prepare your own. Many cooks make their own personal blends, and a typical example includes cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, black peppercorns, cumin, and coriander, roasted and ground together.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • Vegetables for stuffing, such as eggplant, zucchini, or bell peppers
  • 2/3 cup onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 1-½ tablespoons fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 2 green chilli peppers, such as serrano or jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala
  • ¼ cup hot water
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the oil. Add the onions and cook, sitrring, until they begin to turn a caramel brown, about 10 minutes.

  2. Add the garlic, ginger, and chillis to the pan, and cook for another 2 minutes before adding the beef. Cook the beef until it browns, and add the turmeric. Stir to combine, then add the hot water. Reduce the heat to a simmer, cover the skillet, and cook until all of the liquid has been absorbed, about 25 minutes. Check occasionally and stir to prevent sticking. Turn off the heat and stir in the garam masala, lemon juice, and cilantro.

  3. While the meat is cooking, prepare the vegetables for stuffing. Slice zucchini and eggplant in half, and scoop out seeds and centers; for bell peppers, slice off the tops and scoop out any seeds and ribs. Season the insides of the vegetables with salt.

  4. In a large, lidded pot or a casserole dish, melt the butter over medium heat. Stuff the vegetables with the meat mixture, and place in the hot butter, allowing them to brown slightly for a few minutes before covering and reducing the heat to a bare simmer. A layer of aluminum foil between the pot and lid will help ensure a moisture-tight seal. Alternately, you can finish out the cooking in a 350°F oven. Times will vary depending on the vegetables you're using, so check for doneness and stir occasionally. Most will finish cooking in about 20 to 25 minutes. If the vegetables appear to be sticking or burning, add a little water to the pan. When finished, remove to a serving platter, and serve immediately.

Thursday, August 14, 2008

News from the SVGM - August 15th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 15th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's mid-August, and in addition to piles of fresh tomatoes and sweet corn, now is the time to think about pre-ordering wild-caught Alaskan salmon! Steve and Jenn Kurian of Wild For Salmon will be joining us at the Growers' Market very soon, but now is your chance to stock up for the year by pre-ordering. This year, they've returned from Alaska with several types of salmon: portion-size salmon fillets; whole salmon fillets; and both hot-smoked and cold-smoked salmon. You can reach Wild For Salmon via email at wildforsalmon@yahoo.com, or by telephone at (570) 387-0550.

This week is also the time to pre-order Cornish hens from Beaver Run Farms, for pickup at the August 22nd market. They've been especially popular this year, without many, if any, extras for sale at the market. If you're interested in some hens this month, stop by to chat with Becky and Steve Forman, and be sure to check the newsletter and website next week for a recipe to put those little birds to good use.

At the market this week, in addition to the bounty of high summer, look for piles of fresh white and bicolor sweet corn from Dreisbach Greenhouses. They expect to bring plenty to the market this week, so now's the perfect time to stock up on corn and freeze it for Thanskgiving and those mid-winter meals when fresh, lo_SVGMcal produce is so hard to find. When the ears are fresh and sweet, you can try Grilled Corn with Lime and Chilli, which makes a great side dish for Tacos de Papa con Chorizo (Potato & Chorizo Tacos). (Both recipes are on the website.) And, if that's a bit spicy, try cooling off with some Agua Fresca de Pepino; scroll down for the recipe!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, August 15th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Green, yellow, purple, and roman snap beans
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Homemade dog treats
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Agua Fresca de Pepino (Cold Cucumber Drink)

Adapted from A Cook's Tour of Mexico by Nancy Zaslavsky (St. Martin's Griffin, 1997)
Makes about 3 quarts

Agua fresca, which translates as "fresh water," is a type of cool, refreshing beverage found throughout Mexico. They can be made from whatever is fresh and in season, though traditional flavors include hibiscus, tamarind, cucumber, and even rice, as in the classic horchata. Unlike fruit juice, these drinks are not supposed to be sweet, which keeps them refreshing in the summer heat without being cloying or heavy.

Aguas frescas are quite good with spicy foods, since they can take the edge off of an especially hot salsa. If need be, serve with a small server of simple syrup alongside for sweetening individual glasses, if tastes vary.

Ingredients:
  • 3 large cucumbers, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 7 limes, juiced (approximately ½ cup)
  • 3 quarts water
  • Pinch salt
  • Up to ½ cup simple syrup (See Note below.)
Directions:
  1. Put ½ cup water in a blender with 1 cup of chopped cucumbers, and blend. Add another cup of cucumber and blend again, repeating until all of the cucumbers have been blended.

  2. Strain the cucumber juice from the seeds and pulp, and pour into a large pitcher. Add the water, lime juice, and salt. Add simple syrup to taste, chill in the refrigerator, and stir well before serving.
Note: Simple syrup is just that. Bring equal parts water and sugar just to a boil in a saucepan, and allow to cool. Unlike granulated sugar, simple syrup dissolves immediately even in cold drinks. Use it sparingly, though; a little bit goes a long way.

* * * * *

On The Website
Corn, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes: they all originated in Central and South America, and when they're all in season, it seems entirely right to look to Mexico for dinner inspiration. This week, on the website, we have two Mexican recipes worth experimenting with: Grilled Corn with Lime and Chilli, a twist on the everyday buttered, salted corn; and Tacos de Papa con Chorizo (Potato & Chorizo Tacos), a classic recipe from the taquerias of Mexico City. Cut the heat with a pitcher of agua fresca, and enjoy the remaining weeks of summer.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, August 15th: Grilled Corn with Lime and Chilli

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Corn with Lime and Chilli

Serves 4 to 6

This recipe is about as simple as it can be, but the combination of sweet corn, sour lime, and spicy chilli is pretty tough to beat. When shucking the ears of corn, consider saving a few intact husks; they make wonderful wrappers for tamales and for wrapping fish and other meats for roasting and steaming.

Ingredients:

  • 6 ears fresh sweet corn
  • 1 lime, cut into 6 wedges
  • Ancho or chipotle chilli powder (or use sweet or hot paprika)
  • Bottled hot sauce (optional)
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill. Remove the husks and silks from the ears of corn, leaving the innermost layer to protect the corn from the grill's heat.

  2. Cook the ears over the hot coals, turning from time to time, for 10 to 15 minutes. Remove to a platter, and strip off the remaining husks. Rub each ear with a lime wedge, sprinkle with chilli powder and salt, and serve immediately with hot sauce and plenty of napkins alongside.

Bonus Recipe, August 15th: Tacos de Papa con Chorizo (Potato & Chorizo Tacos)

Seasonal Recipe
Tacos de Papa con Chorizo (Potato & Chorizo Tacos)

Adapted from A Cook's Tour of Mexico by Nancy Zaslavsky (St. Martin's Griffin, 1997)
Makes 8 tacos

Tacos can be made with just about anything at hand, from meats to fish to beans to potatoes, as in this recipe. If it can be folded into a pair of corn tortillas, and tastes good with a dash (or more) of hot sauce, you're on your way, which is one reason that tacos make such an excellent dinner for nights when time is tight. This recipe works well both with and without the chorizo, if you're looking for a vegetarian alternative.

You can make your own chorizo for this recipe with ground meat from the market; see the note below. It only takes a few minutes, and adds a great deal of flavor to this and other dishes.

Ingredients:

  • ½ lb. chorizo, loose (optional) (See Note below.)
  • 2 large white onions, chopped
  • 8 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 3 jalapeno peppers, cut into ¼-inch slices
  • 1 lb. potatoes, boiled until tender and diced
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 16 corn tortillas, warm
  • Cilantro, roughly chopped, for garnish
  • Vegetable oil or lard, for cooking
  • Hot sauces and salsas
Directions:
  1. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. If using chorizo, brown it in the skillet, and remove when it is finished cooking. Add more oil if necessary, and add the onion and garlic to the pan. Stirring occasionally, cook until the onions are limp, about 5 to 7 minutes, then add the jalapenos and cook for an additional 2 to 3 minutes.

  2. Add the diced potatoes to the pan, and stir occasionally. When the potatoes begin to brown, return the chorizo to the skillet and continue cooking, until everything has warmed through and the potatoes are turning nicely brown.

  3. To make a taco, place two tortillas on a plate, closely overlapping. Spoon an eighth of the mixture onto the tortillas, add a pinch of cilantro, and serve immediately. Provide hot sauce and salsa at the table for those who like a little extra spice in their meal.
Note:To make your own chorizo, mix together ground pork (or beef, or a combination) with spices: Per pound of ground meat, add ½ tablespoon kosher salt, 1 teaspoon ancho chilli powder, ½ teaspoon paprika, ½ teaspoon chipotle chilli powder, ½ teaspoon minced garlic, ½ teaspoon black pepper, ¼ teaspoon dried oregano, ¼ teaspoon cumin, and mix thoroughly to combine. Add 1 teaspoon each of tequila and red wine vinegar, and work until the sausage mixture fully absorbs the liquid, about a minute. Use immediately, or freeze for future recipes.

Thursday, August 7, 2008

News from the SVGM - August 8th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 8th, 2008
In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Whether pickled or fresh, roots or greens, beets are delicious, and food researchers suggest that they're particularly good for you, too. In addition to simply being a vegetable, which just about all of us could stand to eat more of, beets are chock full of the nutrients and other chemicals that help keep our bodies healthy. Enjoying beets is one way to keep your body's reserves of folate, manganese, and potassium high, and they're also a potent source of antioxidants in the form of chemicals called betalains. Martha Rose Shulman, of the New York Times, has even called them "The New Spinach." We have more about beets, including recipes for Chocolate Beet Cake and Beet Greens with White Beans, on the website this week.

This week, you can also look for fresh sweet corn, cucumbers, bell peppers and a new Salsa Verde from Haole Boy Salsas to spice up your cooking. And, with all of that summer corn, why not turn some of it into a Sweet Corn Risotto? Scroll down for the recipe!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com.

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, August 8th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Green, yellow, and roman snap beans
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Red beets
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant
  • Bell peppers
  • Summer squash and squash blossoms
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Homemade dog treats
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Sweet Corn "Risotto"

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma: Risotto by Kristine Kidd (Time-Life, 1998)
Serves 6

Not technically a risotto, since it uses no rice, this recipe is like a sophisticated yet simple take on creamed corn. It makes an excellent bed for grilled meats, from chicken to beef to shrimp, or a side dish for when the messiness of corn on the cob isn't quite appropriate.

Ingredients:
  • 18 ears fresh sweet corn, husked, silks removed
  • 6 tablespoons butter or olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 cups vegetable stock, chicken stock, or water
  • 6 jalapeno or serrano peppers, seeded and diced
  • 2 teaspoons ancho chilli powder
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle chilli powder (optional)
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Juice of a lime, or to taste
  • Fresh cilantro, to garnish
Directions:
  1. Cut the kernels from 6 ears of corn, and, with the back of a heavy knife, scrape along the cobs to get all of the juice. Grate the remaining ears on the coarse side of a box grater, collecting the shredded corn in a bowl with the cut kernels. Add the chilli powder, and stir to combine.

  2. In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter (or olive oil). Cook the onion and diced pepper until the onion turns translucent, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat slightly and add the corn and stock, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender and the mixture thickens, about 10 minutes. Stir in the lime juice, and taste for seasoning. Garnish with the cilantro, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Are plain old beets some sort of superfood? That's a lot to ask of any one vegetable, but they are surprisingly full of all sorts of nutrients, antioxidants, and more. And, to boot, they're really quite delicious, as recipes for Chocolate Beet Cake and Beet Greens with White Beans can attest. Learn a little more about beets and find those recipes on our website this week.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, August 8th: Chocolate Beet Cake

Whether pickled or fresh, roots or greens, beets are delicious, and food researchers suggest that they’re particularly good for you, too. In addition to simply being a vegetable, which just about all of us could stand to eat more of, beets are chock full of nutrients and other chemicals that help keep our bodies healthy. Enjoying beets is one way to keep your body’s reserves of folate, manganese, and potassium high, and they’re also a potent source of antioxidants in the form of chemicals called betalains. Martha Rose Shulman, of the New York Times, has even called them "The New Spinach."

Beets have been cultivated since at least 300 B.C.E., when early Greek writers such as Theophrastus made mention of them. The species, Beta vulgaris, actually includes four distinct forms: the beet (or sometimes beetroot), which is grown for its plump roots and greens; chard, which has no swollen root, but produces a crown of leaves and crisp stems; mangelwurzel (or mangoldwurzel), which is similar to the beet, but grown for livestock feed; and the sugar beet, which can contain up to 20% sucrose. These all descend from a Mediterranean plant called the sea beet, which is still sometimes harvested from the wild for its stems and greens. Centuries of careful selection have produced a wide variety of beets now available, from the familiar red beet to yellow beets, white beets, and even an Italian variety called Chioggia, which are striped beets with alternating rings of red and white.

Those colors are produced by two pigments in the beet, betacyanin (purplish-red) and betaxanthin (yellow). Unlike many other vegetable pigments, these chemicals don’t readily break down during cooking, which makes them very useful as edible food colorings. Even home cooks can put them to use, by juicing or pureeing cooked beets. A little goes a long way, as stained fingertips will attest, lending a dish of pasta or rice, for example, a brilliant reddish hue without overwhelming it with beet flavor.

Seasonal Recipe
Chocolate Beet Cake

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 10 to 12

Beets are absolutely delicious on their own, whether they're boiled, steamed, roasted or microwaved, but sometimes a surplus of beets can get tiresome for even the most diehard beet eater. When that time comes, here's a recipe that does better than your average zucchini bread. Rather than simply let the beets provide bulk for the cake, it matches their rich, earthy flavor with chocolate for a special dessert treat.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups shredded beets
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 4 eggs
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Grease a pair of 9-inch cake pans.

  2. Whisk together the dry ingredients: sugar, flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Using a double boiler, or over very low heat, melt the chocolate. Allow it to cool for several minutes, then mix the eggs and oil in thoroughly. In alternating scoops, add the chocolate mixture and the shredded beets to the dry ingredients, being careful not to overwork the mixture.

  3. Pour the batter into the prepared pans. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Allow to cool on a rack before removing from the pans.

Bonus Recipe, August 8th: Beet Greens with White Beans

Seasonal Recipe
Beet Greens with White Beans

Serves 2 to 4

Beet greens are quite similar to Swiss chard; they are, in fact, the same species. When looking for recipes, the two can always be interchanged, and can often substitute for spinach, kale, collards, and other greens, too. When you bring home a bunch of beets with greens intact, but off the greens, leaving about an inch of stem on the beets. Store the beets and greens separately; the beets will last for weeks, but the greens should be used within a few days. Wrap them tightly in plastic, or a damp towel, and keep them in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator until you have the time to cook them.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large bunch beet greens, chard, or other cooking greens
  • 1 cup cooked white beans
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¼ lb. bacon or pancetta, coarsely chopped (optional)
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • ½ cup water or stock
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional)
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Wash the beet greens and shake off any excess water. Trace along the edges between the ribs and the leaf surfaces with a knife, and separate into piles of stems and greens. Slice the stems into half-inch lengths. Coarsely chop the greens.

  2. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. If using the bacon, cook, stirring occasionally, until the pieces render out their fat and start becoming crisp. With a slotted spoon, remove the bacon from the pan. If there is a large amount of fat in the pan, remove all but a tablespoon; if there is less than that, of if you have omitted the bacon, add as much olive oil as needed.

  3. Add the beet stem, garlic, and crushed red pepper to the pan, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes minutes. Add the beet greens and cook until they have begun to wilt, then add the water, thyme, and beans. Cover and simmer until the greens are tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Return the bacon to the pan, check for seasoning, and serve immediately.