.

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Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

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Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, July 31, 2008

News from the SVGM - August 1st

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
August 1st, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
There are plenty of new things to find at the Growers' Market this week; after all, the heat that makes us all flee for the comfort of air conditioning is just what the crops of summer love. Now's the time when the tomatoes hang ripe and red – and sometimes yellow, green, or purple – on the vine, and each day brings the possibility of sweet corn and fresh peppers closer. In addition to the summer standards, you can look forward to finding a couple of special market treats this week. Roman beans, the delicious, wide-podded cousins of the green and wax beans are in season, as are all sorts of summer squash beyond the usual green zucchini. You can also expect tomatillos, a tomato-like fruit from Mexico that comes hidden in a papery skin. Brightly acidic, they're a great way to add zip to homemade salsas and sauces, like that in Pork Chops with Tomatillo Chilli Sauce, below.

Look for veal this week, too. Unlike commercially raised veal, which is raised in small cages to prevent the young calves from using their muscles, Stone Meadow Farms' veal calves spend their lives out on pasture, alongside their mothers. Young, and fed on their mothers' milk, these calves produce a fine, delicate veal with a rosy hue, the way veal used to be before factory farms and industrial agriculture. Tender and delicious, it's a special treat for meat lovers who may have qualms about the way supermarket meat is produced. It's a wonderful food, rarely seen nowadays, and a reminder that seasonal eating isn't just limited to vegetables.

This week also marks the beginning of local apple season for the Growers' Market, from MacNeal Orchards and Sugarbush. They'll be bringing Lodi apples on Friday, in addition to their delicious maple syrup. And, if just biting into a crisp, tart Lodi apple isn't enough, we also have a recipe for Baked Apples with Cheddar Cheese on our website.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, August 1st, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Handmade chicken and veggie pies, quiches, and pierogies
  • Freshly baked muffins
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Maple syrup
  • Apples
  • Tomatillos
  • Green, yellow, and roman snap beans
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Summer squash and squash blossoms
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised veal
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Homemade dog treats
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pork Chops with Tomatillo Chilli Sauce

Adapted from From Asparagus to Zucchini by The Madison Area Community Supported Agriculture Coalition (Jones Books, 2004)
Serves 4

Tomatillos, also known as husk tomatoes, are a cousin of the common garden tomato. They're best known as the central ingredient in the Mexican salsa verde, which usually mixes tomatillos with chilli peppers, onions, garlic, cilantro and lime juice. This recipe varies that formula slightly to create a flavorful sauce for flavoring pork chops; it would also be delicious for cooking chicken parts, dressing eggs, or even with a bowlful of tortilla chips.

Ingredients:
  • 4 pork chops
  • 1 cup white onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 4 jalapeno peppers, diced and, if desired, deseeded
  • 12 tomatillos, husks removed and coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, or ½ tablespoon dried
  • ½ tablespoon ancho chilli powder
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon oil or lard
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons sugar (optional)
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Season the pork chops with salt and pepper, and set aside while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium high heat, and brown the pork chops well on both sides. Remove the chops to a plate.

  2. Reduce the heat to medium. Add the onions and jalapenos to the skillet and cook for two minutes, then add the garlic. Cook for another five minutes, or until the onions and peppers are tender, and add the tomatillos, oregano, ancho powder, cumin, and cinnamon to the pan. Simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the tomatillos have broken down and the sauce has a nice texture. Taste and adjust the seasoning as needed. If the sauce is too tart, add the sugar to cut the acidity.

  3. Return the pork chops to the skillet, burying them in the sauce. Cover and simmer until the chops are cooked through, about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
It's August, and there's delicious food all about! Some of it doesn't require much (if any cooking) - after all, a fresh tomato salad's hard to top - but every so often it's nice to change things up. Check out our website for a recipe for Baked Apples with Cheddar Cheese, which turns fresh apples into a savory side dish.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, August 1st: Baked Apples with Cheddar Cheese

Seasonal Recipe
Baked Apples with Cheddar Cheese

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 6 to 8

Apples make wonderful desserts, and they're always good for eating out of hand. Sometimes, though, it's nice to change things up and put their natural sweet and sour flavor to use in a savory dish. This recipe is a variation on the idea of baked apples with cinnamon and brown sugar, and makes a great side dish. It's best with firm, sour apples, but any you like will do. Same goes for the cheese.

Ingredients:

  • 6 medium apples
  • 3 tablespoons butter, melted
  • ¼ cup water or apple cider
  • 1 cup port, red wine, or more apple cider
  • 1-½ cups grated cheddar cheese
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Grease a 9 x 13 or similarly sized pan with 1 tablespoon of the butter.

  2. Cut the apples in half and remove the seeds and core with a melon baller. Place them in the pan, cut side down, and drizzle the remaining butter over them. Pour the apple cider ov top, and place in the oven. Bake until they just begin to become tender, about 15 to 20 minutes.

  3. Turn the apples over, pour over the port, and baste with some of the pan juices. Fill each apple with the grated cheese, and sprinkle with the thyme, salt, and pepper. Return to the oven and bake until the cheese is bubbly and the apples are tender, another 15 to 20 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature, with the pan juices at the side.

Thursday, July 24, 2008

News from the SVGM - July 25th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 25th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The weather's hot, and the tomatoes - and the squash, and the beans, and all those crops that love the hot weather - are ripening and appearing at the market. We're also expecting to see more blueberries this week, so now's the time to stop in and stock up if you haven't already. And, of course, we have some new recipes to help you put this week's market goodies to good use: Spicy Dry-cooked Green Beans (in both vegetarian and omnivore versions) in the newsletter, and an Austrian recipe for Chicken with Sour Cream on the website.

This Friday, the market also features live music from Sabrina Kirby and Judy Ellis, performing hammered dulcimer duets. It is unusual enough to hear one of these beautiful instruments, and quite a treat to hear two of them played together. Sabrina and Judy, both from Lewisburg, share taking the leads and doing backup on a varied set list, from Bach and O'Carolan to old-time fiddle/dance tunes, to a contemporary hammered dulcimer composition, and more!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, July 25th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
  • Green beans
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Blueberries
  • Summer squash and squash blossoms
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Homemade dog treats
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Spicy Dry-cooked Green Beans

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma: Asian by Farina Wong Kingsley (Simon & Schuster, 2003)
Serves 4 to 6

Traditionally, this recipe is made with long beans, also known as snake beans or yard-long beans. Pencil-thin, they often reach a foot in length, sometimes literally reaching a full yard. Though similar to green beans, both in taste and use, they are a different species, though usually interchangeable in recipes. Here, they are stir-fried and sauced with a pungent, spicy mixture. The addition of a small amount of pork adds another level of flavor, but can be omitted for a vegetarian version, as can the fish sauce.

If you don't have a few of the more unusual ingredients, there's no reason you can't make a variation on this recipe with what you have at home. Chinese black vinegar is a smoky vinegar made from grain, but any vinegar you like will do. Fish sauce is a southeast Asian condiment made from anchovies, but can be omitted or replaced with soy sauce. Like soy sauce, it's quite salty, and often limits the use of crystal salt in recipes. Sichuan peppercorns (also spelled Szechuan, Szechwan, or various other ways) are a spice used in various Asian cuisines. They have an intensely floral aroma, as well as the unusual effect of numbing the mouth. Combined with the heat of chilli peppers, this produces the traditional ma-la flavor of Sichuan food.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. green beans, trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons peanut or canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese black vinegar (substitute balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon hot sauce
  • ½ teaspoon cornstarch (optional, for a thick, glossy sauce)
  • ¼ teaspoon sugar
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons spring onions, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • ¼ lb. pork, ground or finely chopped (optional)
  • ½ tablespoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 2 teaspoons Sichuan peppercorns, toasted and ground
  • Salt to taste
Directions:
  1. Mix together the sauce ingredients in a bowl: water, vinegar, soy sauce, fish sauce, tomato paste, hot sauce, sugar, Sichuan peppercorns, and cornstarch, if using. Stir to make a slurry; you will need to stir again before adding to the pan to prevent the cornstarch from forming lumps.

  2. In a wok or other large pan over high heat, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil a haze forms above it. Add the beans and stir-fry until they begin to blister and char, about 7 to 10 minutes. Remove the beans to a bowl. Add the remaining oil to the pan and add the garlic, spring onions, ginger, and red pepper flakes and stir-fry until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add the pork, if using, and cook until opaque, 2 to 3 minutes.

  3. Return the beans to the pan and cook for minute to heat through. Pour the sauce over the beans and stir until it reduces and thickens, another 2 to 3 minutes. Taste for seasoning; the soy sauce and fish sauce may make salting unnecessary. Serve immediately, with plenty of boiled rice.
* * * * *

On The Website
Looking for a new way to cook up a fresh chicken from the market? Stop by the website for an Austrian-style recipe for Chicken with Sour Cream, a great dish to go alongside a multicolored array of fresh potatoes. And if you're the sort who's never cut apart a chicken before, we have a couple of videos to show you how. It's quick and easy, a good way to save money, and lets you keep the unusual leftovers - the bones and neck and all of that - to make a delicious homemade chicken stock.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, July 25th: Chicken with Sour Cream

Seasonal Recipe
Chicken with Sour Cream

Adapted from European Peasant Cookery by Elisabeth Luard (Grub Street, 2004)
Serves 4 to 6

This recipe is adapted from a traditional way of preparing rabbit and hare in Austria and the surrounding regions, called Hasenbraten mit Rahmsauce. Marinating game, sometimes for several days, helps tenderize the meat and reduce the gaminess. For a market chicken, it's a good way to introduce some delicious flavor. This recipe calls for a chicken to be cut into pieces before cooking. If you've never done it before, or are feeling a bit rusty, we've included some videos on the website to show you how.

Ingredients:

  • 1 chicken, cut into individual pieces
  • 1 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1 cup water
  • 1-½ tablespoons kosher salt (reduce the amount slightly if using granulated)
  • ½ tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon juniper berries, lightly crushed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • ¼ lb. bacon, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 medium-sized onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced
  • ½ tablespoon fresh thyme or marjoram, or to taste
  • 2 oz. fresh mushrooms, sliced (optional)
  • 1 cup sour cream, or to taste
  • 1 cup water, or as needed
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. In a pot, mix together the vinegar, wine, water, salt, sugar, peppercorns, juniper, and bay leaves, and bring just to the boil, stirring to dissolve the salt and sugar. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. Pour over the chicken, being sure that all of the meat is in contact with the marinade; a zip-top plastic bag with the air squeezed out works well. Refrigerate and marinate for two hours.

  2. Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat dry. In a large, lidded pan, cook the bacon over medium to medium-high heat until the fat renders out and it just starts to brown. Remove the bacon from the pan and add the chicken, browning the pieces on both sides. Do this in batches, if necessary, to avoid crowding the pan. Remove the chicken pieces to a plate.

  3. Add the onions, carrots, and mushrooms to the pan, and cook until the onions turn translucent. Add a cup of water and scrape the bottom of the pan to release any flavorful brown bits. Return the chicken and bacon to the pan and cover tightly, cooking until tender, 45 minutes to an hour and a half, depending on the size of the chicken pieces. Check from time to time and add additional water as needed.

  4. Remove the chicken pieces to a serving dish, and turn off the heat. Stir the sour cream into the remaining cooking liquid, check for seasoning, and serve with the chicken.

How To Cut Up A Chicken

Cutting a chicken into parts is a relatively quick and easy process. For those who've never had the opportunity before, here are a collection of videos showing several different methods. There are about as many ways of cutting up a bird as you can imagine, and once you get the basic technique down, it's easy to adjust the process to get the cuts you need.

What makes learning this a valuable skill is the fact that pre-cut parts always cost more than the whole bird. The pre-cut, pre-packaged chicken pieces at the grocery store really lack the flavor and texture of a good, pasture-raised bird, like those available at the growers' market each week. It also lets you save the leftover pieces of the chicken that would otherwise be wasted. Keep the chicken backs, necks, wingtips, and other bits of meat and bone in bags in the freezer, and use them to make stock when you have the time.

The videos below show a handful of different ways of cutting up a chicken. None are difficult, and all are easy enough to master with a little practice.









There you go: how to cut up a chicken. It's simple, less expensive than buying the pieces pre-cut, and takes just a few minutes. Use those parts immediately, or wrap tightly and freeze for dinners down the line.

Thursday, July 17, 2008

News from the SVGM - July 18th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 18th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
The growers' market isn't just a place to find all of the good, local food you're used to; it's also where you can go to try something new and unusual. From vegetables and herbs to less common - but no less delicious - cuts of meat, there's always something new worth looking for. Some weeks, it's a chance to try a variation on something familiar, such as the heirloom summer squashes you can expect to find this Friday. Other times, it's something quite unusual, like pork jowls.

Sure, it may sound a little strange, but the pork jowl - the cheek muscle - is amazingly rich and flavorful. Traditionally, it ends up in a wide variety of rustic dishes, from scrapple to headcheese to guanciale, an Italian cured meat similar to pancetta. (It even makes an extraordinary smoked bacon.) For a simpler way to use this inexpensive, delicious cut, you can try your favorite slow-cooking method, from braising to slow-roasting. This week, we're providing a recipe for Pork Jowl with Tomatoes and Polenta to as just one example. Try it, and you'll understand why pork jowls are a favorite among chefs across the country.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, July 18th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Summer squash and squash blossoms
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Handmade chicken and veggie pies, quiches, and pierogies
  • Freshly baked muffins
  • Salsas and barbecue sauces
  • Hot sauces and flavored salts
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pork Jowl with Tomatoes and Polenta

Serves 6 to 8

Because it's so rich and full of flavor, a pork jowl can easily be stretched to feed more people with less meat, making it perfect for a crowd. You can, of course, adjust the quantity of meat in this recipe to suit your taste: more for a richer dish, with the jowl meat as the centerpiece; less if you just want to use it as an accent, or if extra guests stop by. If you have extra meat, save it to use an a burst of extra flavor in other dishes, such as a pasta sauce or a risotto.

This recipe takes advantage of the pork's long cooking time to roast some tomatoes, which gives them a fantastically rich, sweet flavor. If you have too many tomatoes, go ahead and roast more than you need; like the pork, they're potent and even a little bit can enliven all sorts of other dishes. Nothing in this recipe takes much actual affort, though it does take a good bit of time to cook. So sit back, relax with a cold beverage, and enjoy the aromas that slowly fill the kitchen and, eventually, the entire house.

Ingredients:
  • 1 fresh pork jowl, about 1-¼ lbs.
  • 2 lbs. tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary or thyme, plus more to taste (optional)
  • 2 cups polenta or coarse cornmeal
  • 8 cups water, milk, or a combination
  • 1 cup grated cheese
  • 4 tablespoons butter (optional)
  • 1 cup fresh basil, loosely packed
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Rub the pork jowl all over with salt, pepper, and the fresh rosemary or thyme, and place, fat side up, in an oven-proof skillet (such as cast iron). Cover tightly with aluminum foil, and place in the oven to roast. Roast for about 4 hours.

  2. Meanwhile, prepare the tomatoes for roasting. Core all but bite-size tomatoes, and slice. Plum tomatoes should be cut in half; large beefsteak tomatoes should be cut into several pieces about that size; grape and cherry-sized tomatoes may be left whole. Arrange on a baking rack set over a baking sheet, and sprinkle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Allow to rest as the pork continues to cook.

  3. To prepare the polenta, bring several inches of water to a boil in the bottom of a double boiler, then reduce the heat. In the top of the double boiler, over direct heat, bring the 8 cups of water (or milk) to a boil. Whisk in the polenta with a bit of salt, and stir until the consistency evens out. Transfer to over the simmering water, cover, and allow to cook for 1-½ hours. Give a stir every so often, and check to make sure that the simmering pot doesn't run dry. When it is cooked, reduce the heat to very low, and keep covered until just before serving.

  4. After 3 hours of roasting the pork, add the tomatoes to the oven. They should finish at approximately the same time as the pork jowl, though you may wish to check on each as they get closer to done. When the pork and tomatoes have finished cooking - the pork should be tender, and will have rendered out a good amount of its fat; the tomatoes will have begun to caramelize - remove from the oven. If you prefer a browned top to the jowl, you can slide it under the broiler for a few minutes, though this is optional.

  5. While the pork rests, uncover the polenta and stir in the cheese and butter. Scoop into bowls, and top with slices or cubes of roasted pork and the caramelized tomatoes. Garnish liberally with torn basil and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Looking for some vegetables to accompany a heart dish of pork jowl? Consider trying some of the delicious, multicolored summer squash available at the market. They're good sauteed in a little butter or olive oil, cooked up on the grill, or even pickled, of course, but you can also try them in a Summer Squash Salad. When they're young and tender, it's a shame to hide that sweet, nutty flavor in a zucchini bread.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, July 18th: Summer Squash Salad

Seasonal Recipe
Summer Squash Salad

Adapted from a recipe by Russ Parsons, food writer for the Los Angeles Times
Serves 4 to 6

When they're still small, summer squash are a real treat. For a vibrantly colored summer salad, try making this with a mixture of the varieties available at the market, from cocozelles to patty pans to zucchini. The trick with this salad is the salting, which softens the squash pieces and eliminates the sometimes bitter edge when raw. When there's more available at market, try combining this with cucumbers, tomatoes, and other vegetables for a very simple and delightful side dish.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ lb. summer squash
  • Juice of a lemon
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • ¼ cup pine nuts or chopped walnuts
  • A handful of fresh basil or mint
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the squash into ¼-inch-thick slices, then into smaller bite-size pieces if necessary. Put the slices into a colander, salt liberally, and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes.

  2. Meanwhile, smash the garlic cloves with the back of a heavy knife. Peel away the skin and put in a cold skillet with the olive oil. Place over medium-low heat until the edges of the garlic start to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat, discard the garlic (or use in another dish) and allow to cool.

  3. Rinse the squash slices well, and pat dry. Toss in a bowl with the lemon juice, garlic oil, pepper and additional salt to taste. Sprinkle with the nuts and torn basil or mint leaves, and serve immediately.

Thursday, July 10, 2008

News from the SVGM - July 11th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 11th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Well, we're back to normal this Friday at the Growers' Market, and there's more and more to find each week as the seasons change. Expect plenty of blueberries this week, as well as new produce, herbs, and more as the weather warms. For some recipe ideas, don't forget to stop by our website; you can search through the recipes posted from earlier newsletters by using the archives in the sidebar or by typing into the search bar at the top. This week, we have recipes for Seua Rong Hai (Thai Grilled Beef), Nahm Jeem Seua Rong Hai (Spicy Thai Dipping Sauce), and Blueberry Pound Cake!

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, July 11th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Green beans
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Hot sausage sandwiches
  • Handmade chicken and veggie pies, quiches, and pierogies
  • Freshly baked muffins
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Seua Rong Hai (Thai Grilled Beef)

Adapted from Real Thai by Nancie McDermott (Chronicle, 1992)
Serves 4

A combination of sweet, salty, and - with its dipping sauce - spicy, this simple Thai beef preparation is a great appetizer when grilling out for a crowd. It cooks quickly over hot coals, and can be served hot or warm while the rest of the meal finishes cooking. The name, seua rong hai, literally means "as the tiger weeps." It refers to the drips of beef fat that fall onto the coals while cooking. Traditionally, this is served with Nahm Jeem Seua Rong Hai, a spicy, highly flavored dipping sauce, and sticky rice, which serves as a soothing complement to its bold flavors. A pile of fresh basil leaves would be an appropriate touch, too. For the dipping sauce recipe, stop by our website.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. beef rib-eye (with some fat), or flank steak
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
Directions:
  1. In a nonreactive container large enough to hold the beef, mix together the soy sauce, fish sauce, and sugar, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add the beef and marinate for an hour, turning occasionally. (This is a great time to prepare the dipping sauce.)

  2. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill. When the fire is hot to medium-hot, remove the beef from the marinade and cook, flipping half way through, until the center is medium-rare. Depending on the heat of the grill and the thickness of the meat, this may take from 5 to 10 minutes. Occasional drips of fat may flare up; this part of the charm of the dish.

  3. When the meat is ready, transfer to a platter. Allow to rest for a few minutes, then cut into thin slices. Serve hot or warm with nahm jeem seua rong hai and sticky rice.
* * * * *

On The Website
To go with this week's newsletter recipe for Thai Grilled Beef, we have the traditional accompanying dipping sauce, Nahm Jeem Seua Rong Hai. Together, they make a great appetizer when cooking a meal on the grill. For dessert, then, why not try out a Blueberry Pound Cake, which makes for a delicious end to a meal, or a special breakfast treat the next day.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, July 11th: Nahm Jeem Seua Rong Hai (Dipping Sauce for Thai Grilled Beef)

Seasonal Recipe
Nahm Jeem Seua Rong Hai (Dipping Sauce for Thai Grilled Beef)

Adapted from Real Thai by Nancie McDermott (Chronicle, 1992)
Makes about 1/3 cup

When grilling up beef as they do in Thailand, it's only fitting to accompany it with this sharp and fiery sauce. Since personal preferences for heat vary, take this as a rough template, and adjust the proportions to suit your taste. This is intended to be intensely flavored, which helps offset the richness of the beef; tame the heat and saltiness with sticky rice, boiled potatoes, or another soothing starch.

Ingredients:

  • 5 small, dried red chillis
  • ¼ cup fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon sugar (palm sugar, if you have it)
  • 1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon dry short grain rice
  • 2 small green onions, thinly sliced
Directions:
  1. In a skillet over high heat, toast the rice grains until they turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Shake the pan frequently to color them evenly and avoid burning. Set aside to cool, then grind to a powder in a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder.

  2. Over medium-low heat, toss the chillis in the same skillet, until they begin to darken. A few black spots are a good thing, but take care to avoid burning them, shaking the pan frequently. Set aside to cool. When cool enough to handle, de-stem the chillis and cut each crosswise into several pieces. In a mortar, grind into a coarse powder; flakes of chilli and seeds should be visible.

  3. In a small bowl, stir together the fish sauce, lime juice, soy sauce, and sugar until the sugar dissolves. Taste and adjust as necessary. Stir in the rice powder, chillis, and green onions, and serve immediately.

Bonus Recipe, July 11th: Blueberry Pound Cake

Seasonal Recipe
Blueberry Pound Cake

Adapted from How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1998)

Blueberries, with their sweetness and acidity, go well in all sorts of baked goods, from cobblers and pies to pancakes and waffles. For a twist on the usual, try baking them into a pound cake. It works both as dessert and as breakfast - even as one, then the other. Serve it with fresh blueberries and whipped cream when you can, or freeze some of the summer's berries and enjoy a pound cake any time throughout the year.

Ingredients:

  • ½ lb. (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened, plus extra for greasing the pan
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch salt
  • ½ teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9x5-inch loaf pan. In a bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, and cinnamon until well combined.

  2. Using an electric mixer, cream together the butter and sugar until the mixture lightens in color and appears fluffy. One at a time, beat in the egg yolks, beating the mixture smooth before each addition.

  3. By hand, mix in the dry ingredients, working until it just comes together; do not overmix. Add the vanilla and stir until blended.

  4. In a clean bowl, whisk the egg whites until they hold soft peaks. Fold them into the batter, one third of the egg whites at a time. Once combined, gently fold in the blueberries, and pour the mixture into the prepared loaf pan.

  5. Bake for about an hour and 15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the cake comes out clean. Allow to rest in the pan for 5 minutes before turning out on a rack to cool completely. Store at room temperature, covered in wax paper for a day or two; it will keep longer if wrapped in plastic, though the texture may suffer a bit.

Thursday, July 3, 2008

News from the SVGM - July 4th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
July 4th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's the 4th of July this weekend, and a great time to get outside and celebrate our nation's independence. Traditions may vary, but there are always a few standards: good friends and good food; fireworks and fireflies. This week at the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market, you can find plenty of delicious food to keep those friends well-fed and happy waiting for the nighttime light shows to begin.

This week, some of our regular vendors will be lining up from noon until 2:30pm to meet your holiday grilling needs. There will be meats and cheeses, vegetables and fresh flowers for that red, white, and blue (and green) centerpiece. This is a perfect chance to try out some richly flavored burgers and hot dogs from grass-fed beef, or pork chops and sausages fresh from local farms. What better way to celebrate our nation's birthday than by buying wholesome food from your neighbors, farmers whose faces you know and whose handshakes you can trust?

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, July 4th, 2008
12pm - 2:30pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Onions and garlic
  • New potatoes
  • Farm fresh eggs
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Farm-fresh pork
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps and bath accessories
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Hot sausage sandwiches
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Potato Salad with Vinaigrette

Adapted from European Peasant Cookery by Elisabeth Luard (Grub Street, 2004)
Serves 4 to 6

Potato salad may not be a universal summer side dish, though it sure seems that way, especially around Independence Day. Now that little new potatoes are finding their way to the market, it's time to consider turning them into a classic potato salad. Here's just one possibility, a bright, herbal dish that's immensely satisfying. And if a mayonnaise-enriched version is more to your taste, stop by our website for more potato salad possibilities!

Ingredients:
  • 2 lb. small new potatoes
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon or other good mustard
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 or 4 slices of day-old crusty bread, such as baguette or sourdough, cut into small cubes
  • 1 garlic clove, skinned and crushed
  • 1 bunch spring onions or scallions
  • 1 glass white wine
  • Fresh summer savory, thyme, or other herbs, to taste
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Bring a pot of well-salted water to boil. Scrub the potatoes and add them to the boiling water, cooking for 15 to 20 minutes, or until just soft.

  2. While the potatoes are cooking, mix together the mustard, oil, vinegar, garlic and bread in a large bowl. Trim the spring onions, slice thinly, and add to the rest.

  3. When the potatoes are ready, drain thoroughly. While still warm, slice them roughly, keeping the skin, and add to the bowl. Pour in the wine, add the black pepper, and turn it all over together, taking care not to mash the potato pieces. Turn over from time to time as it cools, allowing the potatoes to soak up the liquid.
* * * * *

On The Website
There are options aplenty for potato salad this holiday weekend, and we have more recipes worth trying on our website. Stop by for Potato Salad with Mayonnaise; Potato Salad with Green Beans and Hard-Cooked Eggs; and even a recipe for unbelievably delicious Homemade Mayonnaise!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, July 4th: Potato Salad with Mayonnaise

Seasonal Recipe
Potato Salad with Mayonnaise

Adapted from How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1998)
Serves 4 to 6

Mark Bittman refers to this as "Classic American Potato Salad," and it's a simple, delicious side dish for any meal cooked out on the grill. This is also a great template recipe, into which you can incorporate whatever you and your family and guests would enjoy. Fresh herbs make a good start, and you can feel free to add hard-cooked eggs, crumbled bacon, roasted red peppers, or whatever's handy and sounds good. It's hard to go wrong.

Making this with Homemade Mayonnaise really makes a world of difference in flavor; see below for that recipe. If you just don't have time for that, try purchasing the best true mayonnaise you can find, rather than a sweet sandwich spread like Miracle Whip, and whisk in a little lemon juice to taste. It won't be as good and eggy as homemade, but the extra tartness is definitely a step in the right direction.

Ingredients:

  • 1-½ lbs. waxy or new potatoes
  • ½ cup minced fresh parsley
  • ¼ cup minced onion
  • Mayonnaise to taste (start with ½ cup), preferably homemade
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Wash and scrub the potatoes well; peel them if you prefer. Cut into bite-size pieces and cook in the water until tender but still firm, not mushy, about 15 minutes. Drain, rinse briefly with cold water, then drain again.

  2. While still warm, toss the potatoes with the onion and parsley. Add mayonnaise to your taste, and season with salt and pepper. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Bonus Recipe, July 4th: Potato Salad with Green Beans and Hard-Cooked Eggs

Seasonal Recipe
Potato Salad with Green Beans and Hard-Cooked Eggs

Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)
Serves 10 to 12

Though this potato salad recipe is more involved than the other two offered this week, it is a great way to make an often unremarkable side dish into something visually appealing and quite appetizing. This recipe may be made ahead and kept refrigerated, but it's especially good while still warm. If you're able to prepare it at the last minute, it becomes a special treat.

Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs. waxy or new potatoes
  • 1 large red onion, finely diced
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ½ lb. green beans, trimmed and cut into bite-size pieces
  • 4 hard-cooked eggs, cut into quarters
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 3 large cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 3 tablespoons capers, rinsed
  • 1 bell pepper, finely diced
  • 4 celery ribs, finely diced
  • 3 tablespoons fresh marjoram, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Put the diced onion in a strainer. Bring a kettle of water to a boil, and pour slowly over the onion. Shake the onion dry and add to a large salad bowl. Add the vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt, some black pepper, and the olive oil.

  2. Cook the potatoes in boiling, salted water, then peel and slice. While still warm, add to the bowl with the onions, along with the mustard, garlic and capers. Toss gently, taking care not to break up the potato slices. Add the bell pepper, celery, and herbs, and toss again. Check and adjust the seasoning as necessary.

  3. While the potatoes are cooking, boil the green beans in salted water until tender, 2 to 4 minutes, depending on their size. Drain and rinse under cold water, then toss with a little olive oil. Arrange the green beans on top of the potato salad, along with the egg quarters, spooning some of the salad dressing over the egg yolks to keep them moist. Serve immediately or refrigerate until serving.

Bonus Recipe, July 4th: Homemade Mayonnaise

Seasonal Recipe
Homemade Mayonnaise

Adapted from Charcuterie by Ruhlman and Polcyn (Norton, 2005)
Makes 1 cup

Sure, you can buy mayonnaise in any grocery store, but the fresh, homemade version is so much tangier and more flavorful, you'll want to use it in so many more places than just as a simple sandwich spread. The key here is to use a flavorful farm fresh egg and a neutral oil. Mayonnaise can be made with olive oil, which is quite delicious, but it "goes crazy," as the Italians say. If you insist on using olive oil, be sure to use it all within a few hours; it may not last until the next day.

If your emulsion breaks, all is not lost. Start with a new yolk and fresh oil to get another emulsion started, then slowly add in the broken mayonnaise. Take it slowly, adding just a few drops of oil to start, add the rest in no more than a thin stream, and you should have the best mayonnaise you've ever had in no time. Should the thought of all this whisking put you off, you an also make mayonnaise in a food processor or a blender, though you may need to double or triple the recipe to ensure that there is enough liquid in the bowl when the emulsion is starting.

Ingredients:

  • 1 egg yolk
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, strained of pulp
  • 1 cup neutral vegetable oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper (optional)
  • Fresh minced herbs, finely minced garlic, or other flavorings (optional, but highly recommended)
Directions:
  1. Combine the yolk, salt, pepper, water, and a few drops of lemon juice in a medium bowl. Whisk the ingredients together.

  2. Transfer the oil to a container that can pour a wire-thin stream; the squeeze bottles used to hold ketchup and mustard in an old-fashioned diner work especially well. While whisking vigorously, add the oil, starting with just a few drops at a time. As the emulsion forms, and the mixture starts to look creamy, you can increase the oil addition to a thin stream. Continue whisking until all of the oil is incorporated.

  3. When the emulsion is finished, it should be thick enough to hold its shape, though you can thin it to your taste with the additional lemon juice or water. The tartness of the lemon helps offset the richness of the mayonnaise, which is one reason this version ends up so much tastier than anything in a jar.