.

Welcome!

Welcome to the website for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market!

Want to receive our newsletter?
For a regular reminder in your email inbox, sign up for our email newsletter. Just send an email to svgmarket@gmail.com.

We're on Facebook!
Look on our Facebook page for updates as we have them!

Looking for recipes?
Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, May 29, 2008

News from the SVGM - May 30th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
May 30th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
  • In Our Community
* * * * *

News From The Market
The Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market is a great place to find fresh, local ingredients for a wonderful meal. It's also where you can find wholesome, delicious food for those days when it's a little too nice to be standing inside the kitchen. From lunchtime snacks to ready-to-heat meals, there are plenty of choices every Friday afternoon.

What sets the market's food apart from most anyplace else is the fact that a meal there is as fresh and local as the produce itself, because it's often one and the same. Anyone looking for a meal while shopping can pick up a hot sausage sandwich from Beaver Run Farm; fresh off the grill, it's the same sausages that you can buy to take home, made from their own pasture-raised pork. Emma's Food For Life, the Selinsgrove restaurant that emphasizes local and organic food, sets up each week with a changing selection of sandwiches, wraps, freshly baked breads and more.

And should the thought of preparing a meal from scratch in the kitchen seem too much when the air is warm and the sun is shining, there is always the opportunity to pick up a handmade chicken pie, pierogies, or a salmon quiche from Gobbie's. It's as good as homemade, but without the kitchen to clean up afterward. Yes, Gobbie's will be back this Friday, for all you who missed those pies and pierogies last week.

Keep an eye out for Macneal Orchards & Sugarbush, too; they'll be by with several varieties of delicious, real maple syrup. For a Sunday brunch treat, try it with the recipe below for Whole Wheat Maple Crepes. With a little bacon or sausage, some farm-fresh eggs, and a salad of spring greens, you can make an easy, elegant meal.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, May 30th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Spring onions and leeks
  • Tender spring lettuces and greens
  • Asparagus
  • Hothouse tomatoes
  • Whole-grain breads, rolls, and pitas
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised pork
  • Salsas, hot sauces, and flavored salts
  • Barbecue sauces
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Bedding plants and hanging baskets, from flowers to tomatoes to herbs and other vegetable seedlings
  • Maple syrup
  • Fresh sandwiches and other lunch items
  • Hot sausage sandwiches
  • Handmade pies, including chicken, broccoli chicken & cheese, veggie, and salmon quiche
  • Pierogies: salmon; roasted red pepper, chicken & cheese; potato, cheese & bacon; and potato & cheese
  • Muffins: blueberry streusel and blackberry cheese streusel
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Whole Wheat Maple Crepes

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Makes about a dozen

There's nothing that can compare to the flavor of real maple syrup, but it doesn't need to be limited to just topping pancakes. Here's a recipe for sweet crepes, lightly flavored with maple syrup. (You can, of course, add as much more as you like at the table.) Try them filled with a little sweetened ricotta, or with a bit of jam or stewed fruit. If you aren't planning to eat them right away, stack the crepes with waxed paper in between the layers, and refrigerate overnight, or freeze for up to a month.

Ingredients:
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons milk (or water)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more for greasing the pan
  • 2 tablespoons real maple syrup
  • Pinch salt
Directions:
  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor, and process until smooth. Alternately, you can whisk them together by hand, being sure to combine thoroughly. Cover and allow to stand for at least thirty minutes, or even overnight, to allow the flour to absorb the liquid; this will keep the final crepes tender.

  2. Heat a nonstick pan over medium heat, and coat lightly with butter. Before cooking each crepe, stir the batter, and add about 2 tablespoons to the pan. Lift the pan and rotate so that the batter forms an even, thin layer. Cook until the top sets and the underside is golden brown, then flip and cook a few moments until the second side browns. Serve immediately, or else let cool, wrap tightly, and freeze for later.
* * * * *

On The Website
Stop by the website for some pictures from last week's market, including some of KJ Wagner and Kimbo performing in the gazebo. The weather was lovely last week, and it looks like there's more sun and warmth on the way.

There's also a recipe on the web for Linguine with Asparagus and Spring Herbs; enjoy the local asparagus while it's in season!

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

In Our Community
There will be a benefit concert on Sunday, June 1st to raise funds for the victims of the recent earthquake in China. Traditionally the day on which the Chinese people celebrate Children's Day, local children will give their talents in a show of support. All donations will be sent to the American Red Cross' Chinese Relief Fund. For more details, please contact Rebekah Liu Smith at (570) 538-9708.

Children's Benefit Concert
Sunday, June 1st
2:00 - 3:30pm
Watsontown Alliance Church, 1165 8th St.
Watsontown, PA

Bonus Recipe, May 30th: Linguine with Asparagus and Spring Herbs

Seasonal Recipe
Linguine with Asparagus and Spring Herbs

Serves 4 to 6
Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone by Deborah Madison (Broadway, 1997)

For those who love asparagus, it's a rare meal that couldn't be improved by the addition of a few (or more) stalks. Fresh, homemade egg noodles make for a special treat, but this recipe is delicious with your favorite dried pasta, too. When preparing the asparagus, be sure to save all of the tough ends; though tough, they can be used to lend flavor to an asparagus soup, then strained out.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb. asparagus, tough ends removed
  • 1 bunch spring onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 lb. linguine; use a fresh egg pasta, if available
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme, sage, or tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons chives
  • 4 tablespoon pine nuts, or chopped walnuts
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, to taste
Directions:
  1. Place a large pot of salted water over high heat. While the pasta water is heating, warm a wide skillet with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil over low heat. Add the spring onions, lemon zest, thyme/sage/tarragon and a little salt and pepper. Cook slowly, stirring from time to time.

  2. Meanwhile, slice the tips from the asparagus. Cut the remaining stalks diagonally. When the water comes to a boil, add the asparagus and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Scoop it out and add to the pan with the spring onions, and continue to cook the vegetables.

  3. Cook the pasta until done; drain and add to the vegetables. Add some of the pasta cooking water if the pan appears dry. Raise the heat to medium, and add the remaining oil, nuts, and chives. Season to taste. Divide among serving dishes, topping each with a little grated cheese, and serve immediately.

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Pictures from the SVGM - May 23rd

A warm, sunny day at the tail end of spring. It's a grand time to be outside, enjoying the market and some live music. Below are a few pictures from the SVGM on May 23rd:


Shoppers enjoying the good weather and good food.


Kerry Hoffman of Clara's Meadow and her flowers and herbs.


Fresh produce from Willianna Farm.


Cheesemaker Brian Futhey of Stone Meadow Farm takes a break.


Just some of the salsas available from Haole Boy Salsas.


Emma's Food For Life offers a selection of fresh breads and tasty lunch items.


KJ Wagner and Kimbo, performing in Hufnagle Park.


KJ Wagner and Kimbo, performing in Hufnagle Park.


KJ Wagner and Kimbo, performing in Hufnagle Park.


KJ Wagner and Kimbo, performing in Hufnagle Park.


KJ Wagner, performing in Hufnagle Park.


Kimbo, performing in Hufnagle Park.

Thursday, May 22, 2008

News from the SVGM - May 23rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
May 23rd, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Despite last Friday's chilly temperatures and incessant rain, the vendors were ready and in good spirits in Hufnagle Park. Yes, spring is here, and summer can't be far off. In fact, it's looking as though the upcoming Memorial Day weekend might even be warm and sunny and perfect for that outdoor barbecue.

It also gives us a second chance to enjoy an afternoon with Lewisburg's Community Arts & Music Series, which is bringing local singer/songwriters KJ Wagner and Kimbo to the gazebo in Hufnagle Park. They'll be performing a variety of songs, including some from KJ's recent album "Agriculture Is A Big Word." The Arts & Music Series will also be setting up tables with children's activities to teach them (and perhaps a few grown-ups) about their food and where it comes from. For more information about our musical guests, please visit their websites at http://www.kjsmile.com/ and http://kimbostudio.com/.

Regardless of this Friday's weather, there will certainly be plenty of good food available at the SVGM. Keep an eye out for some wonderful, seasonal treats; spring is the best, and sometimes only, time for things like asparagus, radishes, morel mushrooms, and rhubarb. If you've never had the pleasure of morels over fresh egg pasta, or of a homemade rhubarb cobbler fresh from the oven, there's no better time to get acquainted.

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, May 16th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Farm-fresh eggs
  • Spring onions and leeks
  • Tender spring lettuces and greens
  • Asparagus
  • Hothouse tomatoes
  • Rhubarb
  • Morel mushrooms
  • Pasture-raised poultry: Cornish hens and ducks, most likely; anyone looking for whole chickens should contact Bill Callahan of Cow-A-Hen Farm at (570) 966-2678 to reserve one
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised pork
  • Salsas, hot sauces, and flavored salts
  • Barbecue sauces for that Memorial Day cookout
  • Freshly cut flowers
  • Fresh herbs, both potted plants and freshly cut
  • Handmade soaps
  • Raw milk cheeses
  • Shiitake mushrooms
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Rhubarb Compote


Rhubarb, also sometimes called "pie plant," makes excellent pies and tarts, but there are times when even a homemade cobbler feels like too much effort. If that's the case - or if you find yourself with a little rhubarb, but not enough for a pie - it's quick and easy to make a compote like the one below. Treat it like jam, and spread a little on toast, or use it to top a bowl of yogurt for breakfast. And, should you regret not making that cobbler, serve it with a batch of homemade biscuits.

Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. rhubarb
  • 1/3 cup sugar, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • Zest of an orange (optional)
Directions:
  1. Cut the rhubarb into ½-inch pieces, cutting any especially thick stalks - those over 1-½ inches wide - in half along their length. Place all of the ingredients in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the rhubarb is tender but still able to hold its shape. Note: if you smell the sugar beginning to caramelize before the rhubarb has begun to give up its juices, add a splash more water to the pan.

  2. You can serve the compote immediately, while still hot, or refrigerate it for later. It may seem runny when it finishes cooking, but it will thicken as it cools.
* * * * *

On The Website
We often think of rhubarb as a special treat in pies - especially when its season overlaps with ripe, local strawberries - but it has been so much more than just "pie plant" for cultures around the world for thousands of years. Native to Asia, particularly Mongolia, Siberia and the Himalayas, rhubarb has been known in parts China for more than four thousand years, but recipes for sweet rhubarb pies only date back as far as the early 19th century. To learn a little more about the history of rhubarb - including a recipe for Khoresht-e Reevaas (Persian Rhubarb Stew) - stop by our website.

Check it out at: http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

Bonus Recipe, May 23rd: Khoresht-e Reevaas (Persian Rhubarb Stew)

Rhubarb, Rheum rhabarbarum, makes its appearance at farmers’ markets early in the spring season, and has been renowned for its culinary and medicinal uses for centuries. Native to Asia, particularly Mongolia, Siberia and the Himalayas, rhubarb has been known in parts of China for more than four thousand years, and the imported, dried roots were used as a medicine in places as far away as ancient Greece and Rome. By the 16th century, according to Alan Davidson’s The Oxford Companion to Food, rhubarb plants had become established in England, but it was not until the mid-18th century that the first references to eating it started to appear. Then, as sugar became widely available, recipes for sweet rhubarb tarts and pies cropped up in cookbooks throughout the 1800s.

Most of us think of rhubarb as a spring fruit – one common name is “pie plant” – and in fact, in 1947, the U.S. Customs Court in Buffalo, New York, ruled that rhubarb is a fruit. Despite that, it has been used in a wide variety of different culinary contexts throughout history. Northern Europeans use rhubarb to create savory, sour sauces for rich meats and fish, such as goose and mackerel; the food writer Elisabeth Luard notes that Scandinavians have traditionally made it into wine. In what is now Iran and Afghanistan, where rhubarb has grown for many centuries, the stalks have been a classic ingredient in khoresht stews and are often added to spinach dishes. In parts of Poland, it has been used to enliven potato dishes.

Along the Mediterranean, however, rhubarb never really caught on. Italians use it to make an aperitif, rabarbaro, and consider it essentially a health drink, which is not far removed from the old Roman take on it. In France, it is so little known that 1938 edition of the classic cooking reference Larousse Gastronomique advised cooking the leaves of rhubarb as if they were spinach!

All rhubarb lovers, however, know that the stalks are the only edible part of the plant; those trying rhubarb for the first time should be aware that the leaves are toxic. Their high content of oxalic acid and other compounds makes them potentially poisonous. Incidentally, the ancient, medicinal uses of rhubarb made use of the roots only; the chemicals found there do not appear in either the stems or leaves. The stems, however, are a special treat, and not one to be missed.

Seasonal Recipe
Khoresht-e Reevaas (Persian Rhubarb Stew)

Serves 4 to 6
Adapted from the Iran Chamber Society (www.iranchamber.com)

A khoresht is a highly adaptable, seasonal dish often served over rice. It often, but not always, includes meat, usually beef or lamb. The flavor, like many Persian and Iranian dishes, mixes sweet and sour flavors. The ingredients will change depending on the season and what's available in the marketplace; in spring, when rhubarb is plentiful, it adds both sweet and sour notes to this dish.

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs. rhubarb
  • 1 lb. beef (See note)
  • 2 lbs. spring onions (or 2 large bunches)
  • ½ cup finely chopped herbs, or to taste; mint and parsley are traditional
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup water, plus more as needed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Slice the white portions of the spring onions into thin rounds. Reserve some of the greens for garnish, if desired. Cut the beef into ¾-inch cubes. In a large pan with a lid, heat the olive oil over medium heat. When it is ready, add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until they are translucent and starting to brown at the edges. Add the beef and cook, stirring. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

  2. When the meat begins to color, add the water to the pan. Increase the heat to bring it to a boil, then cover the pan and reduce the heat to keep it at a simmer. Cook for about 45 minutes, or until the beef is tender. Stir occasionally and add more water as needed.

  3. Meanwhile, slice the rhubarb into ½-inch pieces, cutting any especially thick stalks - those over 1-½ inches wide - in half along their length. When the beef is ready, uncover the pan and raise the heat to medium. Add the rhubarb, herbs, and sugar, and cook for 5 to 10 minutes longer, or until the rhubarb is tender but not mushy. Taste and season as necessary, and serve immediately.
Note: When selecting a cut of meat for this recipe, choose a tougher cut that will benefit from long, slow, moist cooking. Chuck, for example, has a fair amount of connective tissue that slowly breaks down during braising to produce a meltingly tender texture.

Thursday, May 15, 2008

News from the SVGM - May 16th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
May 16th, 2008

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Products This Week
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
It's a new season for the Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market, back for our fourth year! That's right - it's a new season for fresh, local food and handmade goods starting on May 16th. Every Friday through October, look for good things in Hufnagle Park in downtown Lewisburg; the market hours run from 12 noon until 5pm.

This year, expect to find lots of great things, from seasonal vegetables and fruits to sustainably raised meats to prepared foods, as well as cut flowers, handmade soaps, and lots more! As always, what you find at the growers' market has been grown, raised, or made by the vendors, so it's one of the best opportunities to connect with producers and learn more about what you're eating and where it's coming from.

We'll also have music and activities this week, so bring your kids and your friends! It's all part of the 2008 Community Arts & Music Series in Lewisburg, and it's free and open to everyone. KJ Wagner will be performing a variety of songs from her latest album, "Agriculture Is A Big Word;" you can learn more about her and her music at her website, http://www.kjsmile.com/. There will also be a table with childrens' activities to teach them about their food and where it comes from.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
Friday, May 16th, 2008
12pm - 5pm
Hufnagle Park, Lewisburg
(between 5th and 6th Streets, just off of Market Street)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/

* * * * *

Products This Week
Following is just a partial list of what you can expect to find at the market this week:
  • Fresh, seasonal vegetables
  • Pasture-raised poultry
  • Grass-fed beef
  • Pasture-raised pork
  • Breads and other baked goods
  • Homemade chicken and vegetable pies; quiches; potato-cheese and salmon pierogies; chicken stock; liver pate and more
  • Salsas and hot sauces, from sweet to spicy
  • Freshly cut flowers and herbs
  • Handmade soaps
  • Raw milk cheeses
* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Pork Chops with Arugula Pesto

Serves 4
Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997) and How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)

It's grilling season again, with long, sunny days making for pleasant evenings tending a charcoal fire. Try this version for adding a little zip to the usual grilled pork chops. Or, for a vegetarian alternative, try the arugula pesto with some grilled vegetables, or even as a delicious sandwich spread.

Ingredients:
Grilled pork chops:
  • 4 center-cut pork chops, bone-in or boneless
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive or other vegetable oil
Arugula pesto:
  • 2 cups loosely packed arugula leaves, tough stems removed
  • 2 tablespoons walnuts or pine nuts
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ clove garlic
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Sprinkle the pork chops evenly with the salt, coriander and pepper. Allow to rest for at least half an hour, or even overnight in the refrigerator if possible, to allow the seasoning to penetrate.

  2. Light the grill. While the grill is heating, prepare the arugula pesto. In a food processor, combine the arugula, nuts, garlic, a pinch of salt and about half of the oil. Process, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed. Add the rest of the oil gradually, working the mixture until it is as smooth as you like. Season with extra salt if necessary, and add extra olive oil to thin the pesto, if desired.

  3. Rub the pork chops with oil before placing them on the grill. Cook for approximately 5 to 8 minutes per side for bone-in chops, 4 to 6 minutes per side for boneless; how long will depend on the heat of your grill and your personal preference for doneness. Allow the chops to rest for a minute before serving, and top each with a spoonful of the arugula pesto.
* * * * *

On The Website
Check out our new website! http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/ Throughout the market season, you can stop there for a variety of interesting information about the market and our vendors, pictures, more recipes, and an index of past newsletters. This week, stop by for a recipe for Butter-Braised Radishes!

Bonus Recipe, May 16th: Butter-Braised Radishes

Seasonal Recipe
Butter-Braised Radishes

Serves 4
Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1998)

Spring is the time for radishes. They're delicious on their own, of course, just trimmed or sliced into a salad, but they take well to careful cooking, too. This recipe is a simple and tasty way to use those market radishes when they're so abundant.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. radishes, trimmed of greens and tails
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon neutral-flavored oil (such as canola)
  • ¼ cup chicken stock, white wine, or water
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large skillet, heat the butter and oil over medium heat. Once the butter has melted, add in the radishes and stir until they are evenly coated. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

  2. Add the chicken stock or white wine, the vinegar, and the sugar, and stir to combine. Cover the skillet and reduce the heat. Cook until the radishes are just tender when pierced with a knife; start checking after about 5 minutes.

  3. When the radishes are tender, remove the lid and raise the heat to medium-high. Stirring constantly, cook for a few minutes until the liquid has reduced to a syrupy glaze. Serve immediately.