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Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

News from the SVGM

It’s been a day of beautiful rain showers where I live~~~much-needed rain that I sincerely hope has reached everyone in our valley who has needed it so much. Rain has been scarce throughout our valley’s area these past couple of months; some have received just enough, others further south have experienced close to a month and a half of severely dry weather. Let’s hope this weekend’s forecast brings everyone relief~~~
Yes, it looks like rain for tomorrow’s market, but rain doesn’t stop us from coming out: we’ll keep out the chill with extra gear, keep dry under our canopies, and maybe grab a hot cup of coffee from Buzzsaw. Woody Wolfe will be with us sharing his talents for plucking a guitar and rendering a song into its proper celebration, so we’ll have great background music, too. 
A reminder that Bill Callahan of Cow-a-Hen Farm is currently taking orders for Thanksgiving turkeys.
And as I mentioned last week, now is a great time to stock your freezer and pantry for the winter ahead. Check for bulk produce to can or freeze, and also meats and poultry and specialty cuts for freezing; meat and poultry, if tightly wrapped, will retain its quality for up to six months in the freezer. Stock up with fresh local foods now, so you’re not stuck running to the grocers’ aisles for lesser-quality ingredients.
So get your rain gear out for the market tomorrow, bring lots of shopping bags for our late-September abundance, and help us celebrate the harvest of autumn!  See you then~~~
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Specialty hot peppers, heirloom potatoes, eggs, tomatillos, heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, cabbage, garlic, cucumbers, specialty iced teas and lemonades
Quaff Meadows
Head lettuce, sweet peppers, okra, pie pumpkins, butternut squash, turnips, kale, beets, cabbage, eggplant, string beans, zucchini, sweet onions, carrots, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, watermelons, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground, cubes, steaks, racks 
Garden Secrets:  Now PA Preferred!
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto, Sweet Pepper Relish, Cherokee Port gourmet ketchup
The Farm in Milton: 
Kale, chard, yellow squash, heirloom tomatoes, acorn squash, scalllions, beets, bok choy, cabbage, purple tomatillos
Wild for Salmon: Back October 7!
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, eggs, zucchini, yellow squash, potatoes, banana peppers, string beans, cabbage, broccoli 
Beiler's Farm:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads; apples, pears, grapes, melons; handmade canned goods, mums
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, sunflower shoots, bean sprouts, microgreens; dried beans, eggs, potatoes, garlic

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Sweet Potato, Quinoa, Spinach and Red Lentil Burger
Adapted from www.cooking.nytimes.com, recipe by Martha Rose Schulman Makes 10 patties 
      A fall-inspired veggie burger with a really fresh balance of delicious flavors, and quinoa and red lentils for texture. Serve them with raita and chutney, or a garlic-flavored yogurt sauce, and naan or pita to carry through the Mediterranean feel.  Freeze any extra for an easy reheat meal~~~
Ingredients:

cup quinoa (blond or black), rinsed
cup red lentils, rinsed
1 ⅔ cups water
Salt to taste
1 ½ pounds sweet potatoes, baked
3 cups, tightly packed, chopped fresh spinach
3 ounces feta, crumbled (about 3/4 cup)
3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
¼ cup minced chives
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Freshly ground pepper to taste
1 cup panko or chickpea flour (you will not use all of it)
¼ cup grape seed oil

Directions:
Combine quinoa, red lentils, water and salt to taste (I used a rounded 1/2 teaspoon) in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes, until quinoa is tender and blond quinoa displays a thread, and lentils are just tender. Drain off any water remaining in the pot through a strainer, tapping strainer against the sink to remove excess water, then return quinoa and lentils to the pot. Cover pot with a towel, then return the lid and let sit undisturbed for 15 minutes.

Skin sweet potatoes and place in a large bowl. Mash with a fork. Add spinach and mash together (I use my hands for this). Add quinoa and lentils, feta, mint, chives, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix together well. Mixture will be moist.

Take up about 1/3 cup of the mixture and form into a ball (you can wet your
hands to reduce sticking). Roll the ball in the panko or chickpea flour, then gently
flatten into a patty. Set on a plate and continue with the rest of the mixture.
Refrigerate uncovered for 1 hour or longer (the longer the better).

When you’re ready to cook, place a rack over a sheet pan. Heat 2 tablespoons
oil in a 12-inch, heavy nonstick frying pan over high heat. Swirl the pan to coat
with the hot oil. Lower heat to medium. Place 4 to 5 patties in the pan (do not
crowd), and cook until well browned on one side, about 4 minutes. Turn and
brown for about 4 more minutes. Remove to rack. Heat remaining oil in the pan
and cook remaining patties. Keep patties warm in a low oven until ready to serve.
Serve with a salad and your choice of toppings, such as the usual (ketchup,
mustard, relish), or yogurt raita, garlic yogurt, or chutney.

Advance preparation: You can form the patties and keep them refrigerated for up to 2 days, or cook them all the way through and keep them refrigerated for 2 or 3 days. Reheat on a baking sheet in a low oven for 10 to 15 minutes. The patties freeze well. Thaw completely before reheating.




Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com









Thursday, September 22, 2016

News from the SVGM

     This morning around 7:20am, the summer season gracefully moved through the Autumn Equinox to usher in the fall. And with this passage, it looks like we’re finally getting some lasting honest-to-goodness fall weather: after tomorrow’s high 80’s, those glorious low to mid 70’s appear in the longer term forecast. But the most blissful part of the change? The near-perfect sleeping the accompanying cool nights induce, especially with an open window to let the crispy fresh air waft over you while you snooze. Early fall brings a refreshing clarity to the outdoors, and last weekend’s crazy storms rehydrated the thirsty landscape and farm fields. I hope, though, that no one suffered too much damage from fallen branches and trees; I know there were some power outages. We’re still cleaning up our black walnut branch fallout (not to mention those walnuts…….)~~~
     Once we get through these couple of warm days, the continuing shorter days and quickly cooling evenings start to have an effect on one’s appetites. The grills will still be firing, but soups and chilis and heartier roasts and pastas will soon sound immensely appetizing! The market stands are at perfect equilibrium right now with late summer and early autumn produce, from tomatoes and zucchinis, to broccoli and sweet peppers, to butternut squashes and cabbages. It’s truly a great time to make a fresh vegetable soup or curry, flavored with a meat bone or not. And winter squashes and potatoes, and even quarters of cabbage, are all made more sweetly delicious if thrown on the grill. 
     Bill Callahan of Cow-a-Hen Farm is currently taking orders for Thanksgiving turkeys. Goose Day is also next Thursday, September 29; check with him on availability tomorrow if you’re interested in celebrating this quintessential Central Pennsylvania holiday~~ it’s derived from the English St. Michaelmas Day, and eating goose on the 29th could very well bring you the good luck that you’re looking for!
     You will also see signs on some of our vendor tables reminding you that now is a great time to stock your freezer and pantry for the winter ahead. Check for bulk produce to can or freeze, and also meats and poultry and specialty cuts for freezing; meat and poultry, if tightly wrapped, will retain its quality for up to six months in the freezer. Stock up with fresh local foods now, so you’re not stuck running to the grocers’ aisles for lesser-quality ingredients.
     It’s going to be another beautiful day at the market tomorrow; come celebrate the harvest of autumn!  See you then~~~
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, tomatillos, heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, cabbage, garlic, cucumbers, specialty iced teas and lemonades
Quaff Meadows
Head lettuce, sweet peppers, corn, pie pumpkins, butternut squash, turnips, kale, beets, cabbage, eggplant, string beans, zucchini, sweet onions, carrots, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, watermelons, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground, cubes, steaks, racks 
Garden Secrets:  Now PA Preferred!
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto, Sweet Pepper Relish, Cherokee Port gourmet ketchup
The Farm in Milton: 
Kale, chard, yellow squash, heirloom tomatoes, lemon cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, acorn squash, beets, bok choy, cabbage, purple tomatillos
Wild for Salmon: Back October 7!
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, eggs, zucchini, yellow squash, potatoes, banana peppers, string beans, cabbage, corn, broccoli 
Beiler's Farm:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads; apples, pears, grapes, melons; handmade canned goods, mums
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, sunflower shoots, bean sprouts, microgreens; dried beans, eggs, potatoes, garlic

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Curried Lamb Potpie
Adapted from www.foodandwine.com, recipe by Matthew Accarrino (Food and Wine, October 2012)
Serves 6 
Ingredients:
PASTRY
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 stick cold unsalted butter, diced
1/4 cup ice water
CURRY
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 pounds trimmed boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 3/4-inch cubes
Salt & freshly ground pepper
1 medium onion, chopped
2 teaspoons curry powder
2 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/3 cup dry white wine
2 cups chicken stock
2 cups peeled butternut squash, cut into 1-inch dice (10 ounces)
2 cups chopped Tuscan kale
1 medium carrot, chopped
1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
1 large egg lightly beaten with 1 teaspoon of water
Directions:
MAKE THE PASTRY In a food processor, pulse the flour and salt. Add the butter; pulse to the size of peas. Sprinkle the ice water over and pulse until the pastry starts to come together. On a work surface, gently knead the pastry a few times. Shape into a disk, wrap in plastic and refrigerate until firm, 1 1/2 hours.
MAKE THE CURRY In a Dutch oven, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Season the lamb with salt and pepper and add half to the casserole. Cook over high heat until browned on 2 sides, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the lamb to a bowl; repeat with 1 more tablespoon of oil and the remaining lamb. Pour off the oil in the casserole.
Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil and the lamb to the casserole. Add the onion and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened. Add the curry powder and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the flour, then slowly stir in the wine until smooth. Add the stock and bring to a boil, stirring, until thickened, 1 minute. Cover and simmer over low heat until the lamb is very tender, 1 hour.
Add the squash, kale, carrot and coconut milk to the casserole and simmer over moderately low heat until the vegetables are tender, 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Stir in the parsley and let cool.
ASSEMBLE THE POTPIE Preheat the oven to 375°. Spoon the curry into a buttered 8 by-11-inch baking dish. Brush the dish rim with beaten egg. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pastry to a 14-by-12-inch rectangle. Fold the pastry in half, unfold it over the curry, and gently press onto the edge of the dish. Brush with beaten egg; cut 4 small steam vents in the top. 
BAKE THE POTPIE Bake the potpie for 40 minutes. Raise the heat to 450°; bake for 20 minutes longer, until the
pastry is browned and cooked through. Let rest for 20 minutes, then serve.

 * * * * *

Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com








Thursday, September 15, 2016

News from the SVGM

     As I write this today, it’s a little bit later than usual in the afternoon; I not only hear the elated laughter of the local kids getting off of the school bus, but I also hear the surround-sound of flocks of starlings that are having an intensely active day in our trees and fields. It is a beautiful, though exceedingly dry, day~~ full of a blue sky and brilliant sunshine, and the late-afternoon warmth has finally heated up the interior of my house from the chill of last night’s open windows. Welcome to the approaching days of autumn! 
     At market these next few weeks you’ll continue to find the last of summer’s hot-weather vegetables, but you’ll also see an upswing in the cooler temperature loving crops such as acorn and butternut squashes, lettuces and cut greens, kale, chard, cabbage, and potatoes, and pumpkins and apples. It’s not been an easy growing season this year for our rock star farmers; they’ve battled everything from a killing late-spring freeze that set the season back weeks, to lack of sufficient rains in many of our growing areas, to 90-plus temperatures throughout July and August. And now, beautiful sunshine, but again, precious few raindrops… 
     And yet, the abundance at the Growers’ Market is still a sight to behold these days~~~our farmers once again have worked with Nature’s capriciousness to bring you the best local foods for your table: when you shop at the SVGM, you can be assured of quality, a high nutritional value, and a fresh delicious flavor that you simply can’t find at the supermarket. Not to mention the respectful and sustainable way these growers approach this fine art of cultivating and raising and producing the artisan foods we call “local.”
     So don those hats and sunglasses when you come to shop with us tomorrow~~ for it’s going to be another sunny day at the market! See you then~~~
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry: freshly cut pork
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, tomatillos, heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, cabbage, garlic, cucumbers, specialty iced teas and lemonades
Quaff Meadows
Head lettuce, sweet peppers, corn, pie pumpkins, edamame, kale, beets, cabbage, eggplant, string beans, zucchini, sweet onions, carrots, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground, cubes, steaks, racks 
Garden Secrets:  Now PA Preferred!
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto, Sweet Pepper Relish, Cherokee Port gourmet ketchup
The Farm in Milton: 
Kale, chard, yellow squash, heirloom tomatoes, lemon cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, acorn squash, beets; bok choy, dwarf blue kale, cabbage, purple tomatillos
Wild for Salmon: Back October 7!
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Peaches, apples, sweet corn, watermelon
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, eggs, zucchini, yellow squash, potatoes, banana peppers, string beans, cabbage, corn, broccoli 
Beiler's Bakery:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads, apples
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, sunflower shoots, bean sprouts, microgreens

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Pasta with Kale Pesto and Butternut Squash
Adapted from cooking.nytimes.com, Melissa Clark
Serves 4 
     This is a great nourishing dinner that is also a terrific combination of flavors; whip it up after a weekend hike or bike ride, or during the week to fuel your souls for school and work and the busyness that autumn ushers in. The sturdy kale adds a heartiness to the traditional pesto that basil simply doesn’t, and the combination of kale and butternut, acorn, or any sweet squash is always a good one. You can optionally use the walnuts whole or coarsely broken, instead of pureeing them in the pesto, for additional textural crunch~~~
Ingredients:
1-1/2 pounds butternut squash
1/4 to 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil for pesto, more for drizzling over squash
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, more for squash
Freshly ground black pepper
1 small bunch (about 1/2 pound) lacinato kale, center ribs removed
8 ounces pasta (penne rigate works well)
1/3 cup toasted walnuts
2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped
Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
Freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste
Grated Parmesan cheese, for serving
Directions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Use a vegetable peeler to peel squash, then halve it lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Dice squash flesh into 1-inch pieces, place on a baking sheet, and toss with olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread pieces into an even layer, making sure there is space between them. Roast, stirring squash pieces once or twice, until golden brown and tender, about 30-40 minutes.
Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; have ready a bowl of ice water. Drop kale into boiling water and cook for 45 seconds. Use tongs or slotted spoon to transfer kale to ice water. Bring water in pot back to a boil, adding more if necessary so there is enough to cook pasta.
Drain kale well, then wrap tightly in a dry kitchen towel and squeeze thoroughly to remove any excess moisture. Roughly chop leaves. When water in pot comes back to a boil, cook pasta according to package directions.
In a food processor, pulse together kale, nuts, garlic, salt and lemon zest until mixture is smooth and salt has dissolved. With motor running, slowly drizzle in the oil until fully incorporated. Taste and add more salt dissolved in a little lemon juice, if necessary.
Drain pasta, reserving a little cooking water. Toss pasta with kale pesto and some pasta cooking water if necessary to help it coat pasta. Add cheese, lemon juice and salt to taste. Serve topped with squash and more cheese.


Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com. 









Thursday, September 8, 2016

News from the SVGM

        I hope that most of you received a bit of the rain last night from the minor swaths of storms that moved through the area~~~though it upped the humidity ante, it was awfully nice to awaken to a still-wet, ever-so-slightly refreshed landscape after the dry weeks we’ve experienced during this late-summer time. 
I turned to my copy of Mario Batali’s 2014 America—Farm to Table cookbook for this week’s seasonal recipe, and reread his introduction to a cookbook that highlights small farms across the US. I was struck by his observation of something I’ve come to believe in fervently: that “the single most important trick to elevating the home cook’s potential… is much simpler: It is the sourcing of quality ingredients…The real story here is that the farmers…are capable of changing the food you eat at home much more significantly than equipment or cookbooks or tips or TV shows you watch.” We live in a world of crazily trendy food things, whether reality TV competitions, unnecessary gadgetry and restaurant-grade equipment envy, and exotic foodstuffs and techniques that were previously unheard of. But the fact of the matter is, if you don’t start with the freshest quality ingredients you can lay your hands on, that perfect dish will fall short no matter how sophisticated your cooking tools may be. As someone who cooked professionally for many years, I realized a number of years ago that all I really want now is an incredibly fresh chicken to roast, or a perfect fresh-picked head of Romaine to toss simply for a salad. A handful of carefully raised potatoes to roast with olive oil; an exquisite artisan raw-milk cheese to melt on a fragrant piece of just-baked bread.  This is the very basic and necessary quality that locally produced ingredients can bring to your cooking and your table. 
     And then there is this~~~which I love!~~~(thank you, Mario):
                  ”…local small farmers are the new rock stars.”
Yes! Why would you begin your food shopping anywhere else but at the SVGM tomorrow? Come visit your local rock stars~~~it’s their high season; let it be yours, too!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, tomatillos, heirloom tomatoes, eggplant, cabbage, garlic, cucumbers, specialty iced teas and lemonades
Quaff Meadows
Head lettuce, sweet peppers, corn, pie pumpkins, edamame, kale, beets, cabbage, eggplant, string beans, zucchini, sweet onions, carrots, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground, cubes, steaks, racks 
Garden Secrets:  Now PA Preferred!
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto, Sweet Pepper Relish, Cherokee Port gourmet ketchup
The Farm in Milton: 
Kale, chard, yellow squash, heirloom tomatoes, lemon cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, acorn squash, beets; bok choy, dwarf blue kale, cabbage, purple tomatillos
Wild for Salmon: Back October 7!
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Peaches, apples, sweet corn, watermelon
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, eggs, zucchini, yellow squash, potatoes, banana peppers, string beans, cabbage, corn, broccoli 
Beiler's Bakery:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads, apples
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola
Little Red Hen Farm:
Pea shoots, sunflower shoots, bean sprouts, microgreens

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Gazpacho
Adapted from America—Farm to Table, Mario Batali & Jim Webster (Grand Central Publishing, 2014)
Serves 4 
     With this September blast of heat and the abundance of gorgeous tomatoes out there, a recipe for Gazpacho seems so very appropriate! This is always a refreshing and quickly simple cold soup to prepare, and is healthy, vegan, and can be made ahead, as it stores well in the fridge for a few days. Serve it as an appetizer or a main course for lunch, and feel the healthy coolness~~~~

Ingredients:
2 large cucumbers
2 bell peppers, preferably red or yellow, seeded and roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 large, very ripe heirloom tomatoes, quartered
1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
1 cup ice cubes
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
1/2 cup water
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more as needed
Freshly ground black pepper
3 slices bread, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 pint mixed cherry tomatoes, halved
1 small bunch chives, cut into 1-inch batons (optional)
Pinch of red pepper flakes (optional)

Directions
     Cut an unpeeled 3-inch section of cucumber into 1/4-inch dice and set aside in a small bowl. Peel and seed the remaining cucumbers, cut into chunks, and place in a big bowl along with the bell peppers, garlic and heirloom tomato quarters. Working in batches if necessary, place the vegetables in a food processor along with the salt, ice, vinegar, and water and pulse until liquefied and smooth. When all the vegetables have been pureed, whisk in 1/2 cutoff the olive oil until shiny , smooth and glossy. Pour into a large bowl, cover, and refrigerate until very cold. Check seasoning and add fresh pepper to taste. 
     In a nonstick 12-inch saute pan, heat the remaining 1/4 cup olive oil over medium heat. Add the bread cubes and cook until uniformly golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and keep in a warm place. Place the cherry tomatoes in a bowl and set aside.
     Divide the gazpacho evenly among four bowls. Drizzle with a bit of olive oil and sprinkle with chives and red pepper flakes, if desired. Serve the croutons, cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes on the side for each guest to garnish the gazpacho as desired.

Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com.