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Thursday, July 28, 2016

News from the SVGM

     And here we are, at the end of July—already! Vacations are in full swing, kids’ camps are in full swing, and the dog days of summer have been their “doggiest” this year. The fields are high with corn, and lush with soybeans (and dotted with foraging deer in the evenings), but increasingly, as I drive through this area’s countryside, the large acreages of feed corn and soy are interspersed with the smaller-scale fields of the local food producing farms. These fields are beautifully and neatly divided into their crops: corn, beans, squash, cut flowers, melons, and rows of tomatoes under cover in their rolled-side hoop houses. It’s encouraging to see these small producers continue to spring up all around us; “buy fresh, buy local” is here to stay, and we’re blessed to be in this rolling-acreage part of Pennsylvania where we can experience it so viscerally on a daily basis. 
    The SVGM is proud to have been one of the area’s original “growers’ only” markets in this groundswell local foods movement. For the past eleven years—-yes, this is our twelfth season!—we have stayed true to our own roots: we continue to bring you local foods and products that are grown and produced by the vendors who sell them, and done so in the most sustainable, ecologically conscientious way possible. This market is a true community of like-minded people, and their tenacity in withstanding the ups and downs of each market season is simply an outgrowth of the passion they show in their work as farmers and small-business food producers. Theirs’ is a vision and a belief in the betterment of our food supplies that begins in their own fields, barns and kitchens. It’s important to remember that the support you have shown them over all these years has been crucial to their continued involvement in this oh-so-important movement. We are always grateful to you, our customers~~~thank you.
    This week, Linn Auman’s Garden Secrets will not be at market, but he’ll be back next week with freshly made Sweet and Hot Pepper relishes!
     So keep celebrating summer’s best with us: don those sunglasses and hats and bring your water bottles and shopping bags~~~ we’ll see you tomorrow!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, beets, chard, parsley, and lots of of garlic, plants, squash and cucumbers, specialty iced teas and lemonades
Quaff Meadows
Leaf lettuce, head lettuce, kale, beets, turnips, zucchini, carrots, mint, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground. 
Garden Secrets: Off this week— see you next week!  
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto
The Farm in Milton: 
Seasonal produce: including greens, summer squash, tomatoes
Wild for Salmon: Fishing in Alaska!— Back later this season
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Seasonal fruits: Peaches, Lodi Apples
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, eggs, greens 
Beiler's Bakery:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Bone-in Rib Eye Steaks with Grilled Onion Jam
Adapted from foodandwine.com; recipe by Dan Kluger (Food & Wine: August 2016)
4 Servings
     “The combination of tangy-sweet jam and garlicky, buttery meat is irresistible. New York City chef Dan Kluger says the trick to grilling perfect steak is starting the meat at room temperature and turning it often so it cooks evenly.”
     Pair these steaks with a fresh tomato salad and a fresh loaf of artisan bread to sop up the flavorful juices~~~~ I think this recipe would work well with pork tenderloin or chops, too!

Ingredients:
Onion Jam
3 red or local sweet, slicing onions, sliced
Extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing
Kosher salt and pepper
1 cup apple cider
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1-4 tsp. finely chopped thyme

Steaks
Two 1 1/2-lb. bone-in rib eye steaks, at room temperature
Extra-virgin olive oil for brushing
Kosher salt an pepper
2 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
2 tsp. minced rosemary
2 tsp. minced thyme
2 garlic cloves, grated

Directions
Make the onion jam: Light a grill or preheat a grill pan. Brush the onions with
the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill over moderate heat, turning
once, until lightly charred and tender, about 7 minutes.

In a saucepan, bring the vinegar and maple syrup to a boil. Add the onions and simmer over moderately low heat until tender, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; let cool. Stir in the thyme. Season with salt and pepper.

Make the steaks: Light a grill or preheat a grill pan. Brush the steaks with oil and season with salt and pepper. Stand the steaks on their fatty edges (bone side up) and cook over moderate heat until the fat has started to render and is light charred, about 5 minutes. Lay the steaks flat. Grill, turning often, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 120 degrees, 12-15 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board; let rest for 10 minutes. Leave the grill on.

In a bowl, blend the butter, rosemary, thyme, and garlic. Brush the herb mixture on the steaks and grill over high heat, turning once, until sizzling, 1 minute per side. Transfer to a carving board. Slice the steaks and serve with the onion jam.

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Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com








Thursday, July 21, 2016

News from the SVGM

After the sporadic but heavy thunderstorms of Monday, a less humid clarity settled into the atmosphere for the gorgeous rise of Tuesday’s full moon, traditionally known as the Buck or Thunder or Hay Moon. The clear, brightly lit evenings brought on a coolness which in turn brought on utterly refreshing mornings, and it genuinely felt like a “break” from the intense heat of the past few weeks: it felt as though we only had to endure the mid-day temperature spike, the evenings cooled down so quickly.
And though we’re headed into a scorcher weekend, Bill Callahan last week reminded me of another of the hot, dry summer days’ advantages: the tomatoes and peaches are particularly lush this year in both juiciness and flavor, and both are deliciously sweet. So are the zucchini and cucumbers I’ve had for that matter, and I bet the corn will be outstanding this season if the pattern continues. 
Fresh, light-tasting and light-feeling meals continue to be what we crave after a hot day, and the SVGM is the best place to get the best flavored foods to prepare simply and quickly. 
So keep celebrating summer with us: don those sunglasses and hats and bring your water bottles and shopping bags~~~and we’ll see you tomorrow!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry: Freshly cut pork 
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, beets, chard, parsley, and lots of of garlic, plants, squash and cucumbers, meadow tea and black raspberry lemonade
Quaff Meadows
Leaf lettuce, head lettuce, kale, beets, turnips, zucchini, carrots, mint, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground. 
Garden Secrets:  
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, Basil/Roasted Sunflower Seed Pesto
The Farm in Milton: 
Seasonal produce: including greens, summer squash, tomatoes
Wild for Salmon: Fishing in Alaska! Back later this season
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Seasonal fruits: Peaches, Lodi Apples
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, black raspberries, eggs, greens 
Beiler's Bakery:
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads
Luke Weaver Greenhouses:
Hothouse tomatoes, raspberries 
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Summer Pasta with Zucchini, Ricotta, and Basil
Adapted from NYT Cooking; recipe by David Tanis 
4-6 Servings
     And who can’t use another recipe for zucchini? This is a fresh and easy pasta that highlights some of the best of the season: zucchini, basil, garlic, and fresh onion.  If you can find an artisanal-quality ricotta instead of the generic brands we’re used to, it will definitely elevate this recipe’s flavor; I also think a soft goat cheese would work beautifully in this dish. 
     You could use a mix of summer squashes and zucchini, too. And lastly, step 2 is basically a pesto technique without the nuts~~~ another variation would be to substitute a fresh, pre-made pesto like Garden Secrets’  Basil/Roasted Sunflower Pesto. Enjoy the possibilities!
(Make your own ricotta!

Ingredients:
Extra-virgin olive oil
1 small onion, finely diced
2 pounds zucchini, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick pieces (for larger zucchini, cut in half lengthwise before slicing)
Salt and pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced, or 2 tablespoons chopped green garlic
1 ounce basil, about 2 cups loose leaves
1 pound ziti or other dry pasta
8 ounces ricotta, about 1 cup 
Pinch of crushed red pepper
Zest of 1 lemon
2 ounces grated Parmesan, pecorino or a mixture, about 1 cup, plus more for serving

Directions:
1. Put a pot of water on to boil. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook the onions in 3 tablespoons olive oil until softened, 5 to 8 minutes. Reduce heat as necessary to keep onions from browning. Add zucchini, season generously with salt and pepper, and continue cooking, stirring occasionally until rather soft, about 10 minutes. Turn off heat.
2. Meanwhile, use a mortar and pestle to pound garlic, basil, and a little salt into a rough paste (or use a mini food processor). Stir in 3 tablespoons olive oil.
3. Salt the pasta water well and put in the pasta, stirring. Boil per package instructions but make sure to keep pasta quite al dente. Drain pasta, reserving 1 cup of coking water.
4. Add cooked pasta to zucchini in skillet and turn heat to medium-high. Add 1/2 cup cooking water, then the ricotta, crushed red pepper and lemon zest, stirring to distribute. Check seasoning and adjust. Cook for 1 minute more. Mixture should look creamy. Add a little more pasta water if necessary. Add the basil paste and half the grated cheese and quickly stir to incorporate. Spoon pasta into warm soup plates and sprinkle with additional cheese. Serve immediately.

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Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com. 









Thursday, July 14, 2016

News from the SVGM

Okay, it’s officially HOT~~~ it has been a while since we’ve had such a long stretch of predominantly 90 degree temps, and it doesn’t look like it’s going to let up anytime soon. Some of the positives? The fireflies are astounding this year; there’s a magic that happens right outside my door when the sun goes down, and my garden becomes a veritable fairyland! We’ve also had enough rain (so far) to keep things fairly green; areas under and around the trees feel refreshing and even cool; there’s nothing like the shade of a tree in summer~~~yet it’s dry and hot enough that the grass has slowed down for mowing. And, last but not least, the heat is absolute nirvana for tomatoes and basil and zucchinis and such… 
Indeed, the middle of summer requires a fresher, lighter kind of nourishment for your body and soul, and the Growers’ Market is just the spot to nurture that summer appetite. Everything tastes better on a grill if you need to cook, and summer’s produce allows you to toss together a cool salad of fresh vegetables and fruits, or just lightly steam or grill them instead. Cooking and eating in this kind of heat becomes a matter of simplicity, and the fresh locally produced foods we have to offer are so good on their own, that they require only the simplest of preparations for a delicious, quick, and nourishing meal.
We have a few vendor updates for you this week:
Linn Auman of Garden Secrets has his wonderful basil/roasted sunflower seed pesto this week, so be sure to stop by and pick up a jar: it’s not only awesome on pasta, but it’s a beautiful spread for fresh bread, and a great condiment for just about anything from burgers to veggies.
Beiler’s Bakery will be off this week, but they will be back to market next week.
And Wild for Salmon, well, they’ve gone fishing! The salmon fishing season has begun in Alaska, so we will let you know when they plan to resume their market schedule with their fresh catch; probably late August or early September.
Keep celebrating summer with us~~~ see you tomorrow!
This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, pork and poultry
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, shell peas, beets, chard, parsley, and lots of of garlic, plants, squash and cucumbers, meadow tea and flavored lemonade
Quaff Meadows
Leaf lettuce, head lettuce, kale, sugar snap peas, hull peas, beets, turnips, zucchini, carrots, mint, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground. 
Garden Secrets:  
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, basil/roasted sunflower seed pesto
The Farm in Milton: 
Seasonal produce: including greens, summer squash, tomatoes
Wild for Salmon: Fishing in Alaska! Back later this season
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Seasonal fruits
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, black raspberries, eggs 
Beiler's Bakery: off this week
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads
Luke Weaver Greenhouses:
Hothouse tomatoes, hothouse heirloom tomatoes, raspberries 
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola

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* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Grilled Pork and Peaches
Adapted from NYTimes.com; recipe by Sam Sifton 
4 Servings
Here is a dinner you could cook on a cast-iron skillet or a pancake griddle set on the grate above a fire pit if you’re camping, or on a grill in someone’s backyard, that produces a mouth-watering, yet essentially simple, main course. Sam Sifton of NYTimes.com talks about a searing and cooking technique he terms “the uncertain edge of burnt.” “It requires patience and keen observation,” he writes.  “What you are looking for on the edges of the meat and fruit is color: a deep, dark brown that is almost black — a black without bitter, a burn that is not burned.”  

Ingredients:
Boneless pork butt, approximately 2 pounds, butterflied and trimmed
8 to 10 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary needles
8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
6 fresh peaches, skin on, cut in half and pitted
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into dice

Directions:
1. Light a fire in a fire pit with a grill, or in a charcoal grill, or set a gas grill to high. If you have a very strong vent
in your kitchen, you may use your stove with a burner set to high. Place a large cast-iron pan or two-burner
griddle over the heat and allow it to get hot. At this point you can let the fire die slightly with no ill effect.
If using a gas grill or stove, turn heat to medium.

2. Meanwhile, put the pork on a work surface and, using a meat mallet, pound to an even thickness of
approximately 3/4 of an inch.

3. Combine the garlic, rosemary and 6 tablespoons olive oil in a small bowl, mixing to make a rough paste. Season the pork aggressively on both sides with salt and pepper, then spread half the garlic mixture over one side and half on the other side.

4. Brush the pan or griddle with the remaining olive oil, allow it to heat until it shimmers and is almost smoking, then place meat on the hot surface and cook, without touching, until it forms a good crust, approximately 10 minutes.

5. While the meat cooks, surround it with the peaches, cut side down, and dot the fruit with the butter. (If you’re using two cast-iron skillets, place the peaches in their own oiled pan.) Let them cook for approximately 5 minutes, or until they are soft and slightly charred. Transfer to a platter and tent with foil to keep warm.

6. When the meat is well browned on the first side, use tongs to turn it over, and cook in the remaining butter for another 5 to 7 minutes. Remove the meat to a carving board and allow it to rest below a tent of foil for approximately 5 minutes. Slice the meat and serve with the peaches.

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Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com







Thursday, July 7, 2016

News from the SVGM

I hope you all had a wonderful holiday this past week; the Fourth falling on a Monday gave everyone plenty of time to celebrate: I heard fireworks displays up and down the river from Friday through Monday!  And with that long weekend, it now truly feels like we’ve entered summer: the first of the zucchini and summer squash has already appeared at the market, and our farmers have perfected tomatoes in their greenhouses and under cold frames to give us a taste weeks before the “field-growns" are ready. Red and black raspberries have ripened, and the early summer garlic and fresh potatoes are being dug. We’ve had some rain, and now are headed into the true heat of summer, which those hot-loving vegetables thrive on. We’re on our way to our mid-summer stride at the SVGM!

I have a correction from last week’s email: Jesse & Hannah Darrow asked me to clarify that, yes, they are the owners of the Sawhorse Cafe in Williamsport, but their coffee company is called  “Buzzsaw Coffee”~~~ a perfect coffee name if I ever did hear one! You can note the change on our vendor list. And the coffee is rich and deep in flavor!

Bill Callahan~~~Cow-a-Hen Farm~~~will have freshly cut pork and freshly cured ham this week. Tarsa Family Farms has fresh garlic, black raspberry lemonade, meadow tea, and more. Quaff Meadows now has their lamb and also cut flowers, among their offerings.

Come celebrate summer with us~~~ see you tomorrow!

This week at market:
Stone Meadow Farm:
Artisan cheeses, grass-fed beef & veal, ring bologna, bratwurst, fresh chorizo
Cow-a-Hen Farm:  
Beef, Pork and Poultry: Freshly cut pork and freshly cured ham this week!
Beaver Run Farms
Sustainably raised pork and chicken, sausages, bacon, kielbasa
Tarsa Family Farm
Eggs, shell peas, beets, chard, parsley, and lots of of garlic, plants, squash and cucumbers, meadow tea and black raspberry lemonade
Quaff Meadows
Leaf lettuce, head lettuce, kale, sugar snap peas, hull peas, beets, turnips, zucchini, carrots, mint, red potatoes, honey, cut flowers. Lamb: chops, sausage, ground. 
Garden Secrets:  
All natural ketchups and barbecue sauces, mustards, sunflower pesto coming soon!
The Farm in Milton: 
Seasonal produce: including greens, summer squash, tomatoes
Wild for Salmon: First Friday of each month
Sustainably caught wild salmon from Alaska's Bristol Bay: portions, burgers, smoked salmon, dog treats, ravioli, and much more
O’Hara Orchards: 
Seasonal fruits
Broadway Acres Farm:
Tomatoes, onions, black raspberries, eggs 
Beiler's Bakery: 
Traditional Amish baked goods, including cookies, pies, breads
Luke Weaver Greenhouses:
Hothouse tomatoes, hothouse heirloom tomatoes, raspberries 
Gemelli Bakery:
Artisan breads, rustic baked goods
Buzzsaw Coffee:
Brewed coffees, coffee beans, granola

Like us on Facebook

* * * * *
Seasonal Recipe
Raspberry Whole Wheat Butter Cake
Adapted from Food and Wine; recipe by Zoe Nathan and Laurel Almerinda (April 2016)
Makes one 10-inch cake

This cake is from the pastry chefs at a restaurant called Huckleberry’s in Santa Monica, CA. If you can find some local fresh butter for this recipe, treat yourself; it also uses a tasty combination of almond flour, whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour and wheat germ. This would be delicious with black raspberries, too!

Ingredients:
2 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing 
1 1/4 cups almond flour
3/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup wheat germ
2 1/4 tsp. baking powder
2 cups plus 2 tbsp. sugar
2 1/4 tsp. kosher salt
2 tbsp. pure vanilla extract
7 large eggs
2 cups fresh raspberries, plus more for serving
Whipped cream, for serving

Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 10-inch round cake pan and line
the bottom with parchment paper. Butter the paper.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk all of the flours together with the wheat germ and
baking powder until well blended. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the
paddle (or hand mixer), combine the 2 sticks of butter with the 2 cups of sugar
and the salt, and beat at medium speed until pale yellow and fluffy, about 3
minutes. Beat in the vanilla, then beat in the eggs 1 at a time, scraping down the
side and the bottom of the bowl (the mixture will look broken). Add the dry
ingredients and beat at low speed just until incorporated and the batter is
smooth. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top. Arrange the
2 cups of raspberries in a single layer on top, then sprinkle with the remaining 2
tablespoons of sugar. Bake for about 50 minutes, until the cake is golden and a
cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer to a rack to cool for
15 minutes.

3. Run a thin, sharp knife around the edge of the cake. Invert the cake onto a
large plate; peel off the parchment paper. Turn the cake right side up on a
serving plate and let cool until warm, about 1 hour. Serve with whipped cream
and raspberries.

The cake can be stored at room temperature overnight.

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Questions or comments? Want to be more involved? Contact the SVGM at info@svgrowersmarket.com